Plants

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  • Abronia fragrans -  taller than Abronia elliptica and having night-blooming flowers
  • Abutilon -  herbs or shrubs or small trees: flowering maple; parlor maple; Indian mallow
  • Accolade -  a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction
  • Acer negundo -  common shade tree of eastern and central United States
  • Acer saccharinum -  a common North American maple tree; five-lobed leaves are light green above and silvery white beneath; source of hard close-grained but brittle light-brown wood
  • Acer saccharum -  maple of eastern and central North America having three-lobed to five-lobed leaves and hard close-grained wood much used for cabinet work especially the curly-grained form; sap is chief source of maple syrup and maple sugar; many subspecies
  • Achillea millefolium -  ubiquitous strong-scented mat-forming Eurasian herb of wasteland, hedgerow or pasture having narrow serrate leaves and small usually white florets; widely naturalized in North America
  • Acid rain -  rain containing acids that form in the atmosphere when industrial gas emissions (especially sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) combine with water
  • Acorus -  sweet flags; sometimes placed in subfamily Acoraceae
  • Acorus calamus -  perennial marsh plant having swordlike leaves and aromatic roots
  • Actinidia arguta -  climbing Asiatic vine having long finely serrate leaves and racemes of white flowers followed by greenish-yellow edible fruit
  • Actinidia chinensis -  climbing vine native to China; cultivated in New Zealand for its fuzzy edible fruit with green meat
  • Actinidia deliciosa -  climbing vine native to China; cultivated in New Zealand for its fuzzy edible fruit with green meat
  • Actinidia polygama -  ornamental vine of eastern Asia having yellow edible fruit and leaves with silver-white markings
  • Adansonia digitata -  African tree having an exceedingly thick trunk and fruit that resembles a gourd and has an edible pulp called monkey bread
  • Adansonia gregorii -  Australian tree having an agreeably acid fruit that resembles a gourd
  • Adzuki bean -  bushy annual widely grown in China and Japan for the flour made from its seeds
  • Aesculus -  deciduous trees or some shrubs of North America; southeastern Europe; eastern Asia
  • Agave -  tropical American plants with basal rosettes of fibrous sword-shaped leaves and flowers in tall spikes; some cultivated for ornament or for fiber
  • Agave americana -  widely cultivated American monocarpic plant with greenish-white flowers on a tall stalk; blooms only after ten to twenty years and then dies
  • Agave sisalana -  Mexican or West Indian plant with large fleshy leaves yielding a stiff fiber used in e.g. rope
  • agriculture -  the class of people engaged in growing food; the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock; a large-scale farming enterprise; the federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers (including research and soil conservation and efforts to stabilize the farming economy); created in 1862
  • Alabama -  the Muskhogean language of the Alabama; a state in the southeastern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War; a river in Alabama formed by the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near Montgomery; flows southwestward to become a tributary of the Mobile River; a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in Alabama; a member of the Creek Confederacy
  • Albizia -  any of numerous trees of the genus Albizia
  • Albizia julibrissin -  attractive domed or flat-topped Asiatic tree having bipinnate leaves and flowers with long silky stamens
  • Albizia lebbeck -  large spreading Old World tree having large leaves and globose clusters of greenish-yellow flowers and long seed pods that clatter in the wind
  • Alexander -  king of Macedon; conqueror of Greece and Egypt and Persia; founder of Alexandria (356-323 BC); European herb somewhat resembling celery widely naturalized in Britain coastal regions and often cultivated as a potherb
  • Alfalfa -  leguminous plant grown for hay or forage; important European leguminous forage plant with trifoliate leaves and blue-violet flowers grown widely as a pasture and hay crop
  • Allium -  large genus of perennial and biennial pungent bulbous plants: garlic; leek; onion; chive; sometimes placed in family Alliaceae as the type genus
  • Allium ampeloprasum -  coarse Old World perennial having a large bulb and tall stalk of greenish purple-tinged flowers; widely naturalized
  • Allium tricoccum -  North American perennial having a slender bulb and whitish flowers
  • Allspice -  ground dried berrylike fruit of a West Indian allspice tree; suggesting combined flavors of cinnamon and nutmeg and cloves; deciduous shrubs having aromatic bark; eastern China; southwestern and eastern United States; aromatic West Indian tree that produces allspice berries
  • Almond -  oval-shaped edible seed of the almond tree; small bushy deciduous tree native to Asia and North Africa having pretty pink blossoms and highly prized edible nuts enclosed in a hard green hull; cultivated in southern Australia and California
  • Almond oil -  pale yellow fatty oil expressed from sweet or bitter almonds
  • Alpinia officinarum -  Chinese perennial with pyramidal racemes of white flowers and pungent aromatic roots used medicinally and as flavoring
  • Amaranth -  any of various plants of the genus Amaranthus having dense plumes of green or red flowers; often cultivated for food; seed of amaranth plants used as a native cereal in Central and South America
  • Amaranthus cruentus -  tall showy tropical American annual having hairy stems and long spikes of usually red flowers above leaves deeply flushed with purple; seeds often used as cereal
  • Amaranthus hypochondriacus -  leaves sometimes used as potherbs; seeds used as cereal; southern United States to Central America; India and China
  • Ambrosia -  (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal; fruit dessert made of oranges and bananas with shredded coconut; any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma; a mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvae
  • Amelanchier -  North American deciduous trees or shrubs
  • Amelanchier -  North American deciduous trees or shrubs
  • Amelanchier alnifolia -  shrub or small tree of northwestern North America having fragrant creamy white flowers and small waxy purple-red fruits
  • American ginseng -  North American woodland herb similar to and used as substitute for the Chinese ginseng
  • Amino -  pertaining to or containing any of a group of organic compounds of nitrogen derived from ammonia;  the radical -NH2
  • Amphicarpaea bracteata -  vine widely distributed in eastern North America producing racemes of purple to maroon flowers and abundant (usually subterranean) edible one-seeded pods resembling peanuts
  • Anderson -  United States physicist who discovered antimatter in the form of an antielectron that is called the positron (1905-1991); United States contralto noted for her performance of spirituals (1902-1993); United States dramatist (1888-1959); United States physicist who studied the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems (1923-); United States author whose works were frequently autobiographical (1876-1941)
  • Angelica archangelica -  a biennial cultivated herb; its stems are candied and eaten and its roots are used medicinally
  • Annona -  type genus of the Annonaceae; tropical American trees or shrubs
  • Annona -  type genus of the Annonaceae; tropical American trees or shrubs
  • Annona glabra -  small evergreen tree of tropical America with edible fruit; used chiefly as grafting stock
  • Annona reticulata -  small tropical American tree bearing a bristly heart-shaped acid tropical fruit
  • Antagonism -  (biochemistry) interference in or inhibition of the physiological action of a chemical substance by another having a similar structure; an actively expressed feeling of dislike and hostility; the relation between opposing principles or forces or factors; a state of deep-seated ill-will
  • Anthriscus sylvestris -  coarse erect biennial Old World herb introduced as a weed in eastern North America
  • Apios americana -  a North American vine with fragrant blossoms and edible tubers; important food crop of Native Americans
  • Apocynum -  perennial herbs with small pink or white flowers
  • Apocynum cannabinum -  Canadian dogbane yielding a tough fiber used as cordage by native Americans; used in folk medicine for pain or inflammation in joints
  • appetizer -  food or drink to stimulate the appetite (usually served before a meal or as the first course)
  • Apple -  fruit with red or yellow or green skin and sweet to tart crisp whitish flesh; native Eurasian tree widely cultivated in many varieties for its firm rounded edible fruits
  • Apricot -  downy yellow to rosy-colored fruit resembling a small peach; Asian tree having clusters of usually white blossoms and edible fruit resembling the peach; a shade of pink tinged with yellow
  • Arabidopsis thaliana -  a small invasive self-pollinating weed with small white flowers; much studied by plant geneticists; the first higher plant whose complete genome sequence was described
  • Arachis -  a genus of plants with pods that ripen underground (see peanut)
  • Arachis hypogaea -  widely cultivated American plant cultivated in tropical and warm regions; showy yellow flowers on stalks that bend over to the soil so that seed pods ripen underground
  • Aralia elata -  deciduous clump-forming Asian shrub or small tree; adventive in the eastern United States
  • Aralia spinosa -  small deciduous clump-forming tree or shrub of eastern United States
  • Araucaria araucana -  large Chilean evergreen conifer having intertwined branches and bearing edible nuts
  • Araucaria bidwillii -  Australian conifer bearing two-inch seeds tasting like roasted chestnuts; among the aborigines the tree is hereditary property protected by law
  • Arbutus -  any of several evergreen shrubs of the genus Arbutus of temperate Europe and America
  • Arbutus unedo -  small evergreen European shrubby tree bearing many-seeded scarlet berries that are edible but bland; of Ireland, southern Europe, Asia Minor
  • Arctium lappa -  burdock having heart-shaped leaves found in open woodland, hedgerows and rough grassland of Europe (except extreme N) and Asia Minor; sometimes cultivated for medicinal and culinary use
  • Areca catechu -  southeastern Asian palm bearing betel nuts (scarlet or orange single-seeded fruit with a fibrous husk)
  • Arenga pinnata -  Malaysian feather palm with base densely clothed with fibers; yields a sweet sap used in wine and trunk pith yields sago
  • Aristotelia serrata -  graceful deciduous shrub or small tree having attractive foliage and small red berries that turn black at maturity and are used for making wine
  • Arrowroot -  white-flowered West Indian plant whose root yields arrowroot starch; a nutritive starch obtained from the root of the arrowroot plant; canna grown especially for its edible rootstock from which arrowroot starch is obtained
  • Artemisia absinthium -  aromatic herb of temperate Eurasia and North Africa having a bitter taste used in making the liqueur absinthe
  • Artemisia tridentata -  aromatic shrub of arid regions of western North America having hoary leaves
  • Artemisia vulgaris -  European tufted aromatic perennial herb having hairy red or purple stems and dark green leaves downy white below and red-brown florets
  • Artichoke -  a thistlelike flower head with edible fleshy leaves and heart; Mediterranean thistlelike plant widely cultivated for its large edible flower head
  • Artocarpus altilis -  native to Pacific islands and having edible fruit with a texture like bread
  • artwork -  photographs or other visual representations in a printed publication
  • Arundo -  any of several coarse tall perennial grasses of most warm areas: reeds
  • Arundo donax -  large rhizomatous perennial grasses found by riversides and in ditches having jointed stems and large grey-white feathery panicles
  • Asafoetida -  the brownish gum resin of various plants; has strong taste and odor; formerly used as an antispasmodic
  • Asarum canadense -  deciduous low-growing perennial of Canada and eastern and central United States
  • Ascophyllum -  brown algae distinguished by compressed or inflated branchlets along the axis
  • Asimina triloba -  small tree native to the eastern United States having oblong leaves and fleshy fruit
  • Asparagus -  edible young shoots of the asparagus plant; plant whose succulent young shoots are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
  • Asparagus bean -  South American bean having very long succulent pods
  • Asplenium -  in some classification systems placed in family Polypodiaceae
  • Aster -  star-shaped structure formed in the cytoplasm of a cell having fibers like rays that surround the centrosome during mitosis; any of various chiefly fall-blooming herbs of the genus Aster with showy daisylike flowers
  • Astragalus -  large genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of north temperate regions; largest genus in the family Leguminosae; the bone in the ankle that articulates with the leg bones to form the ankle joint
  • Atriplex hortensis -  Asiatic plant resembling spinach often used as a potherb; naturalized in Europe and North America
  • Attalea -  unarmed feather palms of central and northern South America
  • Avocado -  of the dull yellowish green of the meat of an avocado;  a pear-shaped tropical fruit with green or blackish skin and rich yellowish pulp enclosing a single large seed; tropical American tree bearing large pulpy green fruits
  • Azolla -  a genus of fern sometimes placed in its own family Azollaceae
  • Babassu oil -  fatty oil from kernels of babassu nuts similar to coconut oil
  • Baklava -  rich Middle Eastern cake made of thin layers of flaky pastry filled with nuts and honey
  • Baldwin -  an American eating apple with red or yellow and red skin; English statesman; member of the Conservative Party (1867-1947); United States author who was an outspoken critic of racism (1924-1987)
  • Balsam of Peru -  dark brown syrupy balsam from the Peruvian balsam tree used especially in dressing wounds and treating certain skin diseases
  • Bamboo -  woody tropical grass having hollow woody stems; mature canes used for construction and furniture; the hard woody stems of bamboo plants; used in construction and crafts and fishing poles
  • Banana -  elongated crescent-shaped yellow fruit with soft sweet flesh; any of several tropical and subtropical treelike herbs of the genus Musa having a terminal crown of large entire leaves and usually bearing hanging clusters of elongated fruits
  • Banner -  unusually good; outstanding;  long strip of cloth or paper used for decoration or advertising; a newspaper headline that runs across the full page
  • Barbarea -  biennial or perennial herbs of north temperate regions: winter cress
  • Barbarea vulgaris -  noxious cress with yellow flowers; sometimes placed in genus Sisymbrium
  • Barbarossa -  Barbary pirate (died in 1546); Holy Roman Emperor from 1152 to 1190; conceded supremacy to the pope; drowned leading the Third Crusade (1123-1190)
  • Barley -  a grain of barley; cultivated since prehistoric times; grown for forage and grain
  • Bauhinia -  mountain ebony, orchid tree
  • Bay leaf -  dried leaf of the bay laurel
  • Bdellium -  aromatic gum resin; similar to myrrh
  • Beacon -  a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships; a fire (usually on a hill or tower) that can be seen from a distance; a radio station that broadcasts a directional signal for navigational purposes;  guide with a beacon; shine like a beacon
  • Bed sheet -  bed linen consisting of a large rectangular piece of cotton or linen cloth; used in pairs
  • Beetroot -  beet having a massively swollen red root; widely grown for human consumption; round red root vegetable
  • Begonia -  any of numerous plants of the genus Begonia grown for their attractive glossy asymmetrical leaves and colorful flowers in usually terminal cymes or racemes
  • Bell-bottoms -  trousers with legs that flare; worn by sailors; absurdly wide hems were fashionable in the 1960s
  • Bell pepper -  large bell-shaped sweet pepper in green or red or yellow or orange or black varieties; plant bearing large mild thick-walled usually bell-shaped fruits; the principal salad peppers
  • Benzoin -  used in some classifications for the American spicebush and certain other plants often included in the genus Lindera; gum resin used especially in treating skin irritation
  • Berberis canadensis -  deciduous shrub of eastern North America whose leaves turn scarlet in autumn and having racemes of yellow flowers followed by ellipsoid glossy red berries
  • Berberis vulgaris -  upright deciduous European shrub widely naturalized in United States having clusters of juicy berries
  • Bergamot orange -  small tree with pear-shaped fruit whose oil is used in perfumery; Italy
  • Beta vulgaris -  biennial Eurasian plant usually having a swollen edible root; widely cultivated as a food crop
  • Betula nigra -  birch of swamps and river bottoms throughout the eastern United States having reddish-brown bark
  • beverage -  any liquid suitable for drinking
  • Bialy -  flat crusty-bottomed onion roll
  • biologist -  (biology) a scientist who studies living organisms
  • Bird-scarer -  an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seeds
  • Bismarck -  capital of the state of North Dakota; located in south central North Dakota overlooking the Missouri river; German statesman under whose leadership Germany was united (1815-1898)
  • Bitter almond -  almond trees having white blossoms and poisonous nuts yielding an oil used for flavoring and for medicinal purposes
  • Bitter orange -  highly acidic orange used especially in marmalade; any of various common orange trees yielding sour or bitter fruit; used as grafting stock
  • Bitterroot -  showy succulent ground-hugging plant of Rocky Mountains regions having deep to pale pink flowers and fleshy farinaceous roots; the Montana state flower
  • Bitters -  alcoholic liquor flavored with bitter herbs and roots
  • Black pepper -  pepper that is ground from whole peppercorns with husks on; climber having dark red berries (peppercorns) when fully ripe; southern India and Sri Lanka; naturalized in northern Burma and Assam
  • Black rot -  a fungous disease causing darkening and decay of the leaves of fruits and vegetables
  • Blackheart -  heart cherry with dark flesh and skin cherry; any of various diseases in which the central tissues blacken
  • Blighia sapida -  widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions for its fragrant flowers and colorful fruits; introduced in Jamaica by William Bligh
  • Blight -  any plant disease resulting in withering without rotting; a state or condition being blighted;  cause to suffer a blight
  • Blueberry -  sweet edible dark-blue berries of either low-growing or high-growing blueberry plants; any of numerous shrubs of the genus Vaccinium bearing blueberries
  • Boehmeria nivea -  tall perennial herb of tropical Asia with dark green leaves; cultivated for the fiber from its woody stems that resembles flax
  • Bok choy -  elongated head of dark green leaves on thick white stalks; Asiatic plant grown for its cluster of edible white stalks with dark green leaves
  • Boll weevil -  greyish weevil that lays its eggs in cotton bolls destroying the cotton
  • Bombay -  a city in western India just off the coast of the Arabian Sea; India's 2nd largest city (after Calcutta); has the only natural deep-water harbor in western India
  • Borage -  leaves flavor sauces and punches; young leaves eaten in salads or cooked; hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
  • Borassus flabellifer -  tall fan palm of Africa and India and Malaysia yielding a hard wood and sweet sap that is a source of palm wine and sugar; leaves used for thatching and weaving
  • Borscht -  a Russian soup usually containing beet juice as a foundation
  • Boswellia serrata -  East Indian tree yielding a resin used medicinally and burned as incense
  • botanist -  a biologist specializing in the study of plants
  • botany -  the branch of biology that studies plants; all the plant life in a particular region or period
  • Bougainvillea -  any of several South American ornamental woody vines of the genus Bougainvillea having brilliant red or purple flower bracts; widely grown in warm regions
  • Boysenberry -  large raspberry-flavored fruit; cross between blackberries and raspberries; cultivated hybrid bramble of California having large dark wine-red fruit with a flavor resembling raspberries
  • Brachychiton populneus -  widely distributed tree of eastern Australia yielding a tough durable fiber and soft light attractively grained wood; foliage is an important emergency food for cattle
  • brandy -  distilled from wine or fermented fruit juice
  • Brassica nigra -  widespread Eurasian annual plant cultivated for its pungent seeds; a principal source of table mustard
  • Brassica rapa -  widely cultivated plant having a large fleshy edible white or yellow root
  • Brazil nut -  three-sided tropical American nut with white oily meat and hard brown shell; tall South American tree bearing brazil nuts
  • Breadfruit -  a large round seedless or seeded fruit with a texture like bread; eaten boiled or baked or roasted or ground into flour; the roasted seeds resemble chestnuts; native to Pacific islands and having edible fruit with a texture like bread
  • Broad-bean -  Old World upright plant grown especially for its large flat edible seeds but also as fodder
  • Broccoli -  branched green undeveloped flower heads; plant with dense clusters of tight green flower buds
  • Brooks -  United States literary critic and historian (1886-1963)
  • Broussonetia papyrifera -  shrubby Asiatic tree having bark (tapa) that resembles cloth; grown as a shade tree in Europe and America; male flowers are pendulous catkins and female are urn-shaped followed by small orange-red aggregate berries
  • Brown rice -  unpolished rice retaining the yellowish-brown outer layer
  • Browsing -  the act of feeding by continual nibbling; reading superficially or at random
