The free dictionary of medicine

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Table of contents:

.A | .B | .C | .D | .E | .F | .G | .H | .I | .J | .K | .L | .M

.N | .O | .P | .Q | .R | .S | .T | .U | .V | .W | .X | .Y | .Z

  • 'Adipo cellular (ad-ip-o-sel'-u-lar). Made up of fat and connective tissue.
  • (de) Morgan's Spots. See Morgan's (de) Spots.
  • (de) Mussey's Point, de M.'s Symptom. See Mussey's (de) Point.
  • -Cardiokinetic (kar-de-o-kin-et'-ik) (cardio-; tctveev, to move). 1. Exciting the heart- action. 2. An agent which excites the action of the heart.
  • -ffisculus (es'-ku-lus) (L.). A genus of sapin- daceous shrubs and trees; buckeye. JE.
  • -ite (-it). 1. A suffix employed in mineral- ogy to denote a mineral or of mineral origin. 2. A suffix employed in chemistry for the salt of an acid that has the suffix -ous.
  • -itis (-i-tis) (exec, inflammation). A suffix used to denote inflammation. 1. The tonsil. 2. A small lobule on the Amygmus]] (am-ig' -mus) (dptuyfioc). lower surface of each cerebellar hemisphere, tion.
  • AEROTHORAX 32 AFFUSIO Aerothorax (a-er-o-tho'-raks). See Pneumothorax.
  • ALBICANTIA 37 ALBUMINOSE Albicantia (al-be-kan' 'she-ah) (L.). Plural of Albicans (i). Albini's Nodules. Small nodules found on the free edge of the auriculoventricular valves in some infants.
  • ALKARGEN 43 ALLOGOTROPHIA Alkargen (al-kar'-jen) (alkarsin; ytvvdv, to produce). Dimethylarsenic acid, obtained from alkarsin by the action of water.
  • Ablepharon (ah-blef -ar-on) (see Ablepharia). Absence of the eyelids.
  • Ablepharous (ah-blef -ar -us) (see Ablepharia). Without eyelids.
  • Ablepsia (ah-blep' -se-ah) (afiXeifica, without sight). 1. Blindness. 2. Dulness of percep- tion.
  • Abluent (ab'-lu-ent) (abluere, to wash away). Detergent. That which cleanses or washes away.
  • Ablution (ab-lu'-shun) (see Abluent). Washing or cleansing the body. Separation of chemic impurities by washing.
  • Abnormal (ab-nor' -mat) (ab, away from; nor- ma, a law). Not normal; not conformable with nature or with the general rule.
  • Abnormity, Abnormality (ab-nor' -mit-e, ab- nor-mal'-it-e. The quality of being abnormal; a deformity or malformation.
  • Abomasum (ab-o-ma'-sum) (ab, away; oma- sum, paunch). The reed or proper digestive stomach of ruminating mammals ; also called "fourth," or "true," stomach.
  • Aboral (ab-o'-ral) (ab, away from; os, the mouth). Opposite to, or remote from, the mouth.
  • Abort (ab-ort') (ab, from; ortus, from oriri, to grow). 1. To miscarry; to expel the fetus before it is viable. 2. To prevent full development, as of a disease. 3. To come short of full development.
  • Abortient (ab-or'-shent) (see Abort). Abort- ive; abortifacient.
  • Abortifacient (ab-or-te-fa' -shent) (abortus; fa- cere, to make). 1. Causing abortion. 2. A drug or agent inducing the expulsion of the fetus.
  • Abortionist (ab-or'-shun-ist) (see Abortion). One who criminally produces abortions; especially one who follows the business of producing abortions.
  • Abortive (ab-or'-tiv) (see Abortion). Pre- maturely born; coming to an untimely end; incompletely developed; cutting short the course of a disease; abortifacient.
  • Abortus (ab-or'-tus) (L.). An aborted fetus; abortion.
  • Aboulia (ah-boo' -le-ah) . See Abulia.
  • Aboulomania (ah-boo-lo-ma' -ne-ah) . See Abu- lomania.
  • Abrachia (ah -bra' -ke -ah) (a, priv.; ftpa- X'tojv, arm). The condition of an armless monster.
  • Abrachiocephalia (ah - bra -ke-o-sef-a'- le-ah) (abrachius; necfraXr, head). Absence of the head and arms.
  • Abrachius (ah-bra' -ke-us) (see Abrachia). A monster without arms.
  • Abrasio (ab-ra' -ze-o) (L.). An abrasion. A. corneas, a scraping off of the superficial epi- thelium of the cornea.
  • Abrasion (ab-ra' -zhun) (ab, from; radere, to rub). The rubbing off of the cutaneous or mucous surface by an injury.
  • Abrin (a'-brin). The chemic ferment or poison- ous principle of jequirity. It has been em- ployed in the study of immunity.
  • Abrin. Infusions applied to the conjunc- tiva or to any mucous surface induce violent purulent inflammation with growth of false membrane. It is used in producing artificial conjunctivitis.
  • Abrotanum (ab-rof -an-um) (afipoxovov, an aromatic plant). The plant called southern- wood, Artemisia abrotanum.
  • Abrus (a'-brus) (afipoc, pretty). Jequirity; In- dian licorice. The seeds of A. precatorius, or wild licorice. Its properties are thought to be due to the presence of certain ferments.
  • Abscissae (absis'se) (ab, away; scindere, to cut). The transverse lines cutting vertical ones at right angles, to show by a diagram the relations of two series of facts, as, e. g., the number of pulse-beats or the temperature record in given periods of time.
  • Abscission (absish'-un) (see Abscissa), Re- moval of a part by cutting.
  • Absinthe (ab'sinth). See under Absinthium.
  • Absinthiate (absin'-the-dt). A salt of absin- thic acid.
  • Absinthiated (absin'-the-a-ted). i. Mixed with absinthe. 2. Containing wormwood.
  • Absinthin (absinth' -in) (absinthium). A bitter crystalline principle obtainable from worm- wood. See Absinthium.
  • Absinthism (absinth' -izm). A disease similar to alcoholism, the result of the excessive use of absinthe. It is characterized by general muscular debility and mental disturbances, that may proceed to convulsions, acute mania, or general paralysis.
  • Absinthol (absinth' -of), C 10 H 16 O. The prin- cipal constituent of oil of wormwood; it is isomeric with ordinary camphor.
  • Absorb (absorb') (absorbere, to suck up). To suck up or imbibe; to take within one's self.
  • Absorbefacient (absorb-e-fa'shent) (absorptio, absorption; facere, to make). Favoring or tending to produce absorption.
  • Absorbent (absor'-bent) (see Absorb). 1.
  • Absorbing; capable of absorbing. 2. An organ or part that absorbs. 3. A term ap- plied to the lacteals and lymphatics. 4. In materia medica, a drug or medicine that pro- duces -absorption of diseased tissue. A. Glands. See Lymphatics. A. System, the lacteals and lymphatics with their associated glands.
  • Absorptiometer (absorpshe-om' -et-er) (absorp- tion; /ihpoi>, a measure). A device for measur- ing the thickness of the layer of liquid that is taken up between two glass plates by capillary attraction. Used in conjunction with a spectrophotometer, it serves as a hematoscope.
  • Absorptive (absorp'-tiv) (see Absorb). Having the power or function of absorbing.
  • Abstergent (abster'-jent) (abs, from; tergere, to cleanse). Cleansing; detergent. See Deter- gent.
  • Abstersive (abster'siv) (abstersivus). Abster- gent.
  • Abstract (ab'strakt) (abstrahere, to draw away). In pharmacy, a solid preparation in which two parts of the drug are represented by one part of the abstract (which is compounded with milk-sugar). Abstracts are double the strength of the nuidextracts.
  • Abterminal (ab-ter' -min-al) (ab, from; ter- minus, end). Passing from tendinous into muscular tissue (used of electric currents).
  • Abulia (ah-bu'-le-ah) (a, priv.; ^ouXr), will). Loss or defect of will-power.
  • Abulic (ah-bu'-lik) (see Abulia). Character- ized by or affected with abulia.
  • Abulomania (ah-bu-lo-ma' -ne-ah) (abulia; fxavca, madness). A disease of the mind characterized by imperfect or lost will- power.
  • Abuse (ab-us') (abusus, a using up). Rape.
  • AcUtorsion (ak-u-tor' -shun) (acus, a needle; torsion). The twisting of an artery with a needle as a means of controlling hemorrhage.
  • Acanthial (ak-an' -the-al) (see Acanthion). Per- taining to the acanthion.
  • Acanthion (ak-an' -the-on) (amvdtov, a little thorn). A point at the base of the nasal spine.
  • Acanthoma (ak-an-tho' -mah) (anavda, a spine). A localized excessive growth in any part of the prickle-cell layer of the skin.
  • Acanthosis (ak-an-tho' -sis) (amvOa, a spine). Any skin disease marked by abnormities in the prickle-cell layer. A. nigricans, a gen- eral pigmentation of the skin, with papillary, mole -like growths.
  • Acardiac (ah-kar'-de-ak). 1. Having no heart. 2. A fetus with no heart.
  • Acardiacus (ah-kar -di' -ak-us) (see Acardia). A synonym employed by German writers for omphalosite. A. acephalus, one in which the head is wanting, the thorax rudimentary, the pelvis and contiguous parts perfectly formed. A. amorphus, a shapeless lump with only rudiments of organs.
  • Acardius (ah-kar' -de-us) . Affected with con- genital absence of the heart. An acardiac monster.
  • Acariasis (ak-ar-i'-as-is). See Mange.
  • Acarid, Acaridan (ak'-ar-id, ak-ar' -id-an) ((XKapTjc, small; tiny). Pertaining to Acarus.
  • Acarinosis (ak-ar -in-o' -sis) (acarus, a mite). Any disease, as the itch, -produced by a mite or acarid.
  • Acarodermatitis (ak-ar -o-der -mat-i' -tis) (acarus, a mite; dermatitis). Dermatitis caused by acari, or mites.
  • Acarpia (ah-kar p'-e-ah) (amp-nca). Sterility; barrenness; unfruitfulness.
  • Acarus (ak'-ar-us) (a, priv.; nt-'cpecv, to cut (because so small)). The mite, or tick, a parasite of man. and animals. A. scabiei, Sarcoptes scabiei, the itch-mite, a small para- site with numerous sharp tubercles, spines, and hairs on the dorsal surface. See Scabies.
  • Acataphasia (ah-kat-aj-a'-ze-ah) (a, priv.; Kara, after; (j>aocg, utterance). A disorder in the syntactical arrangement of uttered speech, due to some central lesion.
  • Acathectic (ak-ah-thek'-tik) (amOsa-dc, unre- tained). A term applied by Liebermeister to that form of icterus caused by pathologic changes in the liver-cells, through which they become unable to retain their secretion.
  • Acaudal, Acaudate (ah-kaw'-dal, ah-kaw'-ddt) (a, priv.; cauda, a tail). Tailless.
  • Acceleration (ak-sel-er-a' -shun) (accelerare, to hasten). Quickening, as of the rate of the pulse or of the respiration.
  • Accentuation (ak-sen-tu-a' -shun) (accentuare). Increased loudness or distinctness.
  • Accessory (ak'-ses-o-re or ak-ses'-o-re) (acces- sorizes). A term applied to certain glands, muscles, ducts, nerves, arteries, etc., that are auxiliary in function, course, etc., to the prin- cipal. Certain small muscles, as the lumbri- cales, are regarded as accessory to more im- portant muscles.
  • Accidental (ak-se-denf -at) (accidentalis). 1. Due to, or caused by, an accident. 2. In- tercurrent; having no essential connection with other conditions or symptoms.
  • Accipiter (ak-sip' -it-er) (L., " a hawk "). A facial bandage with tails radiating like the claws of a hawk. A. quinqueceps, a five-headed accipiter bandage. A. triceps, a three- headed accipiter bandage.
  • Acclimatation, Acclimation, Acclimatiza- tion (ak-li-mat-a' -shun, ak-lim-a' -shun, ak- li-mat-iz-a' -shun) (ad, to; clima, climate). The process of becoming accustomed to the climate, soil, water, etc., of a country to which a plant, animal, person, or a people has removed.
  • Accouchement (a-koosh-mon(g)) (Fr.). The French term for childbirth. A. force, rapid and forcible delivery with the hand.
  • Accoucheur (a-koo-shur) (Ft.). A professional male assistant at childbirth.
  • Accoucheuse (a-koo-shu(r)z) (Fr.). A midwife.
  • Accretion (ak-re' -shun) (ad, to; crescere, to increase), i. A term denoting the manner by which _ crystalline and certain organic forms increase their material substance. 2. The adherence of parts normally separate.- 3. An accumulation of foreign matter in any cavity.
  • Accumulation (ak-u-mu-la' -shun) (accumulare, to heap up). An amassing or collecting to- gether. A., Fecal, an excessive aggregation of feces in the large intestine; coprostasis.
  • Accumulator iak-u' ' -mu-la-tor) (accumulare, to heap up). An apparatus to store electricity. A. C. E. Mixture. An anesthetic mixture com- posed of alcohol, 1 part; chloroform, 2 parts; ether, 3 parts. See Anesthetic.
  • Acelia, Acoelia (ah-se' -le-ah) (a, priv.; nodca, a cavity). The absence of a natural cavity. Syn., Acelosis.
  • Acentric (ah-sen'-trik) (a, priv.; Kkvxpov, cen- ter). Not eccentric; not originating in, or pertaining to, a nerve-center; peripheric.
  • Acephalia (ah-se f-a f -le-ah) (a, priv.; K.ea\T), head; napdca, heart). Absence of the head and heart.
  • Acephalocardius (ah-sef-al-o-kar'-de-us). A monster with neither head nor heart.
  • Acephalocheiria, Acephalochiria (ah-sef-al-o- ki'-re-ah) (a, priv.; Kecf>aAr), head ; X £ *P> hand). Absence of the head and hands.
  • Acephalocheirus (ah-se f-al- o-ki'-rus) (see Acephalocheiria). A monster with neither head nor hands.
  • Acephalocyst,Acephalocystis(a/i-^/'-a/-o-jw/, ah-sef-al-o-sist 1 '-is) (a, priv.; K£aXr), head; ardfia, mouth). Absence of the head, with a mouth-like opening on the superior aspect.
  • Acephalostomus (ah-sej-al-os' -to-mus) (see Acephalostomia). A monster without a head, but with a mouth-like aperture.
  • Acephalous iah-sef -al-us) (ankcjiakoc, headless). Headless.
  • Acercus (ah-ser'-kus) (anspKoc, without a tail). A monstrosity without a tail or the coccy- geal vertebra.
  • Acerdol (as'-er-dol), MnO ? K 2 KOH. An oxi- dation-product of potassium and manganese. It is used as an oxidizer and disinfectant.
  • Acervulus, A. cerebri (as-er' -vu-lus ser'-e-bri). Concretionary matter near the base of the pineal gland, consisting of alkaline phosphates and car- bonates, with amyloid matter. Syn., Brain- sand.