  • Brussels sprout -  plant grown for its stout stalks of edible small green heads resembling diminutive cabbages
  • Bryanthus -  procumbent Old World mat-forming evergreen shrub with racemes of pinkish-white flowers
  • Bryonia dioica -  bryony having fleshy roots pale green flowers and very small red berries; Europe; North Africa; western Asia
  • Buckwheat -  grain ground into flour; a member of the genus Fagopyrum; annual Asian plant with clusters of small pinkish white flowers and small edible triangular seeds which are used whole or ground into flour
  • Bullace -  small wild or half-domesticated Eurasian plum bearing small ovoid fruit in clusters
  • Burton -  a strong dark English ale; Welsh film actor who often co-starred with Elizabeth Taylor (1925-1984); English explorer who with John Speke was the first European to explore Lake Tanganyika (1821-1890)
  • Butler -  a manservant (usually the head servant of a household) who has charge of wines and the table; English poet (1612-1680); English novelist who described a fictitious land he called Erewhon (1835-1902)
  • Cabbage -  any of various types of cabbage; any of various cultivars of the genus Brassica oleracea grown for their edible leaves or flowers; informal terms for money;  make off with belongings of others
  • Caesar salad -  typically having fried croutons and dressing made with a raw egg
  • Cajanus cajan -  tropical woody herb with showy yellow flowers and flat pods; much cultivated in the tropics
  • Cakile maritima -  salt-tolerant seashore annual grown for its fragrant rose or violet flowers and fleshy grey-green foliage
  • Calabash -  a pipe for smoking; has a curved stem and a large bowl made from a calabash gourd; tropical American evergreen that produces large round gourds; round gourd of the calabash tree; bottle made from the dried shell of a bottle gourd; Old World climbing plant with hard-shelled bottle-shaped gourds as fruits
  • Caladenia -  any of various orchids of the genus Caladenia
  • Calamus rotang -  climbing palm of Sri Lanka and southern India remarkable for the great length of the stems which are used for malacca canes
  • Calico -  made of calico or resembling calico in being patterned; having sections or patches colored differently and usually brightly;  coarse cloth with a bright print
  • Calochortus amabilis -  globe lily having open branched clusters of clear yellow egg-shaped flowers; northern California
  • Calochortus elegans -  small plant with slender bent stems bearing branched clusters of a few white star-shaped flowers with petals shaped like cat's ears; southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon to Montana
  • Calochortus nuttallii -  perennial plant having clusters of one to four showy white bell-shaped flowers atop erect unbranched stems; edible bulbs useful in times of scarcity; eastern Montana and western North Dakota south to northern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico
  • Calvin Klein -  United States fashion designer noted for understated fashions (born in 1942)
  • Calypso bulbosa -  rare north temperate bog orchid bearing a solitary white to pink flower marked with purple at the tip of an erect reddish stalk above 1 basal leaf
  • Calystegia -  climbing or scrambling herbs: bindweed
  • Camassia -  genus of scapose herbs of North and South America having large edible bulbs
  • Camassia quamash -  plant having a large edible bulb and linear basal leaves and racemes of light to deep violet-blue star-shaped flowers on tall green scapes; western North America
  • Camberwell Beauty -  of temperate regions; having dark purple wings with yellow borders
  • Cambria -  one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; during Roman times the region was known as Cambria
  • Camelina -  annual and biennial herbs of Mediterranean to central Asia
  • Camelina sativa -  annual European false flax having small white flowers; cultivated since Neolithic times as a source of fiber and for its oil-rich seeds; widely naturalized in North America
  • Camellia -  any of several shrubs or small evergreen trees having solitary white or pink or reddish flowers
  • Camellia sinensis -  a tropical evergreen shrub or small tree extensively cultivated in e.g. China and Japan and India; source of tea leaves
  • Cameo -  engraving or carving in low relief on a stone (as in a brooch or ring)
  • Campanula rapunculus -  bellflower of Europe and Asia and North Africa having bluish flowers and an edible tuberous root used with the leaves in salad
  • Camphor -  a resin obtained from the camphor tree; used in making celluloid and liniment
  • Canada -  a nation in northern North America; the French were the first Europeans to settle in mainland Canada
  • Canavalia ensiformis -  annual semi-erect bushy plant of tropical South America bearing long pods with white seeds grown especially for forage
  • Canavalia gladiata -  twining tropical Old World plant bearing long pods usually with red or brown beans; long cultivated in Orient for food
  • Canella -  highly aromatic inner bark of the Canella winterana used as a condiment and a tonic
  • Canker -  an ulceration (especially of the lips or lining of the mouth); a fungal disease of woody plants that causes localized damage to the bark; a pernicious and malign influence that is hard to get rid of;  infect with a canker; become infected with a canker
  • Canna indica -  canna grown especially for its edible rootstock from which arrowroot starch is obtained
  • Cannabis -  the most commonly used illicit drug; considered a soft drug, it consists of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect; any plant of the genus Cannabis; a coarse bushy annual with palmate leaves and clusters of small green flowers; yields tough fibers and narcotic drugs
  • Cannabis sativa -  a strong-smelling plant from whose dried leaves a number of euphoriant and hallucinogenic drugs are prepared
  • Cantaloupe -  a variety of muskmelon vine having fruit with a tan rind and orange flesh; the fruit of a cantaloup vine; small to medium-sized melon with yellowish flesh
  • Cantharellus cibarius -  widely distributed edible mushroom rich yellow in color with a smooth cap and a pleasant apricot aroma
  • Capsicum -  any of various tropical plants of the genus Capsicum bearing peppers; chiefly tropical perennial shrubby plants having many-seeded fruits: sweet and hot peppers
  • Capsicum baccatum -  plant bearing very small and very hot oblong red fruits; includes wild forms native to tropical America; thought to be ancestral to the sweet pepper and many hot peppers
  • Capsicum frutescens -  plant bearing very hot medium-sized oblong red peppers; grown principally in the Gulf Coast states for production of hot sauce
  • Carabao -  water buffalo of the Philippines
  • Caragana arborescens -  large spiny shrub of eastern Asia having clusters of yellow flowers; often cultivated in shelterbelts and hedges
  • Carambola -  deeply ridged yellow-brown tropical fruit; used raw as a vegetable or in salad or when fully ripe as a dessert; East Indian tree bearing deeply ridged yellow-brown fruit
  • Caraway -  leaves used sparingly in soups and stews; a Eurasian plant with small white flowers yielding caraway seed
  • Cardamom -  aromatic seeds used as seasoning like cinnamon and cloves especially in pickles and barbecue sauces; rhizomatous herb of India having aromatic seeds used as seasoning
  • Cardinal -  serving as an essential component; being or denoting a numerical quantity but not order;  crested thick-billed North American finch having bright red plumage in the male; a variable color averaging a vivid red; (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popes; the number of elements in a mathematical set; denotes a quantity but not the order
  • Cardoon -  only parts eaten are roots and especially stalks (blanched and used as celery); related to artichokes; southern European plant having spiny leaves and purple flowers cultivated for its edible leafstalks and roots
  • Carex -  large genus of plants found in damp woodlands and bogs and ditches or at water margins: sedges
  • Carissa -  a shrub of the genus Carissa having fragrant white flowers and plumlike red to purple-black fruits
  • Carissa macrocarpa -  very large closely branched South African shrub having forked bright green spines and shiny leaves
  • Carpobrotus edulis -  low-growing South African succulent plant having a capsular fruit containing edible pulp
  • Carrot -  promise of reward as in "carrot and stick"; orange root; important source of carotene; perennial plant widely cultivated as an annual in many varieties for its long conical orange edible roots; temperate and tropical regions; deep orange edible root of the cultivated carrot plant
  • Carya glabra -  an American hickory tree having bitter nuts
  • Carya laciniosa -  hickory of the eastern United States resembling the shagbark but having a much larger nut
  • Carya ovata -  North American hickory having loose grey shaggy bark and edible nuts
  • Carya tomentosa -  smooth-barked North American hickory with 7 to 9 leaflets bearing a hard-shelled edible nut
  • Caryota urens -  fishtail palm of India to Malay Peninsula; sap yields a brown sugar (jaggery) and trunk pith yields sago
  • Cash crop -  a readily salable crop that is grown and gathered for the market (as vegetables or cotton or tobacco)
  • Cashew -  kidney-shaped nut edible only when roasted; tropical American evergreen tree bearing kidney-shaped nuts that are edible only when roasted
  • Cassava -  any of several plants of the genus Manihot having fleshy roots yielding a nutritious starch; cassava root eaten as a staple food after drying and leaching; source of tapioca; a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plant; the source of tapioca; a staple food in the tropics
  • Castanea mollissima -  a small tree with small sweet nuts; wild or naturalized in Korea and China
  • Castanea ozarkensis -  shrubby tree closely related to the Allegheny chinkapin but with larger leaves; southern midwestern United States
  • Castanea pumila -  shrubby chestnut tree of southeastern United States having small edible nuts
  • Castanea sativa -  wild or cultivated throughout southern Europe, northwestern Africa and southwestern Asia
  • Castile soap -  a good hard soap made from olive oil and sodium hydroxide
  • Catalpa -  tree of the genus Catalpa with large leaves and white flowers followed by long slender pods
  • Catawba -  the Siouan language spoken by the Catawba; slipskin grape; a reddish American table grape; a member of the Siouan people formerly living in the Carolinas
  • Catch crop -  a crop that grows quickly (e.g. lettuce) and can be planted between two regular crops grown in successive seasons or between two rows of crops in the same season
  • Catechu -  East Indian spiny tree having twice-pinnate leaves and yellow flowers followed by flat pods; source of black catechu; extract of the heartwood of Acacia catechu used for dying and tanning and preserving fishnets and sails; formerly used medicinally
  • Cattleya -  any orchid of the genus Cattleya characterized by a three-lobed lip enclosing the column; among the most popular and most extravagantly beautiful orchids known
  • Cauliflower -  compact head of white undeveloped flowers; a plant having a large edible head of crowded white flower buds
  • Cayenne pepper -  a long and often twisted hot red pepper; ground pods and seeds of pungent red peppers of the genus Capsicum; plant bearing very hot and finely tapering long peppers; usually red
  • Ceiba pentandra -  massive tropical tree with deep ridges on its massive trunk and bearing large pods of seeds covered with silky floss; source of the silky kapok fiber
  • Celeriac -  thickened edible aromatic root of a variety of celery plant; grown for its thickened edible aromatic root
  • Celery -  stalks eaten raw or cooked or used as seasoning; widely cultivated herb with aromatic leaf stalks that are eaten raw or cooked
  • Celosia -  annual or perennial herbs or vines of tropical and subtropical America and Asia and Africa
  • Celtuce -  leaves having celery-like stems eaten raw or cooked; lettuce valued especially for its edible stems
  • Cenchrus ciliaris -  erect tussock-forming perennial bur grass used particularly in South Africa and Australia for pasture and forage
  • Censer -  a container for burning incense (especially one that is swung on a chain in a religious ritual)
  • Centranthus ruber -  European herb with small fragrant crimson or white spurred flowers
  • Cereal -  made of grain or relating to grain or the plants that produce it;  a breakfast food prepared from grain; grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet; foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses
  • Champion -  holding first place in a contest;  someone who fights for a cause; someone who has won first place in a competition; someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field; a person who backs a politician or a team etc.;  protect or fight for as a champion
  • Chanterelle -  widely distributed edible mushroom rich yellow in color with a smooth cap and a pleasant apricot aroma
  • Chardonnay -  dry white table wine resembling Chablis but made from Chardonnay grapes; white wine grape
  • Charlotte -  a mold lined with cake or crumbs and filled with fruit or whipped cream or custard; the largest city in North Carolina; located in south central North Carolina
  • cheese -  a solid food prepared from the pressed curd of milk; erect or decumbent Old World perennial with axillary clusters of rosy-purple flowers; introduced in United States;  wind onto a cheese; used in the imperative (get away, or stop it)
  • Chenopodium album -  common weedy European plant introduced into North America; often used as a potherb
  • Cherimoya -  large tropical fruit with leathery skin and soft pulp; related to custard apples; small tropical American tree bearing round or oblong fruit
  • Cherry -  of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies;  a red fruit with a single hard stone; any of numerous trees and shrubs producing a small fleshy round fruit with a single hard stone; many also produce a valuable hardwood; wood of any of various cherry trees especially the black cherry; a red the color of ripe cherries
  • Cherry plum -  small Asiatic tree bearing edible red or yellow fruit; used in Europe as budding stock
  • Cherry tomato -  small red to yellow tomatoes; plant bearing small red to yellow fruit
  • Chervil -  fresh ferny parsley-like leaves used as a garnish with chicken and veal and omelets and green salads and spinach; aromatic annual Old World herb cultivated for its finely divided and often curly leaves for use especially in soups and salads
  • Chestnut -  (of hair) of a golden brown to reddish brown color;  a dark golden-brown or reddish-brown horse; a small horny callus on the inner surface of a horse's leg; edible nut of any of various chestnut trees of the genus Castanea; any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur; wood of any of various chestnut trees of the genus Castanea
  • Chickpea -  large white roundish Asiatic legume; usually dried; Asiatic herb cultivated for its short pods with one or two edible seeds; the seed of the chickpea plant
  • Chicle -  gum-like substance from the sapodilla
  • Chicory -  crisp spiky leaves with somewhat bitter taste; root of the chicory plant roasted and ground to substitute for or adulterate coffee; perennial Old World herb having rayed flower heads with blue florets cultivated for its root and its heads of crisp edible leaves used in salads; the dried root of the chicory plant: used as a coffee substitute
  • Chili pepper -  very hot and finely tapering pepper of special pungency; plant bearing very hot and finely tapering long peppers; usually red
  • Chili powder -  powder made of ground chili peppers mixed with e.g. cumin and garlic and oregano
  • China -  high quality porcelain originally made only in China; a communist nation that covers a vast territory in eastern Asia; the most populous country in the world; dishware made of high quality porcelain; a government on the island of Taiwan established in 1949 by Chiang Kai-shek after the conquest of mainland China by the communists led by Mao Zedong
  • Chinese cabbage -  elongated head of crisp celery-like stalks and light green leaves; plant with an elongated head of broad stalked leaves resembling celery; used as a vegetable in east Asia
  • Chinese yam -  hardy Chinese vine naturalized in United States and cultivated as an ornamental climber for its glossy heart-shaped cinnamon-scented leaves and in the tropics for its edible tubers
  • Chipotle -  a ripe jalapeno that has been dried for use in cooking
  • Chipper -  having a cheerful, lively, and self-confident air
  • Chives -  cylindrical leaves used fresh as a mild onion-flavored seasoning; perennial having hollow cylindrical leaves used for seasoning
  • Chloris gayana -  perennial grass of South Africa introduced into United States; cultivated as forage grass in dry regions
  • Chlorosis -  iron deficiency anemia in young women; characterized by weakness and menstrual disturbances and a green color to the skin
  • Chrism -  a consecrated ointment consisting of a mixture of oil and balsam
  • Chrysanthemum -  any of numerous perennial Old World herbs having showy brightly colored flower heads of the genera Chrysanthemum, Argyranthemum, Dendranthema, Tanacetum; widely cultivated; the flower of a chrysanthemum plant
  • Chrysophyllum cainito -  evergreen tree of West Indies and Central America having edible purple fruit star-shaped in cross section and dark green leaves with golden silky undersides
  • Cicer arietinum -  Asiatic herb cultivated for its short pods with one or two edible seeds
  • Cichorium endivia -  widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched
  • cigarette -  finely ground tobacco wrapped in paper; for smoking
  • Cinnamomum camphora -  large evergreen tree of warm regions whose aromatic wood yields camphor
  • Cinnamomum cassia -  Chinese tree with aromatic bark; yields a less desirable cinnamon than Ceylon cinnamon
  • Cinnamon -  spice from the dried aromatic bark of the Ceylon cinnamon tree; used as rolled strips or ground; tropical Asian tree with aromatic yellowish-brown bark; source of the spice cinnamon; aromatic bark used as a spice
  • Cirsium arvense -  European thistle naturalized in United States and Canada where it is a pernicious weed
  • Cirsium vulgare -  European thistle with rather large heads and prickly leaves; extensively naturalized as a weed in the United States
  • Cistus -  small to medium-sized evergreen shrubs of southern Europe and North Africa
  • Citrange -  more aromatic and acid tasting than oranges; used in beverages and marmalade; more aromatic and acidic than oranges
  • Citron -  large lemonlike fruit with thick aromatic rind; usually preserved; thorny evergreen small tree or shrub of India widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have thick warty rind
  • citrus -  any of numerous fruits of the genus Citrus having thick rind and juicy pulp; grown in warm regions; any of numerous tropical usually thorny evergreen trees of the genus Citrus having leathery evergreen leaves and widely cultivated for their juicy edible fruits having leathery aromatic rinds
  • Citrus -  any of numerous fruits of the genus Citrus having thick rind and juicy pulp; grown in warm regions; any of numerous tropical usually thorny evergreen trees of the genus Citrus having leathery evergreen leaves and widely cultivated for their juicy edible fruits having leathery aromatic rinds
  • Citrus limetta -  lemon tree having fruit with a somewhat insipid sweetish pulp
  • Clark -  Canadian politician who served as prime minister (1939-); United States psychologist (born in Panama) whose research persuaded the Supreme Court that segregated schools were discriminatory (1914-); United States general who was Allied commander in Africa and Italy in World War II and was commander of the United Nations forces in Korea (1896-1984); United States explorer who (with Meriwether Lewis) led an expedition from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River; Clark was responsible for making maps of the area (1770-1838)
  • Claviceps purpurea -  a fungus that infects various cereal plants forming compact black masses of branching filaments that replace many grains of the plant; source of medicinally important alkaloids and of lysergic acid
  • Claytonia virginica -  small cormous perennial grown for its low rosette of succulent foliage and racemes of pink-tinged white flowers; eastern North America
  • Clementine -  a mandarin orange of a deep reddish orange color and few seeds; a variety of mandarin orange that is grown around the Mediterranean and in South Africa
  • Cleome serrulata -  plant of western North America having trifoliate leaves and white or pink spider-shaped flowers; sometimes used as an ornamental
  • Clinton -  a town in east central Iowa; United States politician who as governor of New York supported the project to build the Erie Canal (1769-1828); 42nd President of the United States (1946-); wife of President Clinton and later a woman member of the United States Senate (1947-)
  • Clitocybe nuda -  edible agaric that is pale lilac when young; has a smooth moist cap
  • clothing -  a covering designed to be worn on a person's body
  • Clover -  a plant of the genus Trifolium
  • Cobbler -  tall sweetened iced drink of wine or liquor with fruit; a person who makes or repairs shoes; made of fruit with rich biscuit dough usually only on top of the fruit
  • cocktail -  an appetizer served as a first course at a meal; a short mixed drink
  • Cocoa bean -  seed of the cacao tree; ground roasted beans are source of chocolate
  • Cocoa butter -  the vegetable fat from the cacao that is extracted from chocolate liquor; the basis for white chocolate; a yellow-white fat from cocoa beans
  • Coconut -  large hard-shelled oval nut with a fibrous husk containing thick white meat surrounding a central cavity filled (when fresh) with fluid or milk; the edible white meat a coconut; often shredded for use in e.g. cakes and curries; tall palm tree bearing coconuts as fruits; widely planted throughout the tropics