  • Acescence (as-es'-ens) (acescere, to grow sour), i. The process of becoming sour; the qual- ity of being somewhat sour. 2. A disease of wines, whereby they become sour, owing to the agency of Mycoderma aceti.
  • Acesodyne  Acesodynous (ah-ses'-o-din, ah-ses- od'-in-us) (diceawduvoc). Allaying pain; ano- dyne.
  • Acestoma (as-es'-to-mah) (ain-o-oc, curable). The mass of young granulation tissue which later forms the cicatrix.
  • Acetabular (as-et-aV '-u-lar) (acetabulum, a cup). Pertaining to the acetabulum.
  • Acetabulum (as-et-ab' -u-lum) (see Acetabular). A cup-shaped depression on the outer aspect of the innominate bone for the reception of the head of the femur. A. cotyle, the articu- lar cavity of the innominate bone. A. uter- ina, a placental cotyledon.
  • Acetaldehyd (as-et-aV -de-hid). The normal aldehyd; ethaldehyd. See Aldehyd.
  • Acetamid (as-et'-am-id), C 2 H 5 NO. A white, crystalline solid produced by distilling am- monium acetate, or by heating ethyl acetate with strong aqueous ammonia. It combines with both acids and metals to form unstable compounds.
  • Acetate (as'-et-dt) (see Acetic). Any salt of acetic acid.
  • Acetin (as'-et-in) (acetum, vinegar), C 3 H 5 - (C 2 H 3 2 ) 3 . A chemic compound formed by the union of glycerol and acetic acid.
  • Acetoarsenite ias-et-o-ar' -sen-it). A salt com- posed of an acetate and an arsenite of the same base.
  • Acetobromid (as-et-o-bro'-mid). An acetic- acid salt in which part of the hydrogen of the acid radicle has been replaced by bromin.
  • Acetoglycocoll ( as - et - - glV - ko - kol ) , CH 2 <^p/-N Vt 2 3 " A substance resembling a monobasic acid, obtained from the action of acetyl chlorid on glycocoll silver and of acetamid on monochloracetic acid; it is soluble in alcohol; melts at 206 C. Syn., Acetamidoacetic acid ; Aceturic acid.
  • Acetoiodid (as-et-o-i'-o-did). A double salt containing the acetate and iodid of the same radicle.
  • Acetol (as'-et-ol). 1. See Acetyl Carbinol. 2. A remedy for toothache, said to consist of acetic acid, 8.46 %; alum, 3.07 % ; water, 88.5 %; with a small proportion of essential oils of sage, clove, and peppermint.
  • Acetoluid (as-e-toV -u-id), C 7 H 7 NH . C 2 H 3 0.
  • Acetometer (us-et-om' -et-er) (acetum, vinegar; fihpov, a measure). An instrument used in the quantitative determination of acetic acid.
  • Acetonasthma (as-et-on-az' '-mah) (acetone; as- thma). Attacks of dyspnea similar to uremic asthma, accompanied with restlessness, head- ache, nausea, vomiting, transient amaurosis, and acetonuria.
  • Acetonemia (as-et-on-e' -me-ah) (acetone; al/ia, blood). The presence of acetone in the blood.
  • Acetones (as' -et-onz) . A class of compounds that may be regarded as consisting of two alcoholic radicles united by the group CO, or as aldehyds in which hydrogen of the group COH has been replaced by an alcoholic radicle.
  • Acetonin (as-et'-on-in). 1. A body produced by the action of ammonia on acetone. 2. Dihydrotriacetonamin.
  • Acetonoresorcinol. See Acetone Resorcinol.
  • Acetonuria (as-et-o-nu' -re-ah) (acetone; odpov, urine). The presence of acetone in the urine.
  • Acetonyl (as-et'-on-il), CH 2 — CO— CH 3 . A univalent radicle obtained from acetone by taking away one atom of hydrogen.
  • Acetoorthotoluid. An antipyretic resembling acetanilid. The dose is not accurately de- termined.
  • Acetophenone (as-et-o-je'-non), C H 5 (CO)- (CH 3 V Hypnone ; a hypnotic and antisep- tic. It results from the action of zinc methyl upon benzoyl chlorid and crystallizes in la) ge plates, melts at 20. 5 and boils at 202 . It is without satisfactory action. Dcse 4-15 min. (0.26-1.0 Cc).
  • Acetous (as-e'-tus) (acetum, vinegar). Resem- bling vinegar; pertaining to or charged with vinegar or acetic acid.
  • Acetozone (as-et'-o-zon). See Benzoylacetyl- peroxid.
  • Acetparatoluid (as-et-par-ah-toV -u-id), C 9 H n - NO. Antipyretic, colorless crystals, slightly soluble in water, moderately soluble in alcohol; it melts at 149 C. Dose 15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.). Syn., Acetparamidotoluol ; Paratolylacetamid.
  • Acetphenetidin (as-et-fe-nef -id-in) (acetum; phenol). A compound derived from phenol, having antipyretic and antineuralgic proper- ties. It is crystalline, tasteless, and almost insoluble in water. Dose 4-30 gr. (0.26-2.0 Gm.). Syn., Phenacetin.
  • Acetum (as -e'- turn) (L.; gen., aceti; pi., aceta). Vinegar. An impure, dilute acetic acid produced by acetous fermentation of wine, cider, or other fruit-juice. In phar- macy, a solution of the active principles of certain drugs in dilute acetic acid. A.
  • Acetylization (as-et-il-i-za'-shun). The act of combining with or producing compounds of acetic acid or acetyl.
  • Ache (dk) (AS., acan, to ache). Any con- tinuous or throbbing pain.
  • Acheilous (oh-ki'-lus) (see Acheilia). Without lips.
  • Acheiria (ah-ki'-re-ah) (d, priv.; %£~cp, a hand). The congenital absence of hands.
  • Acheirous (ah-ki'-rus) (see Acheiria). Affected with acheiria.
  • Achilia (ah-ki'-le-ah). See Acheilia.
  • Achilles Tendon (ak-il'-ez ten' -don). The ten- don of the gastrocnemius and soleus mus- cles, inserted into the back of the heel.
  • Achillobursitis (ak-il-o-bur-si' -tis) (achilles ten- don; bursitis). Inflammation of the bursas lying approximate to the achilles tendon.
  • Achillodynia (ak-il-o-din f -e-ah) (achilles ten- don; odbvq, pain). Pain referred to the inser- tion of the achilles tendon.
  • Achillotomy (ak-il-ot' '-o-me) (achilles tendon; TOfiTj, a cutting). The subcutaneous division of the achilles tendon.
  • Achlorhydria (ah-klor-hi'-dre-ah) (a, priv.; ylojpbc, green; udcop, water). Absence of free hydrochloric acid from the gastric juice.
  • Achloropsia (ah-klor-op 1 '-se-ah) (d, priv.; yXoupbc, green; b^cc, vision). Green-blindness.
  • Acholuria (ah-kol-u'-re-ah) (d, priv.; jo^tj, bile; oupov, urine). The absence of bile-pigment in the urine.
  • Achor (a'-kor) (a%u)p, chaff, scurf, or dandruff). Crusta lactea, a small pustule, followed by a scab, upon the heads of infants; milk-crust.
  • Achoresis (ah-kor-e'-sis) (d, priv.; %a>phv, to make room; pi., achoreses). Grossi's term for the diminished capacity of a hollow organ, as of the bladder. Syn., Achoria. Cf . S ten ochoria.
  • Achroma tin (ah-kro' -mat-in) (d, priv.; ^w/xa, color). The groundwork of the nucleus of a cell; it is so called because it is not readily stained by coloring agents.
  • Achroma (ah-kro' '-mah) (d, priv.; ypajfia, color). Absence of color; albinism. Syn., Achrom- asia; Achromatia ; Achromatosis ; Achromo- dermia ; Vitiligo. A., Congenital. See Albin- ism. A. cutis. See Leukoderma.
  • Achromacyte (ah-kro' -mas-it) (a, priv.; xpu>p.a, color; kutoc, cell). A degenerated, decolor- ized erythrocyte; a "phantom" or shadow corpuscle. Syn., TonfcVs shadow corpuscle; Bizzozerd* s blood-platelet ; Hayem's corpuscle or hematoblast.
  • Achromatic (ah-kro-mat'-dk) (d, priv.; xp(bp.a, color). Without color. A. Lens, one the dispersing power of which is exactly neu- tralized by another lens with the same cur- vature, but having a different refractive index.
  • Achromatism (ah-kro' -mat-izm) (d, priv.; ip&>p.a, color). Absence of chromatic aberra- tion.
  • Achromatophil (ah-kro-mal'-o-fil) (d, priv.; Xpcbfia, color; cXecv, to love). 1. Showing no affinity for stains. 2. A microbe or his- tologic element which does not stain readily.
  • Achromatopsia (ah-kro-mat-op' -se-ah) (a, priv.; Xptipta, color; o chyme). Deficient formation of chyme.
  • Achymous (ah-ki'-mus) (see Achymosis). De- ficient in chyme.
  • Acicular (as-ik' -u-lar) (acus, a needle). Needle- like.
  • Acidalbumin (as-id-al-bu'-min). A proteid acted upon or dissolved in the stronger acids, and yielding an acid reaction.
  • Acidifiable (as-id-i-fi'-a-bl) (acidum, acid; fieri, to become). Capable of becoming an acid or of becoming sour.
  • Acidifiant (as -id -if -i- ant) (see Acidifiable'). Acid-forming.
  • Acidification (as-id' -if-ik-a-shun) (acidum, acid; facere, to make). Conversion into an acid; the process of becoming sour.
  • Acidimeter (as-id-im'-et-er) (acidum, acid; jdzpov, a measure). An instrument for per- forming acidimetry.
  • Acidimetry (as-id-im' -et-re) (see Acidimeter). Determination of the free acid in a solution by an acidimeter or by chemic reactions.
  • Acidity (as-id' -it-c) (acidum, acid). The quality of being acid; sourness; excess of acid.
  • Acidophil, Acidophile (as-id' -o-fil) (acidum, acid; (p'cloc, loving). 1. Susceptible of im- bibing acid stains. 2. A substance having an affinity for acid stains.
  • Acidosis (a s -id -0' -sis) (aqidum, acid). Acid con- ditions producing the comatogenous states of diabetes.
  • Acidoxyl (as-id -oks'-il). A compound of an acidyl or acid radicle with oxygen.
  • Acidulated (as-id' -u-la-ted) (acidulare, to make sour). Somewhat sour or acid.
  • Acidulous (as-id' -u-lus) (zee Acidulated). Mod- erately sour.
  • Acidum (as' -id-um) (L.). See Acid.
  • Acinesia (as-in-e'-ze-ah). See Akinesia.
  • Acinetic (as-in-et'-ik). See Akinetic.
  • Aciniform (as-in'-if-orm) (acinus, a grape). Grape-like.
  • Acinose (as'-in-oz). See Acinous.
  • Acinotubular (as-in-o-tu! -bu-lar) (acinus, a ACINOUS 22 ACNE grape; tubulus, a tube). Applied to a gland or other structure having tubular acini or secreting sacs.
  • Acinous (as'-in-us) (acinus, a grape), i. Re- lating to an acinus or having acini. 2. Re- sembling a grape or a cluster of grapes; composed of granular concretions.
  • Acinus (as'-in-us) (acinus, a grape; pi., acini). Any one of the smallest lobules of a com- pound gland, as an acinus of the liver.
  • Acleidian (ah-kli' -de-an) (a, priv.; /ole/c, the collar-bone). Without clavicles.
  • Acme iak'-me) (clk/it), a point). The highest point of anything. The critical stage of a disease; the crisis.
  • Acmon (ak'-mon) (aKjxcov, an anvil). The incus.
  • Acnemous (ak'-ne-mus) (a, priv.; kvtjjxt, leg). Having imperfect calves; having no legs.
  • Acoin (ak'-o-in). Hydrochlorate of diparaany- silmonoparaphenetylguanidin, a white powder, used in infiltration anesthesia by Schleich's method in a i: iooo solution of 0.8% solution of sodium chlorid; also in 1 % aqueous solu- tion in ophthalmology.
  • Aconite (ak'-on-it). See Aconitum.
  • Aconitic Acid (ak - on - it' - ik) . See Acid, Aconitic.
  • Acromyle (ak-rom' -il-e) (anpov, point; pbXr,, patella). The patella.
  • Acroneurosis (ak-ro-nu-ro 1 'sis) (axpov, extrem- ity; veupov, a nerve). Any neurosis manifest- ing itself in the extremities.
  • Acronychous (ak-ron'-ik-us) (ciKpovoyoc). Fur- nished with claws, nails, or hoofs; achro- nychous.
  • Acronyx (ak'-ro-niks) (fixpov, extremity; ovu£, a nail). Ingrowing of the nail.
  • Acroparalysis (ak-ro-par-aV -is-is) (anpov, ex- tremity; TiapaXuocc, palsy). Paralysis of the extremities.
  • Acroparesthesia (ak -ro - par - es - the' - ze - ah) (anpov, extremity; napot, around; a'codrjocc;, sensation). Abnormal or perverted sensation in the extremities.
  • Acropathology (ak-ro-path-ol'-o-je) (anpov, ex- tremity; rcaOoc, disease; koyoc, treatise). The pathology of the extremities.
  • Acropathy (ak-ro p' -a-the) (dupov, extremity; nadoc, disease). Any disease of the extremities.
  • Acrophobia (ak-ro-fo'-be-ah) (dupov, a height; 6floc, fear). Morbid dread of being at a great height.
  • Acrose (ak'-roz). A substance isolated from the condensation-products of glycerose (an oxidation-product of glycerol) and formalde- hyd, and forming the starting-point for the synthesis of fruit-sugar, grape-sugar, and mannose.
  • Acrotarsium (ak-ro-tar' -se-um) (anpov, the sum- mit; rapaoc, the tarsus). The instep.
  • Acroteric (ak-ro-ter'-ik) (aKpajx^pca, the ex- tremities). Relating to the extremities; ap- plied to conditions in which the extremities are most affected.
  • Acrotic (ah-krot'-ik) (a, priv.; Kpo-og, a stak- ing). Relating to acrotism.
  • Acrotism (ah'-krot-izm) (see Acrotic), Any de- fective beating of the pulse; failure of the pulse.
  • Acrylaldehyd (ak-ril-aV -de-hid). See Acrolein.
  • Acsadia. (ah-kar' -de -ah) (a, priv.; napd ca, heart). Congenital absence of the heart.
  • Actinic (ak-tin'-ik) (anzee, a ray). Referring to those rays of the spectrum capable of producing chemic changes; they occur in the violet and ultraviolet parts.
  • Actinism (ak'-lin-izm) (see Actinic). The chemic quality of light.
  • Actinium (ak-tin'-e-um) (see Actinic). A sup- posed element discovered by Phipson in 1881 in association with zinc. It is metallic and is said to resemble titanium.
  • Actinobolia (ak-iin-o-ho' -le-ah) (anTtvofioXiiv, to radiate). 1. A term formerly used to express the process by which the impulses of the will are conveyed to the different parts of the body. 2. Van Helmont's term for the phenomena now included under hypnotism.