  • Coconut -  large hard-shelled oval nut with a fibrous husk containing thick white meat surrounding a central cavity filled (when fresh) with fluid or milk; the edible white meat a coconut; often shredded for use in e.g. cakes and curries; tall palm tree bearing coconuts as fruits; widely planted throughout the tropics
  • Coconut Cream -  white liquid obtained from compressing fresh coconut meat
  • Cocos nucifera -  tall palm tree bearing coconuts as fruits; widely planted throughout the tropics
  • Coffea arabica -  shrubby tree of northeastern tropical Africa widely cultivated in tropical or near tropical regions for its seed which form most of the commercial coffee
  • Coffea canephora -  native to West Africa but grown in Java and elsewhere; resistant to coffee rust
  • Coffee -  a beverage consisting of an infusion of ground coffee beans; any of several small trees and shrubs native to the tropical Old World yielding coffee beans; a medium brown to dark-brown color; a seed of the coffee tree; ground to make coffee
  • Coffee bean -  a seed of the coffee tree; ground to make coffee
  • Cohune oil -  semisolid fat from nuts of the cohune palm; used in cooking and soap making
  • Colchicum -  chiefly fall-blooming perennial cormous herbs; sometimes placed in family Colchicaceae
  • Coleus amboinicus -  an aromatic fleshy herb of India and Ceylon to South Africa; sometimes placed in genus Plectranthus
  • Collard -  variety of kale having smooth leaves
  • Colocasia esculenta -  herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
  • Colorado potato beetle -  black-and-yellow beetle that feeds in adult and larval stages on potato leaves; originally of eastern Rocky Mountains; now worldwide
  • Colossal -  so great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe
  • Colza oil -  edible light yellow to brown oil from rapeseed used also as a lubricant or illuminant
  • Commendation -  a message expressing a favorable opinion; an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement
  • Common fig -  Mediterranean tree widely cultivated for its edible fruit
  • Common wheat -  widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important grain
  • company -  an institution created to conduct business; a unit of firefighters including their equipment; a social gathering of guests or companions; organization of performers and associated personnel (especially theatrical); small military unit; usually two or three platoons; the state of being with someone; crew of a ship including the officers; the whole force or personnel of a ship; a band of people associated temporarily in some activity; a social or business visitor;  be a companion to somebody
  • Compote -  dessert of stewed or baked fruit
  • Concord grape -  slipskin grape; a purple table grape of the northeastern United States
  • condiment -  a preparation (a sauce or relish or spice) to enhance flavor or enjoyment
  • Confetti -  small pieces or streamers of colored paper that are thrown around on festive occasions (as at a wedding)
  • cooking -  the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat
  • Cooking apple -  an apple used primarily in cooking for pies and applesauce etc
  • cooperative -  done with or working with others for a common purpose or benefit; willing to adjust to differences in order to obtain agreement; involving the joint activity of two or more;  a jointly owned commercial enterprise (usually organized by farmers or consumers) that produces and distributes goods and services and is run for the benefit of its owners; an association formed and operated for the benefit of those using it
  • Copaiba -  an oleoresin used in varnishes and ointments
  • Coptis -  small genus of low perennial herbs having yellow rhizomes and white or yellow flowers
  • Corchorus -  widely distributed genus of tropical herbs or subshrubs; especially Asia; any of various plants of the genus Corchorus having large leaves and cymose clusters of yellow flowers; a source of jute
  • Cordia -  tropical deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs of the family Boraginaceae
  • Cordyline australis -  elegant tree having either a single trunk or a branching trunk each with terminal clusters of long narrow leaves and large panicles of fragrant white, yellow or red flowers; New Zealand
  • Coriander -  parsley-like herb used as seasoning or garnish; dried coriander seeds used whole or ground; Old World herb with aromatic leaves and seed resembling parsley
  • Corn oil -  oil from the germs of corn grains
  • Corncob -  the hard cylindrical core that bears the kernels of an ear of corn
  • Cornus -  a rosid dicot genus of the family Cornaceae including: dogwood; cornel: perennial chiefly deciduous shrubs or small trees of temperate regions of northern hemisphere
  • Cornus mas -  deciduous European shrub or small tree having bright red fruit
  • Coronation -  the ceremony of installing a new monarch
  • Cortland -  large apple with a red skin
  • Corylus cornuta -  hazel of western United States with conspicuous beaklike involucres on the nuts
  • Cotoneaster -  any shrub of the genus Cotoneaster: erect or creeping shrubs having richly colored autumn foliage and many small white to pinkish flowers followed by tiny red or black fruits
  • Cotoneaster -  any shrub of the genus Cotoneaster: erect or creeping shrubs having richly colored autumn foliage and many small white to pinkish flowers followed by tiny red or black fruits
  • Cotton -  fabric woven from cotton fibers; thread made of cotton fibers; erect bushy mallow plant or small tree bearing bolls containing seeds with many long hairy fibers; soft silky fibers from cotton plants in their raw state;  take a liking to
  • Cotton gin -  a machine that separates the seeds from raw cotton fibers
  • Cotton mill -  a textile mill for making cotton textiles
  • Cotton wool -  soft silky fibers from cotton plants in their raw state
  • Cottonseed -  seed of cotton plants; source of cottonseed oil
  • Cover crop -  crop planted to prevent soil erosion and provide green manure
  • Cowpea -  sprawling Old World annual cultivated especially in southern United States for food and forage and green manure; fruit or seed of the cowpea plant; eaten fresh as shell beans or dried
  • Crabapple -  small sour apple; suitable for preserving; any of numerous wild apple trees usually with small acid fruit; any of numerous varieties of crab apples cultivated for their small acid (usually bright red) fruit used for preserving or as ornamentals for their blossoms
  • Crambe maritima -  perennial of coastal sands and shingles of northern Europe and Baltic and Black Seas having racemes of small white flowers and large fleshy blue-green leaves often used as potherbs
  • Cranberry -  very tart red berry used for sauce or juice; any of numerous shrubs of genus Vaccinium bearing cranberries
  • Cranberry juice -  the juice of cranberries (always diluted and sweetened)
  • Crash -  the act of colliding with something; a serious accident (usually involving one or more vehicles); a sudden large decline of business or the prices of stocks (especially one that causes additional failures); (computer science) an event that causes a computer system to become inoperative; a loud resonant repeating noise;  stop operating; undergo a sudden and severe downturn; hurl or thrust violently; undergo damage or destruction on impact; break violently or noisily; smash; cause to crash; fall or come down violently; move violently as through a barrier; move with, or as if with, a crashing noise; occupy, usually uninvited; sleep in a convenient place; enter uninvited; informal
  • Crataegus -  thorny shrubs and small trees: hawthorn; thorn; thorn apple
  • Crataegus -  thorny shrubs and small trees: hawthorn; thorn; thorn apple
  • Crescentia -  a genus of tropical American trees of the family Bignoniaceae; has a short trunk and crooked limbs and drooping branches
  • Crisp -  brief and to the point; effectively cut short; (of something seen or heard) clearly defined; of hair in small tight curls; pleasingly firm and fresh and making a crunching noise when chewed; pleasantly cold and invigorating; tender and brittle;  a thin crisp slice of potato fried in deep fat;  make brown and crisp by heating; make wrinkles or creases into a smooth surface
  • Croton oil -  viscid acrid brownish-yellow oil from the seeds of Croton tiglium having a violent cathartic action
  • Crumble -  break or fall apart into fragments; fall apart; fall into decay or ruin
  • Cryptocoryne -  any plant of the genus Cryptocoryne; evergreen perennials growing in fresh or brackish water; tropical Asia
  • Cucumber -  cylindrical green fruit with thin green rind and white flesh eaten as a vegetable; related to melons; a melon vine of the genus Cucumis; cultivated from earliest times for its cylindrical green fruit
  • cucurbit -  any plant of the family Cucurbitaceae
  • Cucurbita -  type genus of the Cucurbitaceae
  • Cucurbita argyrosperma -  plant bearing squash having globose to ovoid fruit with variously striped grey and green and white warty rinds
  • Cucurbita pepo -  a coarse vine widely cultivated for its large pulpy round orange fruit with firm orange skin and numerous seeds; subspecies of Cucurbita pepo include the summer squashes and a few autumn squashes
  • Cultivar -  a variety of a plant developed from a natural species and maintained under cultivation
  • Cunningham -  United States dancer and choreographer (born in 1922)
  • Curio -  something unusual -- perhaps worthy of collecting
  • Curry powder -  pungent blend of cumin and ground coriander seed and turmeric and other spices
  • Cycloloma -  a caryophyllaceous genus of the family Chenopodiaceae
  • Cynodon dactylon -  trailing grass native to Europe now cosmopolitan in warm regions; used for lawns and pastures especially in southern United States and India
  • Cyperus papyrus -  tall sedge of the Nile valley yielding fiber that served many purposes in historic times
  • Cyperus rotundus -  a widely distributed perennial sedge having small edible nutlike tubers
  • Dahlia -  any of several plants of or developed from the species Dahlia pinnata having tuberous roots and showy rayed variously colored flower heads; native to the mountains of Mexico and Central America and Colombia
  • Daikon -  radish of Japan with a long hard durable root eaten raw or cooked
  • Damping off -  a plant disease caused by a fungus; diseased condition of seedlings in excessive moisture
  • Damson -  sweet dark purple plum
  • Date palm -  tall tropical feather palm tree native to Syria bearing sweet edible fruit
  • Date plum -  an Asiatic persimmon tree cultivated for its small yellow or purplish-black edible fruit much valued by Afghan tribes
  • Daylily -  any of numerous perennials having tuberous roots and long narrow bladelike leaves and usually yellow lilylike flowers that bloom for only a day
  • Death -  the act of killing; the event of dying or departure from life; the personification of death; the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; the absence of life or state of being dead; the time at which life ends; continuing until dead; the time when something ends; a final state
  • Debit -  an accounting entry acknowledging sums that are owing;  enter as debit
  • Defoliant -  a chemical that is sprayed on plants and causes their leaves to fall off
  • Deforestation -  the removal of trees; the state of being clear of trees
  • Delaware -  the Algonquian language spoken by the Delaware; a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies; one of the British colonies that formed the United States; a river that rises in the Catskills in southeastern New York and flows southward along the border of Pennsylvania with New York and New Jersey to northern Delaware where it empties into Delaware Bay; a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in New Jersey and New York and parts of Delaware and Pennsylvania
  • Dendrobium -  a plant of the genus Dendrobium having stems like cane and usually showy racemose flowers
  • Dent corn -  corn whose kernels contain both hard and soft starch and become indented at maturity
  • Descurainia pinnata -  North American herb with bitter-tasting pinnate leaves resembling those of tansy
  • Desmanthus -  genus of American herbs or shrubs with sensitive pinnate leaves and small whitish flowers
  • dessert -  a dish served as the last course of a meal
  • Diatomaceous earth -  a light soil consisting of siliceous diatom remains and often used as a filtering material
  • Diesel -  an internal-combustion engine that burns heavy oil; German engineer (born in France) who invented the diesel engine (1858-1913)
  • Digitalis -  a powerful cardiac stimulant obtained from foxglove; any of several plants of the genus Digitalis
  • Diospyros -  a genus of trees or shrubs that have beautiful and valuable wood
  • Diospyros kaki -  small deciduous Asiatic tree bearing large red or orange edible astringent fruit
  • Diospyros virginiana -  medium-sized tree of dry woodlands in the southern and eastern United States bearing yellow or orange very astringent fruit that is edible when fully ripe
  • Diplotaxis tenuifolia -  yellow-flowered European plant that grows on old walls and in waste places; an adventive weed in North America
  • Dipteryx odorata -  tall tropical South American tree having pulpy egg-shaped pods of fragrant black almond-shaped seeds used for flavoring
  • Discovery -  the act of discovering something; a productive insight; something that is discovered; (law) compulsory pretrial disclosure of documents relevant to a case; enables one side in a litigation to elicit information from the other side concerning the facts in the case
  • disease -  an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
  • Distaff -  characteristic of or peculiar to a woman;  the staff on which wool or flax is wound before spinning; the sphere of work by women
  • Dottle -  the residue of partially burnt tobacco left caked in the bowl of a pipe after smoking
  • Dovyalis caffra -  vigorous South African spiny shrub grown for its round yellow juicy edible fruits
  • Drimys winteri -  South American evergreen tree yielding winter's bark and a light soft wood similar to basswood
  • Duncan -  United States dancer and pioneer of modern dance (1878-1927)
  • Durian -  huge fruit native to southeastern Asia `smelling like Hell and tasting like Heaven'; seeds are roasted and eaten like nuts; tree of southeastern Asia having edible oval fruit with a hard spiny rind
  • Durio zibethinus -  tree of southeastern Asia having edible oval fruit with a hard spiny rind
  • Eccles cake -  a flat round cake of sweetened pastry filled with dried fruit
  • Echinocereus -  large genus of low-growing shrubby ribbed cacti of Mexico and southwestern United States
  • Echium vulgare -  a coarse prickly European weed with spikes of blue flowers; naturalized in United States
  • Edelweiss -  alpine perennial plant native to Europe having leaves covered with whitish down and small flower heads held in stars of glistening whitish bracts
  • Edward -  son of Edward III who defeated the French at Crecy and Poitiers in the Hundred Years' War (1330-1376); third son of Elizabeth II (born in 1964); King of England from 1272 to 1307; conquered Wales (1239-1307); King of England from 1307 to 1327 and son of Edward I; was defeated at Bannockburn by the Scots led by Robert the Bruce; was deposed and died in prison (1284-1327); son of Edward II and King of England from 1327-1377; his claim to the French throne provoked the Hundred Years' War; his reign was marked by an epidemic of the Black Plague and by the emergence of the House of Commons as the powerful arm of British Parliament (1312-1377); King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483; was dethroned in 1470 but regained the throne in 1471 by his victory at the battle of Tewkesbury (1442-1483); King of England who was crowned at the age of 13 on the death of his father Edward IV but was immediately confined to the Tower of London where he and his younger brother were murdered (1470-1483); King of England and Ireland from 1547 to 1553; son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour; died of tuberculosis (1537-1553); King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910); King of England and Ireland in 1936; his marriage to Wallis Warfield Simpson created a constitutional crisis leading to his abdication (1894-1972)
  • Edwin -  king of Northumbria who was converted to Christianity (585-633)
  • Eggplant -  egg-shaped vegetable having a shiny skin typically dark purple but occasionally white or yellow; hairy upright herb native to southeastern Asia but widely cultivated for its large glossy edible fruit commonly used as a vegetable
  • Eleusine coracana -  East Indian cereal grass whose seed yield a somewhat bitter flour, a staple in the Orient
  • Eli Whitney -  United States inventor of the mechanical cotton gin (1765-1825)
  • Emmenagogue -  any agent that promotes menstrual discharge
  • Empire -  an eating apple that somewhat resembles a McIntosh; used as both an eating and a cooking apple; a group of countries under a single authority; a monarchy with an emperor as head of state; the domain ruled by an emperor or empress; the region over which imperial dominion is exercised; a group of diverse companies under common ownership and run as a single organization
  • Endive -  widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched; variety of endive having leaves with irregular frilled edges
  • Engels -  socialist who wrote the Communist Manifesto with Karl Marx in 1848 (1820-1895)
  • Ensete -  Old World tropical herbs: Abyssinian bananas
  • Ensete ventricosum -  large evergreen arborescent herb having huge paddle-shaped leaves and bearing inedible fruit that resemble bananas but edible young flower shoots; sometimes placed in genus Musa
  • Enterprise -  a purposeful or industrious undertaking (especially one that requires effort or boldness); readiness to embark on bold new ventures; an organization created for business ventures
  • Epimedium -  herbaceous perennials of Mediterranean to India and eastern Asia
  • Erica -  any plant of the genus Erica
  • Erodium cicutarium -  European weed naturalized in southwestern United States and Mexico having reddish decumbent stems with small fernlike leaves and small deep reddish-lavender flowers followed by slender fruits that stick straight up; often grown for forage
  • Erodium moschatum -  low annual European herb naturalized in America; similar to alfilaria
  • Erythrina -  any of various shrubs or shrubby trees of the genus Erythrina having trifoliate leaves and racemes of scarlet to coral red flowers and black seeds; cultivated as an ornamental
  • Erythronium -  perennial bulbous herbs most of northern United States: dogtooth violet; adder's tongue; trout lily; fawn lily
  • Espadrille -  a sandal with a sole made of rope or rubber and a cloth upper part
  • Eucalyptus -  a tree of the genus Eucalyptus; wood of any of various eucalyptus trees valued as timber
  • Eucalyptus globulus -  tall fast-growing timber tree with leaves containing a medicinal oil; young leaves are bluish
  • Euphorbia -  type genus of the Euphorbiaceae: very large genus of diverse plants all having milky juice
  • fabric -  artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; the underlying structure
  • Fagopyrum -  buckwheat; in some classifications included in the genus Polygonum
  • Fagopyrum esculentum -  a member of the genus Fagopyrum; annual Asian plant with clusters of small pinkish white flowers and small edible triangular seeds which are used whole or ground into flour
  • Fagus grandifolia -  North American forest tree with light green leaves and edible nuts
  • Fagus sylvatica -  large European beech with minutely-toothed leaves; widely planted as an ornamental in North America
  • fashion -  characteristic or habitual practice; consumer goods (especially clothing) in the current mode; the latest and most admired style in clothes and cosmetics and behavior; how something is done or how it happens;  make out of components (often in an improvising manner)
  • Fava bean -  shell beans cooked as lima beans; seed of the broad-bean plant
  • Fennel -  fennel seeds are ground and used as a spice or as an ingredient of a spice mixture; leaves used for seasoning; aromatic bulbous stem base eaten cooked or raw in salads; any of several aromatic herbs having edible seeds and leaves and stems
  • Fenugreek -  aromatic seeds used as seasoning especially in curry; annual herb or southern Europe and eastern Asia having off-white flowers and aromatic seeds used medicinally and in curry
  • Festuca ovina -  cultivated for sheep pasturage in upland regions or used as a lawn grass
  • Ficus carica -  Mediterranean tree widely cultivated for its edible fruit
  • Ficus sycomorus -  thick-branched wide-spreading tree of Africa and adjacent southwestern Asia often buttressed with branches rising from near the ground; produces cluster of edible but inferior figs on short leafless twigs; the biblical sycamore
  • Fiddlehead fern -  New World fern having woolly cinnamon-colored spore-bearing fronds in early spring later surrounded by green fronds; the early uncurling fronds are edible
  • Field corn -  corn grown primarily for animal feed or market grain
  • Field pea -  coarse small-seeded pea often used as food when young and tender; variety of pea plant native to the Mediterranean region and North Africa and widely grown especially for forage; seed of the field pea plant
  • Fiesta -  an elaborate party (often outdoors)
  • Finland -  republic in northern Europe; achieved independence from Russia in 1917
  • Five spice powder -  Chinese seasoning made by grinding star anise and fennel and pepper and cloves and cinnamon
  • Flacourtia indica -  small shrubby tree of Madagascar cultivated in tropical regions as a hedge plant and for its deep red acid fruits resembling small plums
  • Flamenco -  a style of dancing characteristic of the Andalusian Gypsies; vigorous and rhythmic with clapping and stamping of feet; guitar music composed for dancing the flamenco
  • flavour -  the taste experience when a savoury condiment is taken into the mouth; (physics) the six kinds of quarks; the general atmosphere of a place or situation and the effect that it has on people;  lend flavor to