  • Actinocerate, Actinocerous (ak-tin-os'-er-dt, -us) (a/v-Wo, a ray; Kepof, a horn). Having horn-like processes radiately arranged.
  • Actinochemistry (ak-lin-o-kem'-is-tre) (d/cric, a ray; yqjisca, chemistry). Chemistry which deals with the decomposition of substances by light.
  • Actinodermatitis (ak - tin - - der -mat - i' - tis) (auric, a ray; dermatitis). Cutaneous lesions produced by application of the rbntgen-rays. Syn., Radiodermatitis.
  • Actinogram (ak-tin' -o-gram) (duxes, a ray; ■fpafetv, to write). The record made by the actinograph.
  • Actinograph (ak-tin' -o-graf). An apparatus to measure the actinism of sunlight.
  • Actinomycotic (ak-tin-o-mi-kof -ik) (see Acti- nomycosis'). Pertaining to or affected with actinomycosis.
  • Actinotherapy (ak-tin-o-ther' '-ap-e) (dxr/c, a ray; departs ta, therapy). The therapeutic use of actinic rays.
  • Active (ak'-tiv) (see Action), i. Energetic; decisive; as, active treatment. 2. Due to an intrinsic force as distinguished from passive — e. g., active hyperemia.
  • Actol (ak'-tol). The commercial name for silver lactate.
  • Actual (ak'-chu-al) (agere, to do or perform). Real; effective. A. Cautery. See Cautery.
  • Actuation (ak-chu-a' '-shun) (see Actual). The mental function that is exercised be- tween the impulse of volition and its per- formance.
  • Acuclosure (ak-u-klo' -zhur) (acus, a needle; claudere, to close). A method of arresting hemorrhage by the aid of a needle which holds the artery closed for a day. It em- braces acupressure and acutorsion.
  • Acuition (ak-u-ish' -un) (acuere, to sharpen). Increased effect of a drug's action by the addition of another drug.
  • Acuity (ak-u'-it-e) (see Acuition). Acuteness or clearness, as acuity of vision.
  • Acumeter (ak-u' -met-er) . See Acoumeter.
  • Acuminate (ak-u' -min-at) (acuminatus, pointed; acute). Sharp-pointed.
  • Acupressure (ak' -u-presh-ur) (acus, a needle; pressura, pressure). An operation to stop hemorrhage by compressing the artery with a needle inserted into the tissues upon either side.
  • Acupuncture (ak' -u-punk-chur) (acus, a needle; pungere, to prick). Puncture of the skin or tissue by one or more needles for the relief of pain, the exit of "fluid, the coagulation of blood in an aneurysm, etc.
  • Acusia (ah-koo'-ze-ah). See Acousia (2).
  • Acute (ak-uf) (acutus, sharp). Sharp; sharp- pointed; keen; of diseases, having a rapid onset, a short course, and pronounced symp- toms and termination.
  • Acuteness (ak-uf -nes). The quality of being acute.
  • Acuticostal (ak-ut-i-kos' -tat) (acutus, sharp; costa, a rib). Having projecting ribs.
  • Acyclia (ah-sik' -le-ah) (a, priv. ; nunXe'cv, to circulate). An arrest of the circulation of body-fluids.
  • Adactylism (ah-dak' -til-izm) (a, priv.; d&n- zuXoc, a finger). The absence of the digits.
  • Addition (ad-ish'-un) (addere, to add). The formation of a molecule by the direct union of two or more different molecules without decomposition. A. Compound. See under Compound. A. Product. See under Pro- duct. A. Reaction. See under Reaction.
  • Adducens (a-du'-senz) (adducere, to bring toward). An adductor, a term applied to certain muscles. A. oculi, the internal rectus muscle of the eye.
  • Adducent (a-du'-sent) (see Adducens - ). Per- forming adduction.
  • Adduction (ad-uk' '-shun) (see Adducens). Any movement whereby a part is brought toward another or toward the median line of the body.
  • Adductor (ad-uk' -tor) (see Adducens). Any muscle effecting adduction.
  • Adelodermatous, Adelodermous (ad-el-o-der' - mat-us, ad-el-o-der' -mus) (aorjXoc, not seen; okpjia, skin). Having concealed integument, as invaginated tracts.
  • Adelomorphous (ad-el-o-mor' -us) (adfXoc, not seen; IJ-op(f)rj, form). Not clearly defined; not having a determinate form (a term ap- plied to certain cells in the gastric glands).
  • Adenasthenia (ad-en-as-lhe' -ne-ah) (dof/V, a gland; daOiveca, weakness). A disorder of the stomach characterized by diminished and enfeebled secretion without anatomic lesion.
  • Adenectomy (ad-en-ek' -to-me) (dorp, a gland; iKZOfiTj, excision). The excision of a gland.
  • Adeniform (ad-en' -e-form) (dorp, a gland; forma, resemblance). Of the shape of a gland; gland -like.
  • Adenoblast (ad' -en-o -blast) (dorp, a gland; ftXacruoc, a germ). 1. Any functionally active gland-cell; a cell that assists in the glandular action. 2. Haeckel's name for an embryonic cell which forms a gland.
  • Adenocarcinoma (ad-en -o-kar -sin -0' - mah) ADENOCELE 28 ADENOPHARYNGEAL (ddrjv, a gland; carcinoma). Adenoma blended with carcinoma.
  • Adenocele (ad'-en-o-sel or ad-en-o -se'-le) (ddrjv, a gland; xrjXrj, a tumor). A cystic tumor containing adenomatous elements.
  • Adenocellulitis (ad-en-o -sel-u-W -tis) (ddrjv, a gland; cellulitis). Inflammation of a gland and the surrounding cellular tissue.
  • Adenocyst (ad-en' '-o-sist) (ddrjv, a gland; kuotcc, a cyst). A cystic lymphatic gland; a glandu- lar cyst. Cf. Adenocystoma.
  • Adenocystoma (ad-en-o-sis-to' -mah) (ddrjv, a gland; noouc, a cyst; ojia, a tumor). A cystic adenoma.
  • Adenofibroma (ad-en-o- fi-bro' -mah) (ddrjv, a gland; fibroma). A combination of adenoma and fibroma.
  • Adenofibrosis (ad-en-o-fi-bro' -sis) (ddrjv, a gland; fibrosis). Fibroid degeneration of a gland, particularly the inflammatory neoplasms involving sudoriparous glands, due to infection with Botryomyces. Cf. Botryomycosis.
  • Adenography (ad-en-o g'-ra-fe) (ddrjv, a gland; j-pacbetv, to write). That part of descriptive anatomy which treats of the glandular system.
  • Adenohypersthenia (ad-en-o- hi-per-sthe'-ne- ah) (ddrjv, a gland; bnkp, over; oOivoc, strength), Excessive activity of the glands. A. gastrica, a condition characterized by the secretion of gastric juice abnormally rich in hydrochloric acid or excessive in quantity.
  • Adenolipoma (ad-en-o-lip-o'-mah) (ddf)v, a gland; lipoma). A combination of adenoma and lipoma.
  • Adenolipomatosis (ad-en-o-lip-o-mai-o'-sis) (adenolipoma). A diseased condition of the lymphatic system characterized by fatty de- posits in the neighborhood of the neck, axillas, and groins. It is generally unattended with pain. Syn., Multiple lipomas; Symmetric lipomas of nervous origin.
  • Adenology (ad-en-ol' -o-je) (ddrjv, a gland; Xoyoc, a discourse). The science of the glandular system.
  • Adenolymphoma (ad-en-o -lim- o' -mah) (ddf)v, a gland; lymphoma). A combined adenoma and lymphoma. See Lymphadenoma.
  • Adenomalacia (ad-en-o -mal-a' -she-ah) (ddrjv, a gland; fxakaida, softening). Abnormal soft- ening of a gland.
  • Adenomatome (ad-en-o' -mat-om) (adenoma; rout), a cutting) . Cutting forceps or scissors for use in the removal of adenomatous growths.
  • Adenomeningeal (ad-en-o -men-in' -je-al) (ddrjv, a gland; firjvcjr£, a membrane). Pertaining to or affecting the glands of a membrane.
  • Adenomyoma (ad-en-o -mi-o' -mah) (ddrjv, a gland; fiuc, a muscle; fijia, a tumor). A tumor composed of glandular and muscular tissues. A., Branchiogenic, cyst-formation in consequence of inflammation of the mucous bursa in the median line of the neck.
  • Adenomyxoma (ad-en-o-miks-o' -mah) (ddijv, a gland; fiu£ a, mucus; o/x a, a tumor) . A growth having the characters of adenoma and myxoma.
  • Adenomyxosarcoma (ad-en-o -miks' '-o-sar-ko- mah). A rare combination of malignant tumor forms (observed in the cervix uteri); a primary adenoma with secondary sarcoma and finally myxomatous degeneration of the stromas.
  • Adenopharyngeal (ad-en-o -far -in' -je-al) (ddrjv f ADENOPHARYNGITIS 29 ADIPOMA a gland; (frdpyrg, pharynx). Pertaining to the thyroid gland and the pharynx.
  • Adenopharyngitis (ad-en-o-far-in-ji'-tis) (dorp, a gland; (faapojZ, pharynx; ncc, inflamma- mation). Inflammation of the tonsils and pharynx.
  • Adenophthalmia (ad-en-of-thal'-me-ah) (ddr,v, a gland; 6p.a, blood; puocg, flowing). Failure of the circulation of the blood through the veins, due to some obstruc- tion.
  • Adipatum (ad -ip' -a -turn). An ointment-base said to consist of lanolin, vaselin, paraffin, and water.
  • Adipic (ad-ip'-ik) (adeps, lard). Of or belong- ing to fat. A. Acid. See Acid, Adipic.
  • Adipocele (ad'-ip-o-sel) (adeps; kt.at), hernia). A true hernia with hernia sac, containing only fatty tissue.
  • Adipofibroma (ad-ip-o-fi-bro'-mah) (adeps; fi- broma). A combined fatty and fibrous tumor.
  • Adipolysis (ad-ip-oV '-is-is) (adeps; )jjocc, disso- lution). The cleavage or hydrolysis of fats in the process of digestion by the action of a fat-splitting enzym.
  • Adipoma (ad-ip-o'-mah) (adeps; b t ua, a tumor) A fatty tumor; lipoma.
  • Adipose (ad'-ip-os) (adeps). Fatty. A. Tis- sue, fatty tissue, which is distributed exten- sively through the body. It consists of ar- eolar connect- ive tissue, the cells of which contain fat- globules.
  • Adiposis (ad-ip- o'-sis) (adeps). Corpulence ; fatty infiltra- tion. A. do- lorosa, Der- cum's dis- ease, charac- terized by the formation of soft nodules throughout the connective tis- sue of the body, accompanied by neuralgic pains. A. hepatica, fatty degeneration or infiltration of the liver.
  • Adipositas (ad-ip-os' '-it-as) (L.). Fatness; cor- pulency. A. cordis, a fatty condition of the heart.
  • Adiposity (ad-ip-os' -it-e). Fatness; corpulency.
  • Adipsa (ad-ip'-sah) (neut. pi. of adipsus, with- out thirst). 1. Remedies to allay thirst. 2. Foods which do not produce thirst.
  • Adipsia (ah-dip' -se-ah) (a, priv.; di(pa, thirst). Absence of thirst.
  • Adjuvant (ad'-ju-vant) (adjuvare, to assist). A medicine that assists the action of another to which it is added.
  • Admaxillary (ad-maks' '-il-a-re) . Pertaining to maxillary structures. Cf. Gland, Admaxillary.
  • Adnasal (ad-na'-sal) (ad, near to; nasus, the nose). Pertaining to the nose.
  • Adnexa (ad-neks' -ah) (ad, to; nectere, to join). Adjunct parts, as the adnexa of the uterus. A. bulbi, the appendages of the bulb of the eye. A. uteri, the fallopian tubes and the ovaries.
  • Adolescence (ad-o-les' -ens) (adolescere, to grow). Youth, or the period between puberty and maturity, usually reckoned as extending in males from about 14 to 25 years, and in females from 12 to 21 years.
  • Adorbital (ad-orb' -it-at) (ad, near to; orbita, orbit). Pertaining to the orbit. A. Bone. See Lacrimal Bone.
  • Adrenal (ad-re' -naV) (ad, near to; ren, the kid- ney). 1. Adjacent to the kidney. 2. The suprarenal capsule.
  • Adrenalin (ad-ren'-al-in), C 10 H 15 NO 3 . The active principle of the suprarenal gland. A. Chlorid, used in solution of 1 : 10,000 to 1 : 1000 in surgical operations on the eye, ear, nose, urethra, etc; it is a power- ful astringent, hemostatic, and heart tonic.
  • Adrenoxin (ad-ren-oks'-in) (adrenal; oxygen), Sajous' name for an organic compound or oxidizing substance formed in the lungs by the internal secretion of the adrenals com- bined with the atmospheric oxygen. He claims that this substance endows the blood- plasm with its oxidizing properties.
  • Adrue (ad-ru'-e). Antiemetic root. The root of Cyperus articulatus ; it is anthelmintic, aromatic, stomachic Dose of the ftuidex- tract 20-30 min. (1.3-2.0 Cc). Unof.
  • Adsternal (ad-stern' -al) (ad, near to; sternum). Pertaining to or situated near the sternum.
  • Adstrictio (ad-strik' -she-o) (adstringere, to draw together; pi., adstrictiones). 1. The reten- tion of any natural excretion. 2. The action of an astringent. 3. The ligation of a blood- vessel. A. alvei, constipation.
  • Adventitia (ad-ven-iish' -e^ah) (adventitius, foreign). The external coat of a blood- vessel.
  • Adynamia, Adynamy (ah-din-a' -me-ah, ah- din'-a-me) (a, priv.; obvapcg, power). Defi- ciency or loss of vital or muscular power; prostration.
  • Adynamic (ah-din-am' -ik) (see Adynamia). Per- taining to or characterized by adynamia.
  • Adynamicoataxic (ad-in-am-ik-o-at-aks' -ik) . Pertaining to or characterized by adynamia and ataxia. JE-. For all English words sometimes spelled with the diphthong JE see words beginning E. Aeby, Plane of. In craniometry, one passing through the nasion and basion perpendicular to the median plane.
  • Aerated (a' -er-a-ted) (df)p, the atmosphere). Impregnated or charged with carbon dioxid or air; arterialized.
  • Aeration (a-er-a' '-shun) (df)p, air). The pro- cess of supplying or charging with air or with some gas, such as carbon dioxid; the state of being supplied with air or gas.
  • Aerator (a'-er-a-tor). A machine for forcing gas or air into liquids.
  • Aerial (a-e' -re-al) . Pertaining to the air; con- veyed by the air, as aerial conduction of sound-waves.
  • Aeriform (a-e' -re-form) (df)p, air; forma, form). Resembling air or gas.
  • Aeroanaerobic (a-er-o-an-a-er-o'-bik). Applied to organisms which are both aerobic and anaerobic.
  • Aerobioscope (a-er -o-bi' -o-skop) (df)p, air; ftcoc, life; onoxelv, to examine) . An apparatus, con- sisting of a glass tube of special form, for col- lecting and filtering the bacteria from the air.