  • Flint corn -  corn having kernels with a hard outer layer enclosing the soft endosperm
  • Flora -  a living organism lacking the power of locomotion; all the plant life in a particular region or period
  • Florida arrowroot -  small tough woody zamia of Florida and West Indies and Cuba; roots and half-buried stems yield an arrowroot
  • Flour corn -  corn having kernels almost entirely of soft starch
  • Fodder -  coarse food (especially for cattle and horses) composed of entire plants or the leaves and stalks of a cereal crop;  give fodder (to domesticated animals)
  • Forage -  the act of searching for food and provisions; animal food for browsing or grazing;  wander and feed; collect or look around for (food)
  • Forbidden fruit -  originally an apple from the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden; it is now used to refer to anything that is tempting but dangerous (as sexuality)
  • Forsythia -  any of various early blooming oleaceous shrubs of the genus Forsythia; native to eastern Asia and southern Europe but widely cultivated for their branches of bright yellow bell-shaped flowers
  • Fragaria chiloensis -  wild strawberry of western United States and South America; source of many varieties of cultivated strawberries
  • Fragaria virginiana -  North American wild strawberry with sweet scarlet fruit; a source of many cultivated strawberries
  • Framboise -  the common European raspberry; fruit red or orange
  • Frankincense -  an aromatic gum resin obtained from various Arabian or East African trees; formerly valued for worship and for embalming and fumigation
  • Fricassee -  pieces of chicken or other meat stewed in gravy with e.g. carrots and onions and served with noodles or dumplings;  make a fricassee of by cooking
  • Fritillaria affinis -  herb of northwestern America having green-and-purple bell-shaped flowers
  • Fruitcake -  a rich cake containing dried fruit and nuts and citrus peel and so on; a whimsically eccentric person
  • Fuchsia -  a dark purple-red; the dye was discovered in 1859, the year of the battle of Magenta; any of various tropical shrubs widely cultivated for their showy drooping purplish or reddish or white flowers; Central and South America and New Zealand and Tahiti
  • Fumigation -  the application of a gas or smoke to something for the purpose of disinfecting it
  • fungus -  a parasitic plant lacking chlorophyll and leaves and true stems and roots and reproducing by spores
  • Fustian -  a strong cotton and linen fabric with a slight nap; pompous or pretentious talk or writing
  • Gaillardia -  any plant of western America of the genus Gaillardia having hairy leaves and long-stalked flowers in hot vibrant colors from golden yellow and copper to rich burgundy
  • Galangal -  southeastern Asian perennial with aromatic roots; European sedge having rough-edged leaves and spikelets of reddish flowers and aromatic roots
  • Galbanum -  a bitter aromatic gum resin that resembles asafetida
  • Galium -  annual or perennial herbs: bedstraw; cleavers
  • Galium odoratum -  Old World fragrant stoloniferous perennial having small white flowers and narrow leaves used as flavoring and in sachets; widely cultivated as a ground cover; in some classifications placed in genus Asperula
  • Garlic -  aromatic bulb used as seasoning; bulbous herb of southern Europe widely naturalized; bulb breaks up into separate strong-flavored cloves
  • gastropod -  a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
  • Gaultheria hispidula -  slow-growing procumbent evergreen shrublet of northern North America and Japan having white flowers and numerous white fleshy rough and hairy seeds
  • Gaultheria procumbens -  creeping shrub of eastern North America having white bell-shaped flowers followed by spicy red berrylike fruit and shiny aromatic leaves that yield wintergreen oil
  • Gaultheria shallon -  small evergreen shrub of Pacific coast of North America having edible dark purple grape-size berries
  • Gaylussacia baccata -  low shrub of the eastern United States bearing shiny black edible fruit; best known of the huckleberries
  • Geisha -  a Japanese woman trained to entertain men with conversation and singing and dancing
  • genetics -  the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
  • Geranium -  any of numerous plants of the family Geraniaceae
  • Ginger -  (used especially of hair or fur) having a bright orange-brown color;  pungent rhizome of the common ginger plant; used fresh as a seasoning especially in Oriental cookery; dried ground gingerroot; perennial plants having thick branching aromatic rhizomes and leafy reedlike stems; liveliness and energy;  add ginger to in order to add flavor
  • Ginkgo biloba -  deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; exists almost exclusively in cultivation especially as an ornamental street tree
  • Ginseng -  Chinese herb with palmately compound leaves and small greenish flowers and forked aromatic roots believed to have medicinal powers; aromatic root of ginseng plants
  • Gladiolus -  the large central part of the breastbone; any of numerous plants of the genus Gladiolus native chiefly to tropical and South Africa having sword-shaped leaves and one-sided spikes of brightly colored funnel-shaped flowers; widely cultivated
  • Glasswort -  fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and small spikes of minute flowers; formerly used in making glass; bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to produce a crude soda ash
  • Glenn -  made the first orbital rocket-powered flight by a United States astronaut in 1962; later in United States Senate (1921-)
  • Glycine max -  erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
  • Gnetum gnemon -  small tropical tree with tiered branches and divaricate branchlets having broad glossy dark green leaves; exploited for its edible young leaves and seeds that provide a fine flour
  • Goethe -  German poet and novelist and dramatist who lived in Weimar (1749-1832)
  • Golden Star -  California plant having grasslike leaves and showy orange flowers
  • Gossypium -  herbs and shrubs and small trees: cotton
  • Gossypium arboreum -  East Indian shrub cultivated especially for ornament for its pale yellow to deep purple blossoms
  • Gossypium barbadense -  small bushy tree grown on islands of the Caribbean and off the Atlantic coast of the southern United States; yields cotton with unusually long silky fibers
  • Gossypium herbaceum -  Old World annual having heart-shaped leaves and large seeds with short greyish lint removed with difficulty; considered an ancestor of modern short-staple cottons
  • Gossypium hirsutum -  native tropical American plant now cultivated in the United States yielding short-staple cotton
  • Graham -  United States dancer and choreographer whose work was noted for its austerity and technical rigor (1893-1991); United States evangelical preacher famous as a mass evangelist (born in 1918); flour made by grinding the entire wheat berry including the bran; (`whole meal flour' is British usage)
  • Granny Smith -  apple with a green skin and hard tart flesh
  • Granola -  cereal made of especially rolled oats with dried fruits and nuts and honey or brown sugar
  • Grapefruit -  large yellow fruit with somewhat acid juicy pulp; usual serving consists of a half; citrus tree bearing large round edible fruit having a thick yellow rind and juicy somewhat acid pulp
  • Green bean -  immature bean pod eaten as a vegetable; a common bean plant cultivated for its slender green edible pods
  • Green manure -  a growing crop that is plowed under to enrich soil
  • Greengage -  sweet green or greenish-yellow variety of plum
  • Grenadier -  deep-sea fish with a large head and body and long tapering tail; an infantryman equipped with grenades
  • Grevillea -  any shrub or tree of the genus Grevillea
  • Grifola frondosa -  large greyish-brown edible fungus forming a mass of overlapping caps that somewhat resembles a hen at the base of trees
  • Guacamole -  a dip made of mashed avocado mixed with chopped onions and other seasonings
  • Guess -  an estimate based on little or no information; a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence;  guess correctly; solve by guessing; put forward, of a guess, in spite of possible refutation; expect, believe, or suppose; judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time)
  • Gum arabic -  gum from an acacia tree; used as a thickener (especially in candies and pharmaceuticals)
  • Gummosis -  pathological production of gummy exudates in citrus and various stone-fruit trees; disease of citrus trees caused by the fungus Phytophthora citrophthora
  • Gymnadenia -  small genus of terrestrial orchids of North America and temperate Eurasia
  • Haematoxylum campechianum -  spiny shrub or small tree of Central America and West Indies having bipinnate leaves and racemes of small bright yellow flowers and yielding a hard brown or brownish-red heartwood used in preparing a black dye
  • Halo blight -  a blight of bean plants; a blight affecting the leaves of oats and other grasses
  • Hamamelis -  deciduous shrubs or small trees: witch hazel
  • Hardiness -  the trait of being willing to undertake things that involve risk or danger; the property of being strong and healthy in constitution
  • Hardy -  able to survive under unfavorable conditions; having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships; resolute and without fear;  English novelist and poet (1840-1928); United States slapstick comedian who played the pompous and oearing member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1892-1957)
  • Harris -  publisher of the first newspaper printed in America (1673-1713); British marshal of the Royal Air Force; during World War II he directed mass bombing raids against German cities that resulted in heavy civilian casualties (1892-1984); Irish writer noted for his sexually explicit but unreliable autobiography (1856-1931); United States diplomat who was instrumental in opening Japan to foreign trade (1804-1878)
  • Hazelnut -  nut of any of several trees of the genus Corylus; any of several shrubs or small trees of the genus Corylus bearing edible nuts enclosed in a leafy husk
  • Heckling -  shouting to interrupt a speech with which you disagree
  • Helianthus -  any plant of the genus Helianthus having large flower heads with dark disk florets and showy yellow rays
  • Helianthus -  any plant of the genus Helianthus having large flower heads with dark disk florets and showy yellow rays
  • Helianthus annuus -  annual sunflower grown for silage and for its seeds which are a source of oil; common throughout United States and much of North America
  • Herbert -  United States musician and composer and conductor noted for his comic operas (1859-1924)
  • Heritage -  practices that are handed down from the past by tradition; hereditary succession to a title or an office or property; any attribute or immaterial possession that is inherited from ancestors; that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner
  • Hevea brasiliensis -  deciduous tree of the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers having leathery leaves and fragrant yellow-white flowers; the rubber tree usually cultivated in plantations; chief source of Para rubber
  • Hibernal -  characteristic of or relating to winter
  • Hickory -  American hardwood tree bearing edible nuts; valuable tough heavy hardwood from various hickory trees
  • hieroglyph -  a writing system using picture symbols; used in ancient Egypt; writing that resembles hieroglyphics (usually by being illegible)
  • High-rise -  used of buildings of many stories equipped with elevators; tall;  tower consisting of a multistoried building of offices or apartments
  • Hominy -  hulled corn with the bran and germ removed
  • Honey locust -  tall usually spiny North American tree having small greenish-white flowers in drooping racemes followed by long twisting seed pods; yields very hard durable reddish-brown wood; introduced to temperate Old World
  • Honeydew -  the fruit of a variety of winter melon vine; a large smooth greenish-white melon with pale green flesh
  • Hookah -  an oriental tobacco pipe with a long flexible tube connected to a container where the smoke is cooled by passing through water
  • Hordeum pusillum -  annual barley native to western North America and widespread in southern United States and tropical America
  • Horseradish -  grated horseradish root; coarse Eurasian plant cultivated for its thick white pungent root; the root of the horseradish plant; it is grated or ground and used for seasoning
  • Huckleberry -  blue-black berry similar to blueberries and bilberries of the eastern United States; any of several shrubs of the genus Gaylussacia bearing small berries resembling blueberries; any of various dark-fruited as distinguished from blue-fruited blueberries
  • Humulus -  hops: hardy perennial vines of Europe, North America and central and eastern Asia producing a latex sap; in some classifications included in the family Urticaceae
  • Hyacinthoides -  small genus of perennial bulbs of western Europe and North Africa; sometimes placed in family Hyacinthaceae
  • Hypericum perforatum -  yellow-flowered perennial common in fields and waste places but a weed in rangelands
  • Hypochaeris radicata -  European weed widely naturalized in North America having yellow flower heads and leaves resembling a cat's ears
  • Hyssopus -  Eurasian genus of perennial herbs or subshrubs
  • Hyssopus officinalis -  a European mint with aromatic and pungent leaves used in perfumery and as a seasoning in cookery; often cultivated as a remedy for bruises; yields hyssop oil
  • ice cream -  frozen dessert containing cream and sugar and flavoring
  • Ice Cream -  frozen dessert containing cream and sugar and flavoring
  • Iceberg lettuce -  lettuce with crisp tightly packed light-green leaves in a firm head
  • Ilama -  whitish tropical fruit with a pinkish tinge related to custard apples; grown in the southern United States; tropical American tree grown in southern United States having a whitish pink-tinged fruit
  • Illicium anisatum -  small shrubby tree of Japan and Taiwan; flowers are not fragrant
  • Illicium verum -  small tree of China and Vietnam bearing anise-scented star-shaped fruit used in food and medicinally as a carminative
  • Incense -  the pleasing scent produced when incense is burned; a substance that produces a fragrant odor when burned;  make furious; perfume especially with a censer
  • Indian lettuce -  a plant of the genus Montia having edible pleasant-tasting leaves
  • industrial -  suitable to stand up to hard wear; having highly developed industries; employed in industry; of or relating to or resulting from industry; employed in industry
  • Inga edulis -  ornamental evergreen tree with masses of white flowers; tropical and subtropical America
  • inventor -  someone who is the first to think of or make something
  • Irvingia gabonensis -  African tree with edible yellow fruit resembling mangos; valued for its oil-rich seed and hardy green wood that resists termites
  • Isabella -  the queen of Castile whose marriage to Ferdinand of Aragon in 1469 marked the beginning of the modern state of Spain; they instituted the Spanish Inquisition in 1478 and sponsored the voyages of Christopher Columbus in 1492 (1451-1504)
  • Isoetes -  type and genus of the Isoetaceae and sole extant genus of the order Isoetales
  • Italia -  a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
  • Ivory -  a hard smooth ivory colored dentine that makes up most of the tusks of elephants and walruses; a shade of white the color of bleached bones
  • Jack-o-lantern -  a large poisonous agaric with orange caps and narrow clustered stalks; the gills are luminescent
  • Jackfruit -  immense East Indian fruit resembling breadfruit; it contains an edible pulp and nutritious seeds that are commonly roasted; East Indian tree cultivated for its immense edible fruit and seeds
  • Jaeger -  rapacious seabird that pursues weaker birds to make them drop their prey
  • Jakarta -  capital and largest city of Indonesia; located on the island of Java; founded by the Dutch in 17th century
  • Japanese radish -  radish of Japan with a long hard durable root eaten raw or cooked
  • japonica -  deciduous thorny shrub native to Japan having red blossoms; greenhouse shrub with glossy green leaves and showy fragrant roselike flowers; cultivated in many varieties
  • Jasmine -  any of several shrubs and vines of the genus Jasminum chiefly native to Asia
  • Jerusalem artichoke -  sunflower tuber eaten raw or boiled or sliced thin and fried as Saratoga chips; tall perennial with hairy stems and leaves; widely cultivated for its large irregular edible tubers; edible tuber of the Jerusalem artichoke
  • Johnny Appleseed -  United States pioneer who planted apple trees as he traveled (1774-1845)
  • Johnson grass -  tall perennial grass that spreads by creeping rhizomes and is grown for fodder; naturalized in southern United States where it is a serious pest on cultivated land
  • Jonathan -  red late-ripening apple; primarily eaten raw
  • Joss stick -  a slender stick of incense burned before a joss by the Chinese
  • journal -  the part of the axle contained by a bearing; a record book as a physical object; a periodical dedicated to a particular subject; a daily written record of (usually personal) experiences and observations; a ledger in which transactions have been recorded as they occurred
  • Juglans -  type genus of the Juglandaceae
  • Juglans californica -  medium-sized tree with somewhat aromatic compound leaves and edible nuts
  • Juglans cinerea -  North American walnut tree having light-brown wood and edible nuts; source of a light-brown dye
  • Juglans nigra -  North American walnut tree with hard dark wood and edible nut
  • Juglans regia -  Eurasian walnut valued for its large edible nut and its hard richly figured wood; widely cultivated
  • Jujube -  chewy fruit-flavored jellied candy (sometimes medicated to soothe a sore throat); dark red plumlike fruit of Old World buckthorn trees; spiny tree having dark red edible fruits
  • Juniper berry -  berrylike fruit of a plant of the genus Juniperus especially the berrylike cone of the common juniper
  • Juniperus communis -  densely branching shrub or small tree having pungent blue berries used to flavor gin; widespread in northern hemisphere; only conifer on coasts of Iceland and Greenland
  • Jupiter -  the largest planet and the 5th from the sun; has many satellites and is one of the brightest objects in the night sky; (Roman mythology) supreme god of Romans; counterpart of Greek Zeus
  • Kaiser roll -  rounded raised poppy-seed roll made of a square piece of dough by folding the corners in to the center
  • Key lime -  small yellow-green limes of southern Florida
  • Kidney bean -  large dark red bean; usually dried; the common bean plant grown for the beans rather than the pods (especially a variety with large red kidney-shaped beans)
  • Kohlrabi -  fleshy turnip-shaped edible stem of the kohlrabi plant; plant cultivated for its enlarged fleshy turnip-shaped edible stem
  • Kola nut -  bitter brown seed containing caffein; source of cola extract; tree bearing large brown nuts containing e.g. caffeine; source of cola extract
  • Komodo Dragon -  the largest lizard in the world (10 feet); found on Indonesian islands
  • Kumquat -  small oval citrus fruit with thin sweet rind and very acid pulp; any of several trees or shrubs of the genus Fortunella bearing small orange-colored edible fruits with thick sweet-flavored skin and sour pulp
  • La Crosse -  a town in western Wisconsin on the Mississippi River
  • Labdanum -  a soft blackish-brown resinous exudate from various rockroses used in perfumes especially as a fixative; a dark brown to greenish oleoresin that has a fragrant odor and is used as a fixative in perfumes; obtained as a juice from certain rockroses
  • Lablab -  one species: hyacinth bean
  • Lablab purpureus -  perennial twining vine of Old World tropics having trifoliate leaves and racemes of fragrant purple pea-like flowers followed by maroon pods of edible seeds; grown as an ornamental and as a vegetable on the Indian subcontinent; sometimes placed in genus Dolichos
  • Laburnum -  flowering shrubs or trees having bright yellow flowers; all parts of the plant are poisonous
  • Lactuca serriola -  European annual wild lettuce having prickly stems; a troublesome weed in parts of United States
  • Latakia -  aromatic Turkish tobacco; a seaport on the western coast of Syria
  • Lathyrus japonicus -  wild pea of seashores of north temperate zone having tough roots and purple flowers and useful as a sand binder
  • Lathyrus sativus -  European annual grown for forage; seeds used for food in India and for stock elsewhere
  • Lathyrus tuberosus -  European herb bearing small tubers used for food and in Scotland to flavor whiskey
  • Laurus nobilis -  small Mediterranean evergreen tree with small blackish berries and glossy aromatic leaves used for flavoring in cooking; also used by ancient Greeks to crown victors
  • Lavandula angustifolia -  aromatic Mediterranean shrub widely cultivated for its lilac flowers which are dried and used in sachets
  • Lavandula latifolia -  Mediterranean plant with pale purple flowers that yields spike lavender oil
  • Leaf scorch -  plant disease causing a burned or scorched appearance of the foliage
  • Legume -  the seedpod of a leguminous plant (such as peas or beans or lentils); an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae; the fruit or seed of any of various bean or pea plants consisting of a case that splits along both sides when ripe and having the seeds attach to one side of the case
  • Lemon balm -  lemony leaves used for a tisane or in soups or fruit punches; bushy perennial Old World mint having small white or yellowish flowers and fragrant lemon-flavored leaves; a garden escapee in northern Europe and North America
  • Lemon mint -  an annual horsemint of central and western United States and northern Mexico; mint with leaves having perfume like that of the bergamot orange
  • Lens culinaris -  widely cultivated Eurasian annual herb grown for its edible flattened seeds that are cooked like peas and also ground into meal and for its leafy stalks that are used as fodder