  • Aerobiotic (a-er-o-bi-ot'-ik) (df)p, air; (3 coot choc, pertaining to life). Thriving only in the pres- ence of air.
  • Aerodynamics (a-er-o-di-nam 1 '-iks) (df,p, air; dwap.cc, power). The branch of physics that deals with gases in motion.
  • Aerography (a-er-og'-ra-fe) (df)p, air; Ypdrj, a writing). The description of the air and its qualities.
  • Aerology (a-er-ol'-o-je) (drjp, air; Myoc, trea- tise). The science of the air and its qualities.
  • Aerometer (a-er-om' -et-er) (df)p, air; pkzpov, a measure). An instrument for ascertaining the -density of gases.
  • Aerophagy (a-er-of'-a-je) (drjp, air; (payslv, to eat). The imbibing and swallowing of air, especially observed in hysteric patients.
  • Aerophil (a-er'-o-fil) (dt/p, air; cke~cv, to love). An open-air -loving person or creature.
  • Aerophobia (a-er-o-fo' -be-ah) (drjp, air; 6j3o£, fear). Dread of a current of air.
  • Aerophone (a'-er-o-fon) (drjp, air; tovr), sound). An instrument for increasing the amplitude of sound-waves.
  • Aerophore (a' -er-o-for) (df)p, air; (fripscv, to carry), i. A device for the inflation of the lungs of a still-born child with air. 2. A breathing apparatus for the use of firemen and others, to prevent the inhalation of nox- ious gases.
  • Aerophysic (a-er-o-fiz'-ik) (drjp, air; cfiuoav, to in- flate). Inflated; distended with air; flatulent.
  • Aeroplethysmograph (a-er-o-pleth-iz' '-mo-graf) (df)p, air; TtXrjduopoc, an enlargement; ypoKpscv, to write) . An apparatus for registering graph- ically the expired air; the latter raises a very light and carefully equipoised box placed over water, and this moves a writing-style.
  • Aeroporotomy (a-er-o-por-of '-o-me) (drjp, air; Tibpoc, a pore; ropf), a cutting). The opera- tion of admitting air to the lungs, as by intubation or tracheotomy.
  • Aeroscope (a'-er -o-skop) (df)p, air; okotzs'cv, to observe). An instrument for estimating the purity of the air.
  • Aeroscopy (a-er-os'-ko-pe) (see Aeroscope). The investigation of atmospheric conditions.
  • Aerostatics (a-er -o-stat' -iks) (df)p, air; otoxckoc, standing). The branch of physics that treats of the properties of gases at rest.
  • Aerotherapeutics, Aerotherapy (a-er-o-ther-a- pu'-tiks, a-er-o-ther' -ap-e) (df)p, air; dspaneuecv, to heal). A mode of treating disease by compressed or rarefied air or by other gases.
  • Aerothermotherapy (a-er -o-ther-mo-ther' '-ap-e) (df)p, air; dippy, heat; 6 spans ca, therapy). Treatment with hot air.
  • Aerotonometer (a-er-o-ton-om' -et-er) (drjp, air; tovoc, tension; ukzpov, a measure). An in- strument for estimating the tension of gases in the blood.
  • Aerourethroscopy (a-er-o-u-re- thros' -ko-pe) (drjp, air; ouprjdpa, urethra; onoize'cv, to ex- amine). Urethroscopy conjoined with infla- tion of the urethra with air.
  • Aerozol (a'-er-o-zol) (drjp, air; bt^ecv, to smell): A mixture of essential oils said to contain 75 % of ozone; it is used by inhalation in catarrhal affections.
  • Aerteriversion (a-er-ter-iv-er' -shun). See Ar- terioversion.
  • Aerteriverter (a-er-ter-iv-er' -ter). See Arterio- verter.
  • Aerva (a-er'-vah) (Ar.). A genus of plants of the order Amarantacece. A. lanata, a species native of tropical Asia and Arabia. It furnishes chaya-root, which contains a mucilaginous principle and has been used as a diuretic, in strangury, and as a depurative.
  • Aetata (ak-te'-ah) (ami, the elder). A genus of ranunculaceous plants having active medi- cinal qualities. A. alba, the white cohosh, has much the same qualities as A. spicata. A. cimicifuga and A. racemosa are more im- portant. See Cimicijuga. A. rubra, red co- hosh, and A. spicata are purgative and emetic.
  • Afebrile (ah-feb'-ril) (a, priv.; febrilis, fever- ish). Without fever.
  • Affective (af-ek'-tiv) (see Affection). Exciting emotion. A. Faculties, the emotions and pro- pensities, especially those peculiar to man. • A. Insanity, emotional or impulsive insanity.
  • Afferent (a' '-er-ent) (afferens, carrying to). Carrying toward the center. Of nerves : con- veying impulses toward the central nervous system; sensory; centripetal. Of blood-ves- sels: those, as the arteries, conveying blood to the tissues. Of lymphatics : those convey- ing lymph to a lymphatic gland.
  • Afferentia (af-er-en' -she-aK). See Vasa.
  • Affiliation (af-il-e-a'-shun) (ad, to; filius, son). In medical jurisprudence, the act of imput- ing or affixing the paternity of a child in order to provide for its maintenance.
  • Affixion (af-ik'-shun) (afflgere, to fasten). Ad- hesion.
  • Afflux (af'-luks) (affluere, to flow toward). The flow of the blood or other liquid to a part.
  • Affusio (af-u'-se-o) (L.; pi., affusiones), 1. An AFFUSION 33 AGEUSIA affusion. 2. A suffusion. 3. An infusion. 4. A cataract.
  • Affusion (af-u'-zhun) (affundere, to pour upon). The pouring of water upon an object, as upon the body in fever, to reduce tempera- ture and calm nervous symptoms.
  • Agalactia (ah-gal-ak' -te-ali) (a, priv.; yaXa, milk). Failure of secretion of the milk after childbirth.
  • Agar, Agar-agar (a'-gar) (Ceylon). A kind of glue made from certain seaweeds, such as Gracilaria lichenoides and Gigartina speciosa, used in medicine to make suppositories, and in bacteriologic studies in the preparation of culture-mediums.
  • Agaricin (ag-ar' -is-in) (see Agaricus). 1. C 16 - H 30 O 5 -H 2 O. A white, crystalline substance, the active principle of Agaricus albus. It has proved useful in the night-sweats of pul- monary tuberculosis. Dose 2V - To g r - (°-°°3~ 0.006 Gm.). Unof. 2. An alkaloid iden- tical with amanitin.
  • Agarythrin (ag-ar' -ith-rin). A yellowish-white alkaloid extracted by ether from Agaricus rubra and A. sanguinea. It has a bitter taste and leaves a burning sensation in the mouth.
  • Agaster (ah-gas'-ter) (a, priv.; yaarr'jp, the stomach). One without a stomach.
  • Agastric (ah-gas' -trik) (see Agaster). Without an intestinal canal, as the tape-worms.
  • Agathin (ag'-ath-in) \ayadbc, good), C 6 H 4 - (OH).CH.N.N.(CH,).C 6 H 5 . A greenish-white, crystalline substance, obtained by the inter- action of salicylic aldehyd and a-methyl- phenylhydrazin. It is used as an antineuralgic in doses of 8 gr. (0.52 Gm.) 2 or 3 times daily. Its action is cumulative. Unof.
  • Agenesia, Agenesis (ah-jen-e 1 '-se-ah, ah-jen'- es-is) (a, priv. ; yiveotf, generation) . Imperfect development.