  • Lentil -  round flat seed of the lentil plant used for food; widely cultivated Eurasian annual herb grown for its edible flattened seeds that are cooked like peas and also ground into meal and for its leafy stalks that are used as fodder; the fruit or seed of a lentil plant
  • Lettuce -  leaves of any of various plants of Lactuca sativa; any of various plants of the genus Lactuca; informal terms for money
  • Leucaena leucocephala -  low scrubby tree of tropical and subtropical North America having white flowers tinged with yellow resembling mimosa and long flattened pods
  • Leucanthemum -  comprises plants often included in the genus Chrysanthemum
  • Leucanthemum vulgare -  tall leafy-stemmed Eurasian perennial with white flowers; widely naturalized; often placed in genus Chrysanthemum
  • Levi-Strauss -  French cultural anthropologist who promoted structural analysis of social systems (born in 1908)
  • Levi-Strauss -  French cultural anthropologist who promoted structural analysis of social systems (born in 1908)
  • Lewisia -  genus of western North American low-growing herbs having linear woolly leaves and large pink flowers
  • Liberty -  freedom of choice; personal freedom from servitude or confinement or oppression; an act of undue intimacy; immunity from arbitrary exercise of authority: political independence; leave granted to a sailor or naval officer
  • Lilium -  type genus of Liliaceae
  • Lilium canadense -  common lily of the eastern United States having nodding yellow or reddish flowers spotted with brown
  • Lilium columbianum -  lily of western North America with showy orange-red purple-spotted flowers
  • Lilium lancifolium -  east Asian perennial having large reddish-orange black-spotted flowers with reflexed petals
  • Lima bean -  broad flat beans simmered gently; never eaten raw; bush or tall-growing bean plant having large flat edible seeds; bush bean plant cultivated especially in southern United States having small flat edible seeds
  • Linnaea -  one species: twinflower
  • Linseed oil -  a drying oil extracted from flax seed and used in making such things as oil paints
  • liqueur -  strong highly flavored sweet liquor usually drunk after a meal
  • Liquorice -  a black candy flavored with the dried root of the licorice plant; deep-rooted coarse-textured plant native to the Mediterranean region having blue flowers and pinnately compound leaves; widely cultivated in Europe for its long thick sweet roots
  • Little -  small in a way that arouses feelings (of tenderness or its opposite depending on the context); (of a voice) faint; lowercase; (quantifier used with mass s) small in quantity or degree; not much or almost none or (with `a') at least some; (of children and animals) young, immature; (informal) small and of little importance; limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; of short duration or distance;  not much;  a small amount or duration
  • lobata -  ctenophore having tentacles only in the immature stage; body compressed vertically having two large oral lobes and four pointed processes
  • Lobularia maritima -  perennial European plant having clusters of small fragrant usually white flowers; widely grown in gardens
  • Loganberry -  large red variety of the dewberry; red-fruited bramble native from Oregon to Baja California
  • Long pepper -  slender tropical climber of the eastern Himalayas; plant bearing very hot and finely tapering long peppers; usually red
  • Longan -  tree of southeastern Asia to Australia grown primarily for its sweet edible fruit resembling litchi nuts; sometimes placed in genera Euphorbia or Nephelium
  • Loquat -  yellow olive-sized semitropical fruit with a large free stone and relatively little flesh; used for jellies; evergreen tree of warm regions having fuzzy yellow olive-sized fruit with a large free stone; native to China and Japan
  • Louisiana -  a state in southern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
  • Lovage -  stalks eaten like celery or candied like angelica; seeds used for flavoring or pickled like capers; herb native to southern Europe; cultivated for its edible stalks and foliage and seeds
  • Lupinus luteus -  yellow-flowered European lupine cultivated for forage
  • Lychee -  Chinese fruit having a thin brittle shell enclosing a sweet jellylike pulp and a single seed; often dried
  • Lycium barbarum -  deciduous erect or spreading shrub with spiny branches and violet-purple flowers followed by orange-red berries; southeastern Europe to China
  • Macadamia -  any tree of the genus Macadamia
  • Macadamia ternifolia -  small Australian tree with racemes of pink flowers; widely cultivated (especially in Hawaii) for its sweet edible nuts
  • Macrotyloma uniflorum -  twining herb of Old World tropics cultivated in India for food and fodder; sometimes placed in genus Dolichos
  • Madia elegans -  California annual having red-brown spots near the base of its yellow flower rays
  • Magnolia -  any shrub or tree of the genus Magnolia; valued for their longevity and exquisite fragrant blooms; dried bark of various magnolias; used in folk medicine
  • Mahonia -  evergreen shrubs and small trees of North and Central America and Asia
  • Mahonia aquifolium -  ornamental evergreen shrub of Pacific coast of North America having dark green pinnate leaves and racemes of yellow flowers followed by blue-black berries
  • Major -  greater in number or size or amount; greater in scope or effect; of full legal age; of a scale or mode; of the field of academic study in which one concentrates or specializes; of greater importance or stature or rank; of greater seriousness or danger;  the principal field of study of a student at a university; a commissioned military officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines; below lieutenant colonel and above captain; a university student who is studying a particular field as the principal subject; British statesman who was prime minister from 1990 until 1997 (born in 1943);  have as one's principal field of study
  • Malosma -  one species; often included in the genus Rhus
  • Malus -  apple trees; found throughout temperate zones of the northern hemisphere
  • Malus angustifolia -  small tree or shrub of southeastern United States; cultivated as an ornamental for its rose-colored blossoms
  • Malus baccata -  Asian wild crab apple cultivated in many varieties for it small acid usually red fruit used for preserving
  • Malus coronaria -  medium-sized tree of the eastern United States having pink blossoms and small yellow fruit
  • Malus fusca -  small tree or shrub of western United States having white blossoms and tiny yellow or red fruit
  • Malus ioensis -  wild crab apple of western United States with fragrant pink flowers
  • Malus pumila -  native Eurasian tree widely cultivated in many varieties for its firm rounded edible fruits
  • Malus sylvestris -  wild crab apple native to Europe; a chief ancestor of cultivated apples
  • Malva neglecta -  annual Old World plant with clusters of pink or white flowers; naturalized in United States
  • Malva sylvestris -  erect or decumbent Old World perennial with axillary clusters of rosy-purple flowers; introduced in United States
  • Mammea -  American and Asiatic trees having edible one-seeded fruit
  • Manchester -  a city in northwestern England (30 miles east of Liverpool); heart of the most densely populated area of England; largest city in New Hampshire; located in southeastern New Hampshire on the Merrimack river
  • Mandarin orange -  a somewhat flat reddish-orange loose skinned citrus of China; shrub or small tree having flattened globose fruit with very sweet aromatic pulp and thin yellow-orange to flame-orange rind that is loose and easily removed; native to southeastern Asia
  • Mangifera indica -  large evergreen tropical tree cultivated for its large oval fruit
  • Mangosteen -  two- to three-inch tropical fruit with juicy flesh suggestive of both peaches and pineapples; East Indian tree with thick leathery leaves and edible fruit
  • Manila hemp -  a kind of hemp obtained from the abaca plant in the Philippines; Philippine banana tree having leafstalks that yield Manila hemp used for rope and paper etc
  • Manilkara zapota -  large tropical American evergreen yielding chicle gum and edible fruit; sometimes placed in genus Achras
  • manufacturer -  a business engaged in manufacturing some product; someone who manufactures something
  • Manzanita -  chiefly evergreen shrubs of warm dry areas of western North America; evergreen tree of the Pacific coast of North America having glossy leathery leaves and orange-red edible berries; wood used for furniture and bark for tanning
  • Marasca cherry -  Dalmatian bitter wild cherry tree bearing fruit whose juice is made into maraschino liqueur
  • Marihuana -  the most commonly used illicit drug; considered a soft drug, it consists of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect; a strong-smelling plant from whose dried leaves a number of euphoriant and hallucinogenic drugs are prepared
  • Marjoram -  pungent leaves used as seasoning with meats and fowl and in stews and soups and omelets; aromatic Eurasian perennial
  • Marquette -  a town on Lake Superior on the Upper Peninsula in northwest Michigan; French missionary who accompanied Louis Joliet in exploring the upper Mississippi River valley (1637-1675)
  • Marrow -  the fatty network of connective tissue that fills the cavities of bones; large elongated squash with creamy to deep green skins; very tender and very nutritious tissue from marrowbones; any of various squash plants grown for their elongated fruit with smooth dark green skin and whitish flesh; the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience
  • Marrubium vulgare -  European aromatic herb with hairy leaves and numerous white flowers in axillary cymes; leaves yield a bitter extract use medicinally and as flavoring
  • martini -  a cocktail made of gin (or vodka) with dry vermouth
  • Masquerade -  making a false outward show; a party of guests wearing costumes and masks; a costume worn as a disguise at a masquerade party;  pretend to be someone or something that you are not; take part in a masquerade
  • Massasoit -  Wampanoag leader who aided the Pilgrims (1580-1661)
  • Mastic -  an evergreen shrub of the Mediterranean region that is cultivated for its resin; a pasty cement used as an adhesive or filler; an aromatic exudate from the mastic tree; used chiefly in varnishes
  • material -  derived from or composed of matter; directly relevant to a matter especially a law case; concerned with or affecting physical as distinct from intellectual or psychological well-being; concerned with worldly rather than spiritual interests; having substance or capable of being treated as fact; not imaginary; having material or physical form or substance;  things needed for doing or making something; information (data or ideas or observations) that can be used or reworked into a finished form; a person judged suitable for admission or employment; the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers
  • Matteuccia -  small genus sometimes included in genus Onoclea; in some classifications both genera are placed in Polypodiaceae
  • Mayhaw -  hawthorn of southern United States bearing juicy acid scarlet fruit often used in jellies or preserves
  • McIntosh -  early-ripening apple popular in the northeastern United States; primarily eaten raw but suitable for applesauce
  • Medlar -  crabapple-like fruit used for preserves; a South African globular fruit with brown leathery skin and pithy flesh having a sweet-acid taste; small deciduous Eurasian tree cultivated for its fruit that resemble crab apples; small deciduous tree of southern Africa having edible fruit
  • Melba -  Australian operatic soprano (1861-1931)
  • Melilotus -  erect annual or biennial plant grown extensively especially for hay and soil improvement
  • Melody -  the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notes; a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence
  • Melon -  any of numerous fruits of the gourd family having a hard rind and sweet juicy flesh; any of various fruit of cucurbitaceous vines including: muskmelons; watermelons; cantaloupes; cucumbers
  • Mentha pulegium -  Eurasian perennial mint have small lilac-blue flowers and ovate leaves; yields an aromatic oil
  • Mentha suaveolens -  mint with apple-scented stems of southern and western Europe; naturalized in United States
  • Merlot -  dry red wine made from a grape grown widely in Bordeaux and California; black wine grape originally from the region of Bordeaux
  • Mesembryanthemum crystallinum -  Old World annual widely naturalized in warm regions having white flowers and fleshy foliage covered with hairs that resemble ice
  • Mespilus germanica -  small deciduous Eurasian tree cultivated for its fruit that resemble crab apples
  • Mesquite -  any of several small spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Prosopis having small flowers in axillary cylindrical spikes followed by large pods rich in sugar
  • Metroxylon sagu -  Malaysian palm whose pithy trunk yields sago--a starch used as a food thickener and fabric stiffener; Malaya to Fiji
  • Mildew -  a fungus that produces a superficial (usually white) growth on organic matter; the process of becoming mildewed;  become moldy; spoil due to humidity
  • Mincemeat -  spiced mixture of chopped raisins and apples and other ingredients with or without meat
  • minimum -  the least possible;  the point on a curve where the tangent changes from negative on the left to positive on the right; the smallest possible quantity
  • Mirabilis jalapa -  common garden plant of North America having fragrant red or purple or yellow or white flowers that open in late afternoon
  • Mission -  the organized work of a religious missionary; a special assignment that is given to a person or group; an operation that is assigned by a higher headquarters; an organization of missionaries in a foreign land sent to carry on religious work; a group of representatives or delegates
  • Mississippi -  a state in the Deep South on the gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate States during the American Civil War; a major North American river and the chief river of the United States; rises in northern Minnesota and flows southward into the Gulf of Mexico
  • Monarda citriodora -  an annual horsemint of central and western United States and northern Mexico
  • Monroe -  a town in north central Louisiana; a town of southeast Michigan on Lake Erie; 5th President of the United States; author of the Monroe Doctrine (1758-1831); United States film actress noted for sex appeal (1926-1962)
  • Monstera deliciosa -  tropical American vine having roots that hang like cords and cylindrical fruit with a pineapple and banana flavor
  • Moonshine -  whiskey illegally distilled from a corn mash; the light of the moon;  distill (alcohol) illegally; produce moonshine
  • Morus -  type genus of the Moraceae: mulberries
  • Morus alba -  Asiatic mulberry with white to pale red fruit; leaves used to feed silkworms
  • Morus nigra -  European mulberry having dark foliage and fruit
  • Morus rubra -  North American mulberry having dark purple edible fruit
  • Mosquito net -  a fine net or screen (especially around beds) to protect against mosquitos
  • Mottle -  an irregular arrangement of patches of color;  colour with streaks or blotches of different shades; mark with spots or blotches of different color or shades of color as if stained
  • Mousetrap -  (American football) a play in which a defensive player is allowed to cross the line of scrimmage and then blocked off as the runner goes through the place the lineman vacated; a trap for catching mice
  • Muesli -  mixture of untoasted dry cereals and fruits
  • Mugwort -  any of several weedy composite plants of the genus Artemisia
  • Mung bean -  erect bushy annual widely cultivated in warm regions of India and Indonesia and United States for forage and especially its edible seeds; chief source of bean sprouts used in Chinese cookery; sometimes placed in genus Phaseolus
  • Musa basjoo -  Asiatic banana plant cultivated especially as a foliage plant in Japan
  • Musaceae -  treelike tropical Asian herbs
  • Muscat -  sweet aromatic grape used for raisins and wine; wine from muscat grapes; a port on the Gulf of Oman and capital of the sultanate of Oman; any of several cultivated grapevines that produce sweet white grapes
  • Muscatel -  sweet aromatic grape used for raisins and wine; wine from muscat grapes
  • Muskmelon -  the fruit of a muskmelon vine; any of several sweet melons related to cucumbers; any of several varieties of vine whose fruit has a netted rind and edible flesh and a musky smell
  • Mustard -  leaves eaten as cooked greens; pungent powder or paste prepared from ground mustard seeds; any of several cruciferous plants of the genus Brassica
  • Mustard -  leaves eaten as cooked greens; pungent powder or paste prepared from ground mustard seeds; any of several cruciferous plants of the genus Brassica
  • Mustard oil -  oil obtained from mustard seeds and used in making soap
  • Mustard seed -  black or white seeds ground to make mustard pastes or powders
  • Myroxylon -  a genus of tropical American trees having pinnate leaves and white flowers
  • Napkin -  a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing; garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waist; worn by infants to catch excrement
  • Narcissus -  (Greek mythology) a beautiful young man who fell in love with his own reflection; bulbous plant having erect linear leaves and showy yellow or white flowers either solitary or in clusters
  • Nashville -  capital of the state of Tennessee; located in the north central part of the state on the Cumberland River; known for country music
  • Natchez -  a town in southwest Mississippi on the Mississippi River
  • Natural rubber -  an elastic material obtained from the latex sap of trees (especially trees of the genera Hevea and Ficus) that can be vulcanized and finished into a variety of products
  • Nectarine -  a variety or mutation of the peach that has a smooth skin; variety or mutation of the peach bearing fruit with smooth skin and (usually) yellow flesh
  • Nelson -  English admiral who defeated the French fleets of Napoleon but was mortally wounded at Trafalgar (1758-1805)
  • Nelumbo lutea -  water lily of eastern North America having pale yellow blossoms and edible globular nutlike seeds
  • Nelumbo nucifera -  native to eastern Asia; widely cultivated for its large pink or white flowers
  • Nematode -  unsegmented worms with elongated rounded body pointed at both ends; mostly free-living but some are parasitic
  • Niagara -  a river flowing from Lake Erie into Lake Ontario; forms boundary between Ontario and New York; waterfall in Canada is the Horseshoe Falls; in the United States it is the American Falls
  • Nicotiana -  American and Asiatic aromatic herbs and shrubs with viscid foliage
  • Nicotiana -  American and Asiatic aromatic herbs and shrubs with viscid foliage
  • Nicotiana alata -  South American ornamental perennial having nocturnally fragrant greenish-white flowers
  • Nicotiana glauca -  evergreen South American shrub naturalized in United States; occasionally responsible for poisoning livestock
  • Nicotiana tabacum -  tall erect South American herb with large ovate leaves and terminal clusters of tubular white or pink flowers; cultivated for its leaves
  • Nigella sativa -  herb of the Mediterranean region having pungent seeds used like those of caraway
  • Nitrocellulose -  nitric acid esters; used in lacquers and explosives
  • Nolina microcarpa -  stemless plant with tufts of grasslike leaves and erect panicle of minute creamy white flowers; southwestern United States and Mexico
  • Nonpareil -  eminent beyond or above comparison;  a flat disk of chocolate covered with beads of colored sugar; colored beads of sugar used as a topping on e.g. candies and cookies; model of excellence or perfection of a kind; one having no equal
  • North Carolina -  a state in southeastern United States; one of the original 13 colonies; one of the British colonies that formed the United States
  • Northern Spy -  large late-ripening apple with skin striped with yellow and red
  • Nougat -  nuts or fruit pieces in a sugar paste
  • Nuphar advena -  common water lily of eastern and central North America, having broad leaves and globe-shaped yellow flowers; in sluggish fresh or slightly brackish water
  • Nutcracker -  speckled birds that feed on nuts; a compound lever used to crack nuts open; any of various small short-tailed songbirds with strong feet and a sharp beak that feed on small nuts and insects
  • Nutmeg -  hard aromatic seed of the nutmeg tree used as spice when grated or ground; East Indian tree widely cultivated in the tropics for its aromatic seed; source of two spices: nutmeg and mace
  • occupation -  the act of occupying or taking possession of a building; the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; any activity that occupies a person's attention; the control of a country by military forces of a foreign power; the period of time during which a place or position or nation is occupied
  • Oenothera biennis -  a coarse biennial of eastern North America with yellow flowers that open in the evening; naturalized in Europe
  • Olive branch -  something offered to an adversary in the hope of obtaining peace
  • Onobrychis -  genus of Old World herbs having pinnate leaves and pink or whites racemose flowers followed by flat unjointed pods
  • Onobrychis viciifolia -  Eurasian perennial herb having pale pink flowers and curved pods; naturalized in Britain and North America grasslands on calcareous soils; important forage crop and source of honey in Britain
  • Ontario -  a prosperous and industrialized province in central Canada; the smallest of the Great Lakes
  • Operculum -  a hard flap serving as a cover for (a) the gill slits in fishes or (b) the opening of the shell in certain gastropods when the body is retracted
  • Ophrys -  a hardy genus of terrestrial orchids of Europe and northern Africa and western Asia
  • Opopanax -  an odorous gum resin formerly used in medicines
  • Opuntia -  large genus of cactuses native to America: prickly pears
  • Orange -  of the color between red and yellow; similar to the color of a ripe orange;  orange color or pigment; any of a range of colors between red and yellow; round yellow to orange fruit of any of several citrus trees; a river in South Africa that flows generally westward to the Atlantic Ocean; any citrus tree bearing oranges; any pigment producing the orange color
  • Orchard -  garden consisting of a small cultivated wood without undergrowth
  • Oregano -  aromatic Eurasian perennial; pungent leaves used as seasoning with meats and fowl and in stews and soups and omelets
  • Origanum -  any of various fragrant aromatic herbs of the genus Origanum used as seasonings
  • Orion -  a constellation on the equator east of Taurus; contains Betelgeuse and Rigel; (Greek mythology) a giant Boeotian hunter who pursued the Pleiades and was eventually slain by Artemis; was then placed in the sky as a constellation
  • Oryza sativa -  yields the staple food of 50 percent of world's population
  • Oryzopsis hymenoides -  valuable forage grass of dry upland areas and plains of western North America to northern Mexico
  • Ostryopsis -  deciduous monoecious shrubs of China and Mongolia resembling trees of the genus Ostrya; sometimes placed in subfamily or family Carpinaceae
  • Oxalis tuberosa -  South American wood sorrel cultivated for its edible tubers
  • Oxalis violacea -  perennial herb of eastern North America with palmately compound leaves and usually rose-purple flowers
  • Ozothamnus -  genus of Australian shrubs and perennial herbs; sometimes included in genus Helichrysum
  • Pachyrhizus -  small genus of tropical vines having tuberous roots
  • Pachyrhizus erosus -  Central American twining plant with edible roots and pods; large tubers are eaten raw or cooked especially when young and young pods must be thoroughly cooked; pods and seeds also yield rotenone and oils
  • Paddy field -  an irrigated or flooded field where rice is grown
  • Palm oil -  oil from nuts of oil palms especially the African oil palm
  • Palmer -  United States golfer (born in 1929)
  • Palomino -  a horse of light tan or golden color with cream or white mane and tail
  • Papaver somniferum -  southwestern Asian herb with greyish leaves and white or reddish flowers; source of opium
  • Papaver somniferum -  southwestern Asian herb with greyish leaves and white or reddish flowers; source of opium
  • Papaya -  large oval melon-like tropical fruit with yellowish flesh; tropical American shrub or small tree having huge deeply palmately cleft leaves and large oblong yellow fruit
  • Paper mulberry -  shrubby Asiatic tree having bark (tapa) that resembles cloth; grown as a shade tree in Europe and America; male flowers are pendulous catkins and female are urn-shaped followed by small orange-red aggregate berries
  • Paprika -  a mild powdered seasoning made from dried pimientos; plant bearing large mild thick-walled usually bell-shaped fruits; the principal salad peppers
  • Paprika -  a mild powdered seasoning made from dried pimientos; plant bearing large mild thick-walled usually bell-shaped fruits; the principal salad peppers
  • Parkia javanica -  tall evergreen rain forest tree with wide-spreading crown having yellow-white flowers; grown as an ornamental in parks and large gardens
  • Parkinsonia florida -  densely branched spiny tree of southwestern United States having showy yellow flowers and blue-green bark; sometimes placed in genus Cercidium
  • Parrish -  United States painter (1870-1966)
  • Parsley -  aromatic herb with flat or crinkly leaves that are cut finely and used to garnish food; annual or perennial herb with aromatic leaves
  • Parsnip -  whitish edible root; eaten cooked; a strong-scented plant cultivated for its edible root; the whitish root of cultivated parsnip
  • Parthenium argentatum -  much-branched subshrub with silvery leaves and small white flowers of Texas and northern Mexico; cultivated as a source of rubber
  • Passerina -  a genus of small North American finches including the New World buntings
  • Passion fruit -  egg-shaped tropical fruit of certain passionflower vines; used for sherbets and confectionery and drinks
  • Patchouli -  a heavy perfume made from the patchouli plant; small East Indian shrubby mint; fragrant oil from its leaves is used in perfumes
  • Pattypan squash -  round greenish-white squash having one face flattened with a scalloped edge; squash plant having flattened round fruit with a scalloped edge; usually greenish white
  • Pavonia -  any of various evergreen plants of the genus Pavonia having white or yellow or purple flowers
  • Peach -  downy juicy fruit with sweet yellowish or whitish flesh; cultivated in temperate regions; a shade of pink tinged with yellow; a very attractive or seductive looking woman;  divulge confidential information or secrets; "Be careful--his secretary talks"
  • Peacock -  male peafowl; having a crested head and very large fanlike tail marked with iridescent eyes or spots; European butterfly having reddish-brown wings each marked with a purple eyespot
  • Peanut -  of little importance or influence or power; of minor status;  pod of the peanut vine containing usually 2 nuts or seeds; `groundnut' and `monkey nut' are British terms; a young child who is small for his age; widely cultivated American plant cultivated in tropical and warm regions; showy yellow flowers on stalks that bend over to the soil so that seed pods ripen underground; underground pod of the peanut vine
  • Peanut oil -  a oil from peanuts; used in cooking and making soap
  • peanuts -  an insignificant sum of money; a trifling amount
  • Pear-shaped -  having a round shape tapered at one end; (of sounds) full and rich
  • Pearl millet -  tall grass having cattail like spikes; grown in Africa and Asia for its grain and in the United States chiefly for forage; sometimes used in making beer
  • Pearmain -  any of several varieties of apples with red skins
  • Pecan pie -  pie made of pecans and sugar and corn syrup and butter and eggs
  • Pelargonium -  geraniums native chiefly to South Africa; widely cultivated
  • Pelargonium graveolens -  any of several southern African geraniums having fragrant three-lobed to five-lobed leaves and pink flowers
  • Pepin -  king of the Franks and father of Charlemagne who defended papal interests and founded the Carolingian dynasty in 751 (714-768)
  • pepper -  sweet and hot varieties of fruits of plants of the genus Capsicum; pungent seasoning from the berry of the common pepper plant of East India; use whole or ground; climber having dark red berries (peppercorns) when fully ripe; southern India and Sri Lanka; naturalized in northern Burma and Assam; any of various tropical plants of the genus Capsicum bearing peppers;  attack and bombard with or as if with missiles; add pepper to
  • Peppermint -  a candy flavored with peppermint oil; herb with downy leaves and small purple or white flowers that yields a pungent oil used as a flavoring; red gum tree of Tasmania
  • perfumery -  the art of making perfumes; an establishment where perfumes are made; store where perfumes are sold; perfumes in general
  • Perilla -  small genus of Asiatic herbs
  • Persian melon -  the fruit of a variety of winter melon vine; a large green melon with orange flesh; any of a variety of muskmelon vines having fruit with a smooth white rind and white or greenish flesh that does not have a musky smell
  • Persimmon -  orange fruit resembling a plum; edible when fully ripe; any of several tropical trees of the genus Diospyros
  • Petunia -  any of numerous tropical herbs having fluted funnel-shaped flowers; annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of tropical South America
  • Phalaenopsis -  genus of ornamental epiphytic orchids of Asia and Australia
  • Phalaris -  a genus of grasses with broad leaves and a dense spike of flowers
  • Phalaris aquatica -  perennial grass of Australia and South Africa; introduced in North America as forage grass
  • Phaseolus coccineus -  tropical American bean with red flowers and mottled black beans similar to Phaseolus vulgaris but perennial; a preferred food bean in Great Britain
  • Phaseolus vulgaris -  the common annual twining or bushy bean plant grown for its edible seeds or pods
  • Philadelphus -  any of various chiefly deciduous ornamental shrubs of the genus Philadelphus having white sweet-scented flowers, single or in clusters; widely grown in temperate regions
  • philanthropist -  someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being
  • Phleum pratense -  grass with long cylindrical spikes frown in northern United States and Europe for hay
  • Phoenix -  the state capital and largest city located in south central Arizona; situated in a former desert that has become a prosperous agricultural area thanks to irrigation; a constellation in the southern hemisphere near Tucana and Sculptor; a legendary Arabian bird said to periodically burn itself to death and emerge from the ashes as a new phoenix; according to most versions only one phoenix lived at a time and it renewed itself every 500 years; a large monocotyledonous genus of pinnate-leaved palms found in Asia and Africa
  • Photinia -  genus of deciduous and evergreen east Asian trees and shrubs widely cultivated as ornamentals for their white flowers and red fruits; in some classifications includes genus Heteromeles
  • Phragmites -  reeds of marshes and riversides in tropical or temperate regions
  • Physalis philadelphica -  Mexican annual naturalized in eastern North America having yellow to purple edible fruit resembling small tomatoes
  • Physalis pruinosa -  stout hairy annual of eastern North America with sweet yellow fruits
  • Phytolacca -  type genus of Phytolaccaceae: pokeweed
  • Phytolacca americana -  tall coarse perennial American herb having small white flowers followed by blackish-red berries on long drooping racemes; young fleshy stems are edible; berries and root are poisonous
  • Piccalilli -  relish of chopped pickled cucumbers and green peppers and onion
  • Picea -  a genus of temperate and arctic evergreen trees (see spruce)
  • Pigeon pea -  tropical woody herb with showy yellow flowers and flat pods; much cultivated in the tropics; small highly nutritious seed of the tropical pigeon-pea plant
  • Pimiento -  fully ripened sweet red pepper; usually cooked; plant bearing large mild thick-walled usually bell-shaped fruits; the principal salad peppers
  • Pine nut -  edible seed of any of several nut pines especially some pinons of southwestern North America
  • Pineapple -  large sweet fleshy tropical fruit with a terminal tuft of stiff leaves; widely cultivated; a tropical American plant bearing a large fleshy edible fruit with a terminal tuft of stiff leaves; widely cultivated in the tropics
  • Pink Lady -  a cocktail made of gin and brandy with lemon juice and grenadine shaken with an egg white and ice
  • Pinot -  any of several purple or white wine grapes used especially for burgundies and champagnes
  • Pinto bean -  mottled or spotted bean of southwestern United States; usually dried
  • Pinus -  type genus of the Pinaceae: large genus of true pines
  • Pinus cembra -  large five-needled European pine; yields cembra nuts and a resinous exudate
  • Pinus cembroides -  a small two-needled or three-needled pinon of Mexico and southern Texas
  • Pinus edulis -  small compact two-needled pinon of southwestern United States; important as a nut pine
  • Pinus monophylla -  pinon of southwestern United States having solitary needles and often many stems; important as a nut pine
  • Pinus mugo -  low shrubby pine of central Europe with short bright green needles in bunches of two
  • Pinus quadrifolia -  five-needled pinon of southern California and northern Baja California having (sometimes three-needled or four-needled showing hybridization from Pinus californiarum)
  • Pinus strobiformis -  medium-size pine of northwestern Mexico; bark is dark brown and furrowed when mature
  • Pinus strobus -  tall-growing pine of eastern North America; bark is brown with longitudinal fissures when mature; valued as a timber tree
  • Piper cubeba -  tropical southeast Asian shrubby vine bearing spicy berrylike fruits
  • Pistachio -  nut of Mediterranean trees having an edible green kernel; small tree of southern Europe and Asia Minor bearing small hard-shelled nuts
  • Pistacia -  a dicotyledonous genus of trees of the family Anacardiaceae having drupaceous fruit
  • Pistacia lentiscus -  an evergreen shrub of the Mediterranean region that is cultivated for its resin
  • Pithecellobium dulce -  common thorny tropical American tree having terminal racemes of yellow flowers followed by sickle-shaped or circinate edible pods and yielding good timber and a yellow dye and mucilaginous gum
  • Plantago -  type genus of the family Plantaginaceae; large cosmopolitan genus of mostly small herbs
  • Plantago major -  common European perennial naturalized worldwide; a troublesome weed
  • Platanus -  genus of large monoecious mostly deciduous trees: London plane; sycamore
  • Plectranthus -  any of various ornamental plants of the genus Plectranthus
  • Pleurotus ostreatus -  edible agaric with a soft greyish cap growing in shelving masses on dead wood
  • Plum tomato -  oblong cherry tomato; a kind of cherry tomato that has an oblong shape
  • Polonium -  a radioactive metallic element that is similar to tellurium and bismuth; occurs in uranium ores but can be produced by bombarding bismuth with neutrons in a nuclear reactor
  • Polygala -  type genus of the Polygalaceae: milkwort; senega; snakeroot
  • Polygonatum -  sometimes placed in subfamily Convallariaceae
  • Polygonatum -  sometimes placed in subfamily Convallariaceae
  • Polygonatum biflorum -  North American perennial herb with smooth foliage and drooping tubular greenish flowers
  • Pomegranate -  large globular fruit having many seeds with juicy red pulp in a tough brownish-red rind; shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
  • Pomelo -  large pear-shaped fruit similar to grapefruit but with coarse dry pulp; southeastern Asian tree producing large fruits resembling grapefruits
  • Popcorn -  small kernels of corn exploded by heat; corn having small ears and kernels that burst when exposed to dry heat
  • Poppy seed -  small grey seed of a poppy flower; used whole or ground in baked items
  • Populus -  a genus of trees of the family Salicaceae that is found in the northern hemisphere; poplars
  • Portulaca oleracea -  weedy trailing mat-forming herb with bright yellow flowers cultivated for its edible mildly acid leaves eaten raw or cooked especially in Indian and Greek and Middle Eastern cuisine; cosmopolitan
  • Pot liquor -  the liquid in which vegetables or meat have be cooked
  • Potamogeton -  a large genus of aquatic herbs found in quiet waters in temperate regions; leaves usually float on the water
  • Potato -  an edible tuber native to South America; a staple food of Ireland; annual native to South America having underground stolons bearing edible starchy tubers; widely cultivated as a garden vegetable; vines are poisonous
  • powder -  any of various cosmetic or medical preparations dispensed in the form of a pulverized powder; a solid substance in the form of tiny loose particles; a solid that has been pulverized; a mixture of potassium nitrate, charcoal, and sulfur in a 75:15:10 ratio which is used in gunnery, time fuses, and fireworks;  apply powder to; make into a powder by breaking up or cause to become dust
  • Praline -  cookie-sized candy made of brown sugar and butter and pecans
  • Princess of Wales -  English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)
  • Produce -  fresh fruits and vegetable grown for the market;  create or manufacture a man-made product; bring forth or yield; cause to happen, occur or exist; bring out for display; bring onto the market or release; come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques
  • Prosopis -  genus of tropical or subtropical branching shrubs or trees: mesquite
  • Prosopis glandulosa -  thorny deep-rooted drought-resistant shrub native to southwestern United States and Mexico bearing pods rich in sugar and important as livestock feed; tends to form extensive thickets
  • Prosopis juliflora -  mesquite of Gulf Coast and Caribbean islands from Mexico to Venezuela
  • Prosopis pubescens -  shrub or small tree of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico having spirally twisted pods
  • Prunella vulgaris -  decumbent blue-flowered European perennial thought to possess healing properties; naturalized throughout North America
  • Prunus -  a genus of shrubs and trees of the family Rosaceae that is widely distributed in temperate regions
  • Prunus -  a genus of shrubs and trees of the family Rosaceae that is widely distributed in temperate regions
  • Prunus alleghaniensis -  wild plum of northeastern United States having dark purple fruits with yellow flesh
  • Prunus americana -  wild plum trees of eastern and central North America having red-orange fruit with yellow flesh
  • Prunus angustifolia -  small native American shrubby tree bearing small edible yellow to reddish fruit
  • Prunus avium -  large Eurasian tree producing small dark bitter fruit in the wild but edible sweet fruit under cultivation
  • Prunus cerasifera -  small Asiatic tree bearing edible red or yellow fruit; used in Europe as budding stock
  • Prunus cerasus -  rather small Eurasian tree producing red to black acid edible fruit
  • Prunus domestica -  any of various widely distributed plums grown in the cooler temperate areas
  • Prunus dulcis -  small bushy deciduous tree native to Asia and North Africa having pretty pink blossoms and highly prized edible nuts enclosed in a hard green hull; cultivated in southern Australia and California
  • Prunus glandulosa -  small Chinese shrub with smooth unfurrowed dark red fruit grown especially for its red or pink or white flowers
  • Prunus ilicifolia -  California evergreen wild plum with spiny leathery leaves and white flowers
  • Prunus incisa -  shrubby Japanese cherry tree having pale pink blossoms
  • Prunus japonica -  woody oriental plant with smooth unfurrowed red fruit grown especially for its white or pale pink blossoms
  • Prunus laurocerasus -  frequently cultivated Eurasian evergreen shrub or small tree having showy clusters of white flowers and glossy foliage and yielding oil similar to bitter almond oil
  • Prunus mexicana -  small tree of southwestern United States having purplish-red fruit sometimes cultivated as an ornamental for its large leaves
  • Prunus mume -  Japanese ornamental tree with fragrant white or pink blossoms and small yellow fruits
  • Prunus nigra -  small tree native to northeastern North America having oblong orange-red fruit
  • Prunus padus -  small European cherry tree closely resembling the American chokecherry
  • Prunus pensylvanica -  small shrubby North American wild cherry with small bright red acid fruit
  • Prunus pumila -  small straggling American cherry growing on sandy soil and having minute scarcely edible purplish-black fruit
  • Prunus salicina -  small tree of China and Japan bearing large yellow to red plums usually somewhat inferior to European plums in flavor
  • Prunus serotina -  large North American wild cherry with round black sour edible fruit
  • Prunus serrulata -  ornamental tree with inedible fruits widely cultivated in many varieties for its white blossoms
  • Prunus subcordata -  shrub of the Pacific coast of the United States bearing small red insipid fruit
  • Prunus subhirtella -  shrub or tree native to Japan cultivated as an ornamental for its rose-pink flowers
  • Prunus triloba -  deciduous Chinese shrub or small tree with often trilobed leaves grown for its pink-white flowers
  • Prunus virginiana -  a common wild cherry of eastern North America having small bitter black berries favored by birds
  • Psoralea esculenta -  densely hairy perennial of central North America having edible tuberous roots
  • Psyllium -  plantain of Mediterranean regions whose seeds swell and become gelatinous when moist and are used as a mild laxative
  • pudding -  any of various soft sweet desserts thickened usually with flour and baked or boiled or steamed; (British) the dessert course of a meal (`pud' is used informally); any of various soft thick unsweetened baked dishes
  • Pulasan -  fruit of an East Indian tree similar to the rambutan but sweeter; East Indian fruit tree bearing fruit similar to but sweeter than that of the rambutan
  • Pumpkin -  usually large pulpy deep-yellow round fruit of the squash family maturing in late summer or early autumn; a coarse vine widely cultivated for its large pulpy round orange fruit with firm orange skin and numerous seeds; subspecies of Cucurbita pepo include the summer squashes and a few autumn squashes
  • Punica -  coextensive with the family Punicaceae
  • Punica granatum -  shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
  • Punnet -  a small light basket used as a measure for fruits
  • Purple Emperor -  large European butterfly the male of which has wings shaded with purple
  • Pyrus -  fruit trees native to the Old World: pears
  • Pyrus communis -  Old World tree having sweet gritty-textured juicy fruit; widely cultivated in many varieties
  • Quarantine -  isolation to prevent the spread of infectious disease; enforced isolation of patients suffering from a contagious disease in order to prevent the spread of disease;  place into enforced isolation, as for medical reasons
  • Queens -  a borough of New York City
  • Quercus agrifolia -  highly variable often shrubby evergreen oak of coastal zone of western North America having small thick usually spiny-toothed dark-green leaves
  • Quercus michauxii -  medium to large deciduous tree of moist areas of southeastern United States similar to the basket oak
  • Quince -  aromatic acid-tasting pear-shaped fruit used in preserves; small Asian tree with pinkish flowers and pear-shaped fruit; widely cultivated
  • Radicchio -  prized variety of chicory having globose heads of red leaves
  • Radish -  pungent fleshy edible root; Eurasian plant widely cultivated for its edible pungent root usually eaten raw; pungent edible root of any of various cultivated radish plants; radish of Japan with a long hard durable root eaten raw or cooked; a cruciferous plant of the genus Raphanus having a pungent edible root
  • Rambutan -  pleasantly acid bright red oval Malayan fruit covered with soft spines; Malayan tree bearing spiny red fruit
  • Rangpur -  hybrid between mandarin orange and lemon having very acid fruit with orange peel
  • Ranunculus acris -  perennial European buttercup with yellow spring flowers widely naturalized especially in eastern North America
  • Rapeseed -  seed of rape plants; source of an edible oil
  • Rapeseed oil -  edible light yellow to brown oil from rapeseed used also as a lubricant or illuminant
  • Raspberry -  red or black edible aggregate berries usually smaller than the related blackberries; woody brambles bearing usually red but sometimes black or yellow fruits that separate from the receptacle when ripe and are rounder and smaller than blackberries; a cry or noise made to express displeasure or contempt
  • Rattan -  a switch made from the stems of the rattan palms; the stem of various climbing palms of the genus Calamus and related genera used to make wickerwork and furniture and canes; climbing palm of Sri Lanka and southern India remarkable for the great length of the stems which are used for malacca canes
  • Red cabbage -  compact head of purplish-red leaves; cabbage plant with a compact head of reddish purple leaves
  • Red Delicious -  a sweet eating apple with bright red skin; most widely grown apple worldwide
  • Red onion -  flat mild onion having purplish tunics; used as garnish on hamburgers and salads
  • Reddish -  of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies
  • Regent -  someone who rules during the absence or incapacity or minority of the country's monarch; members of a governing board
  • Relish -  the taste experience when a savoury condiment is taken into the mouth; spicy or savory condiment; vigorous and enthusiastic enjoyment;  derive or receive pleasure from; get enjoyment from; take pleasure in
  • Reorganisation -  the imposition of a new organization; organizing differently (often involving extensive and drastic changes)
  • Republic -  a form of government whose head of state is not a monarch; a political system in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who can elect people to represent them
  • Rhizophora -  type genus of the Rhizophoraceae; a small genus of tropical trees and shrubs
  • Rhubarb -  plants having long green or reddish acidic leafstalks growing in basal clumps; stems (and only the stems) are edible when cooked; leaves are poisonous; long pinkish sour leafstalks usually eaten cooked and sweetened
  • Rhus trilobata -  deciduous shrub of California with unpleasantly scented usually trifoliate leaves and edible fruit
  • Ribes -  a flowering shrub bearing currants or gooseberries; native to northern hemisphere
  • Ricinus -  a genus of herb having only one known species: castor-oil plant
  • Roach -  European freshwater food fish having a greenish back; the butt of a marijuana cigarette; a roll of hair brushed back from the forehead; any of numerous chiefly nocturnal insects; some are domestic pests; street names for flunitrazepan;  cut the mane off (a horse); comb (hair) into a roach
  • Robusta coffee -  native to West Africa but grown in Java and elsewhere; resistant to coffee rust
  • Romaine lettuce -  lettuce with long dark-green leaves in a loosely packed elongated head; lettuce with long dark-green spoon-shaped leaves
  • Rondo -  a musical form that is often the last movement of a sonata
  • Rooibos -  South African shrub having flat acuminate leaves and yellow flowers; leaves are aromatic when dried and used to make an herbal tea
  • Root rot -  disease characterized by root decay; caused by various fungi
  • rosacea -  a skin disease of adults (more often women) in which blood vessels of the face enlarge resulting in a flushed appearance
  • Roselle -  East Indian sparsely prickly annual herb or perennial subshrub widely cultivated for its fleshy calyxes used in tarts and jelly and for its bast fiber
  • Rosemary -  extremely pungent leaves used fresh or dried as seasoning for especially meats; widely cultivated for its fragrant grey-green leaves used in cooking and in perfumery
  • Royalty -  royal persons collectively; payment to the holder of a patent or copyright or resource for the right to use their property
  • Rubus spectabilis -  large erect red-flowered raspberry of western North America having large pinkish-orange berries
  • Rudbeckia laciniata -  tall leafy plant with erect branches ending in large yellow flower heads with downward-arching rays; grow in Rocky Mountains south to Arizona and east to the Atlantic coast
  • Rumex acetosella -  small plant having pleasantly acid-tasting arrow-shaped leaves; common in dry places
  • Rumex scutatus -  low perennial with small silvery-green ovate to hastate leaves
  • Ruta graveolens -  European strong-scented perennial herb with grey-green bitter-tasting leaves; an irritant similar to poison ivy
  • Rutabaga -  the large yellow root of a rutabaga plant used as food; a cruciferous plant with a thick bulbous edible yellow root
  • Saccharum officinarum -  tall tropical southeast Asian grass having stout fibrous jointed stalks; sap is a chief source of sugar
  • Safflower -  thistlelike Eurasian plant widely grown for its red or orange flower heads and seeds that yield a valuable oil
  • Safflower oil -  oil from seeds of the safflower plant; oil from safflower seeds used as food as well as in medicines and paints
  • Saffron -  dried pungent stigmas of the Old World saffron crocus; Old World crocus having purple or white flowers with aromatic pungent orange stigmas used in flavoring food; a shade of yellow tinged with orange
  • Sagittaria -  genus of aquatic herbs of temperate and tropical regions having sagittate or hastate leaves and white scapose flowers
  • Saguaro -  extremely large treelike cactus of desert regions of southwestern United States having a thick columnar sparsely branched trunk bearing white flowers and edible red pulpy fruit
  • Saigon -  a city in South Vietnam; formerly (as Saigon) it was the capital of French Indochina
  • Saigon cinnamon -  tropical southeast Asian tree with aromatic bark; yields a bark used medicinally
  • Salix babylonica -  willow with long drooping branches and slender leaves native to China; widely cultivated as an ornamental
  • Salix triandra -  Old World willow with light green leaves cultivated for use in basketry
  • Salsa -  spicy sauce of tomatoes and onions and chili peppers to accompany Mexican foods
  • Salsola soda -  bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to produce a crude soda ash
  • Salvadora persica -  glabrous or pubescent evergreen shrub or tree of the genus Salvadora; twigs are fibrous and in some parts of the world are bound together in clusters and used as a toothbrush; shoots are used as camel fodder; plant ash provides salt
  • Salvia -  any of various plants of the genus Salvia; a cosmopolitan herb
  • Salvia -  any of various plants of the genus Salvia; a cosmopolitan herb
  • Salvia officinalis -  shrubby plant with aromatic greyish-green leaves used as a cooking herb
  • Salvia sclarea -  aromatic herb of southern Europe; cultivated in England as a potherb and widely as an ornamental
  • Salvia enaca -  Eurasian sage with blue flowers and foliage like ena; naturalized in United States
  • Samba -  a form of canasta using three decks of cards and six jokers; a lively ballroom dance from Brazil; music composed for dancing the samba; large west African tree having large palmately lobed leaves and axillary cymose panicles of small white flowers and one-winged seeds; yields soft white to pale yellow wood;  dance the samba
  • Sambucus canadensis -  common elder of central and eastern North America bearing purple-black berries; fruit used in wines and jellies
  • Sambucus nigra -  a common shrub with black fruit or a small tree of Europe and Asia; fruit used for wines and jellies
  • Samphire -  fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and small spikes of minute flowers; formerly used in making glass
  • Sandalwood -  close-grained fragrant yellowish heartwood of the true sandalwood; has insect repelling properties and is used for carving and cabinetwork
  • Sandarac -  large coniferous evergreen tree of North Africa and Spain having flattened branches and scalelike leaves yielding a hard fragrant wood; bark yields a resin used in varnishes; a brittle and faintly aromatic translucent resin used in varnishes; durable fragrant wood; used in building (as in the roof of the cathedral at Cordova, Spain)
  • Sansevieria -  grown as a houseplant for its mottled fleshy sword-shaped leaves or as a source of fiber
  • Sapote -  brown oval fruit flesh makes excellent sherbet; tropical American tree having wood like mahogany and sweet edible egg-shaped fruit; in some classifications placed in the genus Calocarpum
  • Sauerkraut -  shredded cabbage fermented in brine
  • Saussurea costus -  annual herb of the eastern Himalayas (Kashmir) having purple florets and a fragrant root that yields a volatile oil used in perfumery and for preserving furs
  • Savoy cabbage -  head of soft crinkly leaves; cabbage plant with a compact head of crinkled leaves
  • Saxifraga -  type genus of the Saxifragaceae; large genus of usually perennial herbs of arctic and cool regions of northern hemisphere: saxifrage
  • Saxifraga oppositifolia -  plants forming dense cushions with bright reddish-lavender flowers; rocky areas of Europe and Asia and western North America
  • Scallion -  young onion before the bulb has enlarged; plant having a large slender white bulb and flat overlapping dark green leaves; used in cooking; believed derived from the wild Allium ampeloprasum
  • Scarecrow -  an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seeds
  • Schinus molle -  small Peruvian evergreen with broad rounded head and slender pendant branches with attractive clusters of greenish flowers followed by clusters of rose-pink fruits
  • scientist -  a person with advanced knowledge of one or more sciences
  • Scorzonera hispanica -  perennial south European herb having narrow entire leaves and solitary yellow flower heads and long black edible roots shaped like carrots
  • Scuppernong -  amber-green muscadine grape of southeastern United States
  • Scutellaria lateriflora -  an American mint that yields a resinous exudate used especially formerly as an antispasmodic
  • Sea Island Cotton -  small bushy tree grown on islands of the Caribbean and off the Atlantic coast of the southern United States; yields cotton with unusually long silky fibers
  • Sea lettuce -  seaweed with edible translucent crinkly green fronds
  • Seasoning -  the act of adding a seasoning to food; something added to food primarily for the savor it imparts
  • seaweed -  plant growing in the sea, especially marine algae
  • Senna obtusifolia -  cosmopolitan tropical herb or subshrub with yellow flowers and slender curved pods; a weed; sometimes placed in genus Cassia
  • Sensation -  an unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation; a general feeling of excitement and heightened interest; a state of widespread public excitement and interest; the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field
  • Sesame -  East Indian annual erect herb; source of sesame seed or benniseed and sesame oil
  • Sesbania grandiflora -  a softwood tree with lax racemes of usually red or pink flowers; tropical Australia and Asia; naturalized in southern Florida and West Indies
  • Setaria italica -  coarse drought-resistant annual grass grown for grain, hay and forage in Europe and Asia and chiefly for forage and hay in United States
  • Shallot -  small mild-flavored onion-like or garlic-like clustered bulbs used for seasoning; type of onion plant producing small clustered mild-flavored bulbs used as seasoning; aggregated bulb of the multiplier onion
  • Shiitake -  edible east Asian mushroom having a golden or dark brown to blackish cap and an inedible stipe
  • Shooting -  the act of firing a projectile; killing someone by gunfire
  • Silage -  fodder harvested while green and kept succulent by partial fermentation as in a silo
  • Silphium -  tall North American perennial herbs
  • Silybum marianum -  tall Old World biennial thistle with large clasping white-blotched leaves and purple flower heads; naturalized in California and South America
  • Sisymbrium officinale -  stiffly branching Old World annual with pale yellow flowers; widely naturalized in North America; formerly used medicinally
  • Sium sisarum -  an Asiatic herb cultivated in Europe for its sweet edible tuberous root
  • Smash -  with a loud crash;  a serious collision (especially of motor vehicles); a conspicuous success; the act of colliding with something; a hard return hitting the tennis ball above your head; a vigorous blow;  break suddenly into pieces, as from a violent blow; break into pieces, as by striking or knocking over; overthrow or destroy (something considered evil or harmful); hit hard; collide or strike violently and suddenly; hit (a tennis ball) in a powerful overhead stroke; hit violently; damage or destroy as if by violence; humiliate or depress completely; reduce to bankruptcy
  • Smilax -  fragile twining plant of South Africa with bright green flattened stems and glossy foliage popular as a floral decoration; sometimes placed in Smilacaceae
  • smoking -  emitting smoke in great volume;  the act of smoking tobacco or other substances; a hot vapor containing fine particles of carbon being produced by combustion
  • Smyrnium olusatrum -  European herb somewhat resembling celery widely naturalized in Britain coastal regions and often cultivated as a potherb
  • Snap pea -  variety of pea plant producing peas having crisp rounded edible pods
  • Snow pea -  green peas with flat edible pods; variety of pea plant producing peas having thin flat edible pods
  • Snuff -  snuff colored; of a greyish to yellowish brown;  finely powdered tobacco for sniffing up the nose; a pinch of smokeless tobacco inhaled at a single time; the charred portion of a candlewick; sensing an odor by inhaling through the nose;  inhale audibly through the nose; sniff or smell inquiringly
  • Soil conditioner -  a chemical substance used to improve the structure of the soil and increase its porosity
  • Solanum aviculare -  Australian annual sometimes cultivated for its racemes of purple flowers and edible yellow egg-shaped fruit
  • Solanum pseudocapsicum -  small South American shrub cultivated as a houseplant for its abundant ornamental but poisonous red or yellow cherry-sized fruit
  • Solanum quitoense -  small perennial shrub cultivated in uplands of South America for its edible bright orange fruits resembling tomatoes or oranges
  • Sonchus oleraceus -  annual Eurasian sow thistle with soft spiny leaves and rayed yellow flower heads
  • Sorbus -  a genus of shrubs or trees of the family Rosaceae having feathery leaves
  • Sorbus domestica -  medium-sized European tree resembling the rowan but bearing edible fruit
  • Sorghum -  made from juice of sweet sorghum; economically important Old World tropical cereal grass; annual or perennial tropical and subtropical cereal grasses: sorghum
  • Sorghum -  made from juice of sweet sorghum; economically important Old World tropical cereal grass; annual or perennial tropical and subtropical cereal grasses: sorghum
  • Sorghum bicolor -  important for human and animal food; growth habit and stem form similar to Indian corn but having sawtooth-edged leaves
  • Sorrel -  of a light brownish color;  a horse of a brownish orange to light brown color; large sour-tasting arrowhead-shaped leaves used in salads and sauces; East Indian sparsely prickly annual herb or perennial subshrub widely cultivated for its fleshy calyxes used in tarts and jelly and for its bast fiber; any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicine; any plant or flower of the genus Oxalis
  • Soursop -  large spiny tropical fruit with tart pulp related to custard apples; small tropical American tree bearing large succulent slightly acid fruit
  • South Carolina -  a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies; one of the British colonies that formed the United States
  • Soy sauce -  thin sauce made of fermented soy beans
  • Soybean -  most highly proteinaceous vegetable crop known; erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia; a source of oil; used for forage and soil improvement and as food
  • Spartan -  resolute in the face of pain or danger or adversity; of or relating to or characteristic of Sparta or its people; practicing great self-denial; unsparing and uncompromising in discipline or judgment;  a resident of Sparta
  • Spearmint -  common garden herb having clusters of small purplish flowers and yielding an oil used as a flavoring
  • Spikenard -  an aromatic ointment used in antiquity
  • Spinach -  dark green leaves; eaten cooked or raw in salads; southwestern Asian plant widely cultivated for its succulent edible dark green leaves
  • spinning frame -  spinning machine that draws, twists, and winds yarn
  • Spiraea -  a dicotyledonous genus of the family Rosaceae; any rosaceous plant of the genus Spiraea; has sprays of small white or pink flowers; a Japanese shrub that resembles members of the genus Spiraea; widely cultivated in many varieties for its dense panicles of flowers in many colors; often forced by florists for Easter blooming
  • Spittoon -  a receptacle for spit (usually in a public place)
  • Splendour -  the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand; a quality that outshines the usual
  • Spondias -  tropical trees having one-seeded fruit
  • Spondias purpurea -  common tropical American shrub or small tree with purplish fruit
  • Sprouting -  the process whereby seeds or spores sprout and begin to grow
  • Stacte -  (Old Testament) one of several sweet-smelling spices used in incense
  • Stanleya pinnata -  perennial of southwestern United States having leathery blue-green pinnatifid leaves and thick plumelike spikes of yellow flowers; sometimes placed in genus Cleome
  • Stayman -  apple grown chiefly in the Shenandoah Valley
  • Stellaria media -  a common low-growing annual garden weed with small white flowers; cosmopolitan; so-called because it is eaten by chickens
  • Stevia -  any plant of the genus Piqueria or the closely related genus Stevia; any plant of the genus Stevia or the closely related genus Piqueria having glutinous foliage and white or purplish flowers; Central and South America
  • Stevia -  any plant of the genus Piqueria or the closely related genus Stevia; any plant of the genus Stevia or the closely related genus Piqueria having glutinous foliage and white or purplish flowers; Central and South America
  • stone fruit -  fleshy indehiscent fruit with a single seed: e.g. almond; peach; plum; cherry; elderberry; olive; jujube
  • Stone pine -  medium-sized two-needled pine of southern Europe having a spreading crown; widely cultivated for its sweet seeds that resemble almonds
  • Stover -  the dried stalks and leaves of a field crop (especially corn) used as animal fodder after the grain has been harvested
  • Strawberry -  a soft red birthmark; sweet fleshy red fruit; any of various low perennial herbs with many runners and bearing white flowers followed by edible fruits having many small achenes scattered on the surface of an enlarged red pulpy berry
  • Strawberry -  a soft red birthmark; sweet fleshy red fruit; any of various low perennial herbs with many runners and bearing white flowers followed by edible fruits having many small achenes scattered on the surface of an enlarged red pulpy berry
  • Stunt -  a difficult or unusual or dangerous feat; usually done to gain attention; a creature (especially a whale) that has been prevented from attaining full growth;  perform a stunt or stunts; check the growth or development of
  • Sugar apple -  sweet pulpy tropical fruit with thick scaly rind and shiny black seeds
  • Sugar beet -  white-rooted beet grown as a source of sugar; form of the common beet having a sweet white root from which sugar is obtained
  • Sugarcane -  tall tropical southeast Asian grass having stout fibrous jointed stalks; sap is a chief source of sugar; juicy canes whose sap is a source of molasses and commercial sugar; fresh canes are sometimes chewed for the juice
  • Sultana -  pale yellow seedless grape used for raisins and wine; dried seedless grape
  • Summer savory -  herb with delicately flavored leaves with many uses; erect annual herb with oval leaves and pink flowers; used to flavor e.g. meats or soups or salads; southeastern Europe and naturalized elsewhere
  • sunflower -  any plant of the genus Helianthus having large flower heads with dark disk florets and showy yellow rays
  • Sunflower seed -  edible seed of sunflowers; used as food and poultry feed and as a source of oil
  • Sunset -  providing for termination; of a declining industry or technology;  the daily event of the sun sinking below the horizon; atmospheric phenomena accompanying the daily disappearance of the sun; the time in the evening at which the sun begins to fall below the horizon
  • Suntan -  a browning of the skin resulting from exposure to the rays of the sun;  get a tan from being exposed to the sun
  • Superstar -  someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field
  • Surprise -  the act of surprising someone; a sudden unexpected event; the astonishment you feel when something totally unexpected happens to you;  cause to be surprised; come upon or take unawares; attack by storm; attack suddenly
  • Sweet almond oil -  pale yellow fatty oil expressed from sweet or bitter almonds
  • Sweet corn -  corn that can be eaten as a vegetable while still young and soft; a corn plant developed in order to have young ears that are sweet and suitable for eating
  • Sweet pea -  climbing garden plant having fragrant pastel-colored flowers
  • Sweet potato -  the edible tuberous root of the sweet potato vine which is grown widely in warm regions of the United States; pantropical vine widely cultivated in several varieties for its large sweet tuberous root with orange flesh; egg-shaped terra cotta wind instrument with a mouthpiece and finger holes
  • Sweetie -  a person loved by another person
  • symbolism -  the practice of investing things with symbolic meaning; a system of symbols and symbolic representations; an artistic movement in the late 19th century that tried to express abstract or mystical ideas through the symbolic use of images
  • Symphoricarpos -  deciduous shrubs of North America and Central America and China
  • Syringa -  genus of Old World shrubs or low trees having fragrant flowers in showy panicles: lilacs; large hardy shrub with showy and strongly fragrant creamy-white flowers in short terminal racemes
  • Tabasco pepper -  plant bearing very hot medium-sized oblong red peppers; grown principally in the Gulf Coast states for production of hot sauce
  • Tabbouleh -  a finely chopped salad with tomatoes and parsley and mint and scallions and bulgur wheat
  • Tablecloth -  a covering spread over a dining table
  • Tacca leontopetaloides -  perennial herb of East Indies to Polynesia and Australia; cultivated for its large edible root yielding Otaheite arrowroot starch
  • Tagetes erecta -  a stout branching annual with large yellow to orange flower heads; Mexico and Central America
  • Tagetes patula -  strong-scented bushy annual with orange or yellow flower heads marked with red; Mexico and Guatemala
  • Tall oil -  an oil derived from wood pulp and used in making soaps or lubricants
  • Tamarillo -  South American arborescent shrub having pale pink blossoms followed by egg-shaped reddish-brown edible fruit somewhat resembling a tomato in flavor
  • Tamarind -  large tropical seed pod with very tangy pulp that is eaten fresh or cooked with rice and fish or preserved for curries and chutneys; long-lived tropical evergreen tree with a spreading crown and feathery evergreen foliage and fragrant flowers yielding hard yellowish wood and long pods with edible chocolate-colored acidic pulp
  • Tanacetum parthenium -  bushy aromatic European perennial herb having clusters of buttonlike white-rayed flower heads; valued traditionally for medicinal uses; sometimes placed in genus Chrysanthemum
  • Tangelo -  large sweet juicy hybrid between tangerine and grapefruit having a thick wrinkled skin; hybrid between grapefruit and mandarin orange; cultivated especially in Florida
  • Tangerine -  of a strong reddish orange color;  a reddish to vivid orange color; any of various deep orange mandarins grown in the United States and southern Africa; a variety of mandarin orange
  • Tangor -  large citrus tree having large sweet deep orange fruit that is easily peeled; widely cultivated in Florida
  • Tapioca -  granular preparation of cassava starch used to thicken especially puddings
  • Taraxacum -  an asterid dicot genus of the family Compositae including dandelions
  • Taraxacum officinale -  Eurasian plant widely naturalized as a weed in North America; used as salad greens and to make wine
  • Tarragon -  fresh leaves (or leaves preserved in vinegar) used as seasoning; aromatic perennial of southeastern Russia
  • Tea bag -  small paper bag holding a measure of tea; a measured amount of tea in a bag for an individual serving of tea
  • Tea chest -  chest for storing or transporting tea
  • Tempering -  moderating by making more temperate;  hardening something by heat treatment
  • Tennessee -  a state in east central United States; a river formed by the confluence of two other rivers near Knoxville; it follows a U-shaped course to become a tributary of the Ohio River in western Kentucky
  • Teucrium scorodonia -  European germander with one-sided racemes of yellow flowers; naturalized in North America
  • Thurible -  a container for burning incense (especially one that is swung on a chain in a religious ritual)
  • Thymus serpyllum -  aromatic dwarf shrub common on banks and hillsides in Europe; naturalized in United States
  • Thymus vulgaris -  common aromatic garden perennial native to the western Mediterranean; used in seasonings and formerly as medicine
  • Tilia -  deciduous trees with smooth usually silver-grey bark of North America and Europe and Asia: lime trees; lindens; basswood
  • Tillandsia -  large genus of epiphytic or terrestrial sparse-rooting tropical plants usually forming dense clumps or pendant masses
  • Timothy -  a grass grown for hay; a disciple of Saint Paul who became the leader of the Christian community at Ephesus; grass with long cylindrical spikes frown in northern United States and Europe for hay
  • Tobacco -  leaves of the tobacco plant dried and prepared for smoking or ingestion; aromatic annual or perennial herbs and shrubs
  • Tobacco mosaic virus -  the widely studied plant virus that causes tobacco mosaic; it was the first virus discovered (1892)
  • tobacconist -  a retail dealer in tobacco and tobacco-related articles; a shop that sells pipes and pipe tobacco and cigars and cigarettes
  • Toddy palm -  tall fan palm of Africa and India and Malaysia yielding a hard wood and sweet sap that is a source of palm wine and sugar; leaves used for thatching and weaving
  • Tomatillo -  small edible yellow to purple tomato-like fruit enclosed in a bladderlike husk; annual of Mexico and southern United States having edible purplish viscid fruit resembling small tomatoes; Mexican annual naturalized in eastern North America having yellow to purple edible fruit resembling small tomatoes
  • tomato -  mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetable; native to South America; widely cultivated in many varieties
  • Topaz -  a mineral (fluosilicate of aluminum) that occurs in crystals of various colors and is used as a gemstone; a yellow quartz; a light brown the color of topaz
  • Torrey pine -  medium-sized five-needled pine of southwestern California having long cylindrical cones
  • Torreya californica -  California evergreen having a fruit resembling a nutmeg but with a strong turpentine flavor
  • Tragopogon -  genus of Old World herbs with linear entire leaves and yellow or purple flower heads
  • Tragopogon dubius -  European perennial naturalized throughout United States having hollow stems with a few long narrow tapered leaves and each bearing a solitary pale yellow flower
  • Tragopogon porrifolius -  Mediterranean biennial herb with long-stemmed heads of purple ray flowers and milky sap and long edible root; naturalized throughout United States
  • Tree onion -  type of perennial onion grown chiefly as a curiosity or for early salad onions; having bulbils that replace the flowers
  • Tremella fuciformis -  popular in China and Japan and Taiwan; gelatinous mushrooms; most are dried
  • Trifoliate orange -  small fast-growing spiny deciduous Chinese orange tree bearing sweetly scented flowers and decorative but inedible fruit: used as a stock in grafting and for hedges
  • Trifolium incarnatum -  southern European annual with spiky heads of crimson flower; extensively cultivated in United States for forage
  • Trifolium pratense -  erect to decumbent short-lived perennial having red-purple to pink flowers; the most commonly grown forage clover
  • Trifolium repens -  creeping European clover having white to pink flowers and bright green leaves; naturalized in United States; widely grown for forage
  • Triumph -  the exultation of victory; a successful ending of a struggle or contest;  to express great joy; dwell on with satisfaction; prove superior; be ecstatic with joy
  • Trollius -  perennial herbs of north temperate regions: globeflowers
  • Tropaeolum majus -  strong-growing annual climber having large flowers of all shades of orange from orange-red to yellowish orange and seeds that are pickled and used like capers
  • Trophobiosis -  a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
  • Truffle -  creamy chocolate candy; edible subterranean fungus of the genus Tuber; any of various highly prized edible subterranean fungi of the genus Tuber; grow naturally in southwestern Europe
  • Tuber -  type genus of the Tuberaceae: fungi whose fruiting bodies are typically truffles; a fleshy underground stem or root serving for reproductive and food storage
  • Tuberaceae -  family of fungi whose ascocarps resemble tubers and vary in size from that of an acorn to that of a large apple
  • Tung oil -  a yellow oil obtained from the seeds of the tung tree
  • Turmeric -  ground dried rhizome of the turmeric plant used as seasoning; widely cultivated tropical plant of India having yellow flowers and a large aromatic deep yellow rhizome; source of a condiment and a yellow dye
  • Turnip -  root of any of several members of the mustard family; widely cultivated plant having a large fleshy edible white or yellow root
  • Tutti-frutti -  ice cream containing chopped candied fruits
  • Typha -  reed maces; cattails
  • Typha latifolia -  tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa
  • Ulex europaeus -  very spiny and dense evergreen shrub with fragrant golden-yellow flowers; common throughout western Europe
  • Ulmus -  type genus of family Ulmaceae; deciduous trees having simple serrate leaves; widely distributed in temperate regions
  • Ulmus Alata -  North American elm having twigs and young branches with prominent corky projections
  • Ulmus Rubra -  North American elm having rough leaves that are red when opening; yields a hard wood
  • United Kingdom -  a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland
  • United States -  North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776; the executive and legislative and judicial branches of the federal government of the United States
  • Urtica -  a nettle yielding fiber resembling flax
  • Urtica dioica -  perennial Eurasian nettle established in North America having broad coarsely toothed leaves with copious stinging hairs
  • Uruguay -  a South American republic on the southeast coast of South America; achieved independence from Brazil in 1825
  • Vaccinium angustifolium -  low-growing deciduous shrub of northeastern North America having flowers in compact racemes and bearing sweet dark blue berries
  • Vaccinium corymbosum -  high-growing deciduous shrub of eastern North America bearing edible blueish to blackish berries with a distinct bloom; source of most cultivated blueberries
  • Vaccinium myrsinites -  shrub of the eastern United States having shining evergreen leaves and bluish-black fruit
  • Vaccinium ovatum -  stiff bushy evergreen shrub of western North America having sour black berries and glossy green foliage used in floral arrangements
  • Vaccinium pallidum -  low deciduous shrub of the eastern United States bearing dark blue sweet berries
  • Valencia orange -  variety of sweet orange cultivated extensively in Florida and California
  • Vanguard -  the position of greatest importance or advancement; the leading position in any movement or field; the leading units moving at the head of an army; any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts)
  • Vanilla -  plain and without any extras or adornments; flavored with vanilla extract;  a distinctive fragrant flavor characteristic of vanilla beans; a flavoring prepared from vanilla beans macerated in alcohol (or imitating vanilla beans); any of numerous climbing plants of the genus Vanilla having fleshy leaves and clusters of large waxy highly fragrant white or green or topaz flowers
  • Vanilla planifolia -  a climbing orchid bearing a podlike fruit yielding vanilla beans; widely cultivated from Florida southward throughout tropical America
  • vegetable -  of the nature of or characteristic of or derived from plants;  edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant; any of various herbaceous plants cultivated for an edible part such as the fruit or the root of the beet or the leaf of spinach or the seeds of bean plants or the flower buds of broccoli or cauliflower
  • Vegetable oil -  any of a group of liquid edible fats that are obtained from plants
  • Verdicchio -  a dry white Italian wine made from Verdicchio grapes; a variety of white wine grape grown in Italy
  • Veronica americana -  plant of western North America and northeastern Asia having prostrate stems with dense racemes of pale violet to lilac flowers
  • Viburnum -  deciduous or evergreen shrubs or small trees: arrow-wood; wayfaring tree
  • Viburnum prunifolium -  upright deciduous shrub having frosted dark-blue fruit; east and east central North America
  • Viburnum trilobum -  deciduous North American shrub or small tree having three-lobed leaves and red berries
  • Vichyssoise -  a creamy potato soup flavored with leeks and onions; usually served cold
  • Vicia cracca -  common perennial climber of temperate regions of Eurasia and North America having dense elongate clusters of flowers
  • Vicia faba -  Old World upright plant grown especially for its large flat edible seeds but also as fodder
  • Vicia sativa -  herbaceous climbing plant valuable as fodder and for soil-building
  • Vicia villosa -  European vetch much cultivated as forage and cover crops
  • Vigilante -  member of a vigilance committee
  • Vigna aconitifolia -  East Indian legume having hairy foliage and small yellow flowers followed by cylindrical pods; used especially in India for food and forage and as a soil conditioner; sometimes placed in genus Phaseolus
  • Viola -  a bowed stringed instrument slightly larger than a violin, tuned a fifth lower; large genus of flowering herbs of temperate regions; any of the numerous plants of the genus Viola
  • Virgin Islands -  a group of islands in northeastern West Indies (east of Puerto Rico) discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493; owned by United States and Britain
  • Vitis -  the type genus of the family Vitaceae; woody vines with simple leaves and small flowers; includes a wide variety of grapes
  • Vitis labrusca -  native grape of northeastern United States; origin of many cultivated varieties e.g. Concord grapes
  • Vitis rotundifolia -  native grape of southeastern United States; origin of many cultivated varieties
  • Vitis vinifera -  common European grape cultivated in many varieties; chief source of Old World wine and table grapes
  • Volunteer -  without payment;  a person who performs voluntary work; (military) a person who freely enlists for service; a native or resident of Tennessee;  tell voluntarily; do volunteer work; agree freely
  • Volvariella volvacea -  small tropical and subtropical edible mushroom having a white cap and long stem; an expensive delicacy in China and other Asian countries where it is grown commercially
  • Waldorf salad -  typically made of apples and celery with nuts or raisins and dressed with mayonnaise
  • Wallace -  English naturalist who formulated a concept of evolution that resembled Charles Darwin's (1823-1913); English writer noted for his crime novels (1875-1932); Scottish insurgent who led the resistance to Edward I; in 1297 he gained control of Scotland briefly until Edward invaded Scotland again and defeated Wallace and subsequently executed him (1270-1305)
  • Walnut -  nut of any of various walnut trees having a wrinkled two-lobed seed with a hard shell; any of various trees of the genus Juglans; hard dark-brown wood of any of various walnut trees; used especially for furniture and paneling
  • Wasabi -  the thick green root of the wasabi plant that the Japanese use in cooking and that tastes like strong horseradish; in powder or paste form it is often eaten with raw fish; a Japanese plant of the family Cruciferae with a thick green root
  • Watercress -  of a moderate yellow-green color that is greener and deeper than moss green and yellower and darker than pea green;  cresses that grow in clear ponds and streams; any of several water-loving cresses
  • Watermelon -  large oblong or roundish melon with a hard green rind and sweet watery red or occasionally yellowish pulp; an African melon
  • Wealthy -  having an abundant supply of money or possessions of value
  • White mulberry -  Asiatic mulberry with white to pale red fruit; leaves used to feed silkworms
  • White mustard -  Eurasian mustard cultivated for its pungent seeds; a source of table mustard and mustard oil
  • White rice -  having husk or outer brown layers removed
  • Whitewash -  a specious or deceptive clearing that attempts to gloss over failings and defects; wash consisting of lime and size in water; used for whitening walls and other surfaces; a defeat in which the losing person or team fails to score;  exonerate by means of a perfunctory investigation or through biased presentation of data; cover with whitewash; cover up a misdemeanor, fault, or error
  • Wild apple -  any of numerous wild apple trees usually with small acid fruit
  • Wild rice -  grains of aquatic grass of North America; perennial aquatic grass of North America bearing grain used for food
  • William Clark -  United States explorer who (with Meriwether Lewis) led an expedition from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River; Clark was responsible for making maps of the area (1770-1838)
  • Wilson -  a peak in the San Juan mountains of Colorado (14,246 feet high); 28th President of the United States; led the United States in World War I and secured the formation of the League of Nations (1856-1924); United States literary critic (1895-1972); Scottish physicist who invented the cloud chamber (1869-1959); United States entomologist who has generalized from social insects to other animals including humans (born in 1929); American Revolutionary leader who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence (1742-1798); Canadian geophysicist who was a pioneer in the study of plate tectonics (1908-1993); United States physicist honored for his work on cosmic microwave radiation (born in 1918); Scottish ornithologist in the United States (1766-1813); English writer of novels and short stories (1913-1991); author of the first novel by an African American that was published in the United States (1808-1870)
  • Wilt disease -  any plant disease characterized by drooping and shriveling; usually caused by parasites attacking the roots
  • Wilting -  causing to become limp or drooping
  • Winesap -  crisp apple with dark red skin
  • Winged bean -  a tuberous twining annual vine bearing clusters of purplish flowers and pods with four jagged wings; Old World tropics
  • Winter savory -  resinous leaves used in stews and stuffings and meat loaf; erect perennial subshrub having pink or white flowers and leathery leaves with a flavor of thyme; southern Europe
  • Wintergreen -  spicy red berrylike fruit; source of wintergreen oil; any of several evergreen perennials of the genus Pyrola; creeping shrub of eastern North America having white bell-shaped flowers followed by spicy red berrylike fruit and shiny aromatic leaves that yield wintergreen oil
  • Woodcock -  game bird of the sandpiper family that resembles a snipe
  • Wrack -  dried seaweed especially that cast ashore; the destruction or collapse of something; growth of marine vegetation especially of the large forms such as rockweeds and kelp;  smash or break forcefully
  • Wrangler -  someone who argues noisily or angrily; a cowboy who takes care of the saddle horses
  • Wright -  someone who makes or repairs something (usually used in combination); United States early feminist (born in Scotland) (1795-1852); influential United States architect (1869-1959); United States aviation pioneer who (with his brother Wilbur Wright) invented the airplane (1871-1948); United States aviation pioneer who (with his brother Orville Wright) invented the airplane (1867-1912); United States writer whose work is concerned with the oppression of African Americans (1908-1960); United States writer of detective novels (1888-1939)
  • Xanthosoma -  tropical American tuberous perennials
  • Xanthosoma sagittifolium -  tropical American aroid having edible tubers that are cooked and eaten like yams or potatoes
  • Xerophyllum tenax -  plant of western North America having woody rhizomes and tufts of stiff grasslike basal leaves and spikes of creamy white flowers
  • Yerba buena -  trailing perennial evergreen herb of northwestern United States with small white flowers; used medicinally
  • Young -  being in its early stage; (used of living things especially persons) in an early period of life or development or growth; (of crops) harvested at an early stage of development; before complete maturity; not tried or tested by experience; suggestive of youth; vigorous and fresh;  any immature animal; young people collectively; United States religious leader of the Mormon Church after the assassination of Joseph Smith; he led the Mormon exodus from Illinois to Salt Lake City, Utah (1801-1877); United States baseball player and famous pitcher (1867-1955); English poet (1683-1765); United States jazz tenor saxophonist (1909-1959); British physicist and Egyptologist; he revived the wave theory of light and proposed a three-component theory of color vision; he also played an important role in deciphering the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone (1773-1829); United States civil rights leader (1921-1971); United States film and television actress (1913-2000)
  • Yucca -  any of several evergreen plants of the genus Yucca having usually tall stout stems and a terminal cluster of white flowers; warmer regions of North America
  • Yucca baccata -  tall yucca of the southwestern United States and Mexico having a woody stem and stiff swordlike pointed leaves and a large cluster of white flowers
  • Yucca glauca -  yucca of west central United States having a clump of basal grasslike leaves and a central stalk with a terminal raceme of small whitish flowers
  • Zanthoxylum -  deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs: prickly ash
  • Zea mays -  tall annual cereal grass bearing kernels on large ears: widely cultivated in America in many varieties; the principal cereal in Mexico and Central and South America since pre-Columbian times
  • Zinc deficiency -  a deficiency caused by inadequate zinc in the diet or by liver disease or cystic fibrosis or other diseases
  • Zinfandel -  dry fruity red wine from California; small black grape grown chiefly in California; transplanted from Europe
  • Zingiber -  tropical Asiatic and Polynesian perennial plants: ginger
  • Zucchini -  small cucumber-shaped vegetable marrow; typically dark green; marrow squash plant whose fruit are eaten when small

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