  • Agglomerate (ag-lom'-er-dt) (agglomerare, to wind into a ball). Grouped or clustered.
  • Agglutinant (ag-lu' -tin-ant) . See Agglutina- tive.
  • Agglutinate (ag-lu' -tin-at) (see Agglutinant). To glue together; to unite by adhesion.
  • Agglutinatio (ag-lu-tin-a'-she-o) . Agglutina- tion. A. maxillae inferioris, trismus. A. pilorum, the replacement of ingrowing eye- lashes by means of viscous matter on a probe.
  • Agglutination (ag-lu-tin-a' -shun) (agglutinate, to paste to), i. A joining together. 2. A co- ulative phenomenon accompanying hemo- lysis or bacteriolysis, thought by Gruber to be due to some deleterious effect on the membrane of the bacteria or blood-corpuscles which makes it sticky.
  • Agglutinative (ag-lu' '-tin-a-tiv) (see Aggluti- nation). 1. Favoring agglutination; adhesive. 2. Any substance with adhesive properties, fitted to retain the edges of wounds in apposi- tion. 3. A remedy promoting the repair of wounds by favoring nutrition.
  • Agglutitio (ag-lu-tish'-e-o) (ad, against; glutire, to swallow). Difficult deglutition; an ob- struction to swallowing.
  • Aggregate (ag' -re-gat) (ad, to; gregare, to col- lect into a flock). Grouped into a mass.
  • Aggressin (ag-res'-in) (aggressio, an attack). A hypothetic bacterial product which inhibits the protective action of phagocytes, largely by preventing their migration.
  • Aglobulia (ah-glo-bu' -le-ah) (a, priv.; globulus, a globule). A decrease in the quantity of red blood-corpuscles.
  • Aglossia (ah-glos'-e-ah) (a, priv.; yXcoaaa, the tongue). 1. Absence of the tongue. 2. Dumbness; senile impairment of speech.
  • Aglossostomia (ah-glos-o-sto' -me-ah) (a, priv.; jXcbooa, the tongue; aropta, mouth). The condition of a mouth without a tongue.
  • Aglossus (ah-glos'-us) (see Aglossia). A person without a tongue.
  • Agmatology (ag-mat-ol'-o-je) (ay /16c, a frac- ture; Xoyoc, a, discourse) . The science or study of fractures.
  • Agminate (ag'-min-dt) (agmen, a, multitude). Aggregated; clustered. A. Glands. See Gland, Peyer's.
  • Agnail (ag'-nal) (AS., angncegl). 1. Hangnail. 2. A whitlow. 3. A corn.
  • Agnathia (ah-gna'-the-ah) (a, priv.; yvhdog, a jaw). Absence or defective development of the jaws, Agnin (ag'-nin) (agnus, a lamb). A fatty sub- stance derived from sheep's wool.
  • Agnosia (ah-gno' -se-ah) (a, priv.; yvcboacg, a recognizing). Loss of the perceptive faculty which gives recognition of persons and things.
  • Agomphious (ah-gom'-fe-us) (a, priv.; yoiufrcoc, a tooth). Without teeth.
  • Agomphosis (ah-gom-Jo' -sis) (see Agomphious). 1. Absence of the teeth. 2. A loosening of the teeth.
  • Agonal (ag'-on-al) (dyoyvia, a struggle). Strug gling; relating to the death-struggle.
  • Agony (ag'-o-ne) (see Agonal). Violent pain; extreme anguish; the death-struggle.
  • Agrammatism (ah-gram' -at-izm) (a, priv.; ypdp.ua, a word). A phenomenon of aphasia, consisting in the inability to form words gram- matically, or the suppression of certain words of a phrase; a form of aphasia.
  • Agraphic (ah-gra'-fik) (see Agraphia). Affected with agraphia.
  • Agria (ag'-re-ah) (aypioc, wild). A pustular eruption; malignant pustule; herpes.
  • Agrimony (ag'-rim-o-ne) (dypbf, a field; pibvof, alone). The root of Agrimonia eupatoria, a mild astringent. Dose of fluidextract \-2 dr. (2-8 Cc). Unof.
  • Agriothymia (ag-re-o-thi' -me-ah) (aypcog, wild; do p.6c, mind; will). Maniacal fury.
  • Agrippa (ag-rip'-ah) (L.). One born with the feet foremost.
  • Agromania (ag-ro-ma'-ne-ah) (dypbg, a field; fiavca, madness), A mania for living in the country. Agron (East Indian). A disease which occurs in India, marked by roughening of the ton- gue, with fissures.
  • Agrypnia (ah-grip' -ne-ah) (d, priv.; unvog, sleep). Loss of sleep; insomnia.
  • Agrypnotic (ah-grip -not' -ik) (see Agrypnia). 1. Preventing sleep. 2. A medicine that prevents sleep.
  • Agurin (ag'-u-rin). A compound of sodium theobromate and sodium acetate; it is recom- mended as a diuretic in doses of 24 gr. (1.5 Gin.). Ahlfeld's Sign. Irregular tetanic contractions affecting localized areas of the uterus, ob- served after the third month of pregnancy.
  • Ail (dl) (ME., eyle). 1. To be out of health. 2. A slight indisposition. 3. Garlic. A., Wetherbee, a popular name for progressive muscular atrophy, from the fact that sev- eral successive generations of a Massachu- setts family of that name were affected with the disease.
  • Ailanthus (a-el-an'-thus). See Ailantus.
  • Ailurophobia (a-lu-ro-fo'-be-ah) (aUoupoc, a cat; 0o/?of, fear). A morbid fear of cats.
  • Akanthion (a-kan'-the-on). See Acanthion.
  • Akatamathesia (ah-kat-am-ath-e' -ze-ah) (d, priv.; Kazafxad-qacc, understanding). Inabil- ity to understand.
  • Akathisia (ah-kath-e' -ze-ah) (a, priv.; Kad'c^cv, to be seated). A name given by Lad Has- kovec to a form of rhythmic chorea in which the patient is unable to remain seated; the affection resembles astasia-abasia.
  • Akinetic (ah-ki-nef -ik) (akinesia). Relating to or affected with akinesia.
  • Akouphone (ah'-koo-fon). See Aconphone.
  • Alangin, Alanginum (al-an'-jin, -urn). An amorphous principle from Alangium lamarkii, soluble in alcohol, in ether, and in chloro- form; it is used as a febrifuge and emetic.
  • Alantic (al-an'-tik) (Ger., Alant, elecampane). Pertaining to or derived from elecampane. A. Anhydrid, C 15 H 20 O 2 , a crystalline sub- stance derived from the root of elecampane, melting at 66° C.
  • Alantin (al-an' -tin) . Same as Inulin.
  • Alaris (al-a'-ris) (ala, a wing). Wing-shaped. See Alar.
  • Alate (a'-lat) (ala). Winged.
  • Alatus (al-a' -ties). 1. Winged. 2. An indi- vidual in whom there is a marked back- ward projection of the scapulas. Albaras, Albarras (Ar.). A skin disease char- acterized by the formation of white, shin- ing patches. Syn., White leprosy; Baras; B a.rras.
  • Albargin (al-bar' -jin) . A compound of silver (15 %) and gelatose (a transformation-product of glue). A yellow powder, freely soluble in water, used in treatment of gonorrhea in injec- tions of 0.2 % solution 4 or 5 times daily.
  • Albedo (al-be'-do) (L., "whiteness"). White- ness. A. retinae, retinal edema. A. unguis, the lunula of the nail. Albert's Disease. Achillodynia; inflammation of the retrocalcanean bursa, generally secon- dary to osteitis of the os calcis.
  • Albescent (al-bes'-ent) (albescere, to become white). Whitish.
  • Albicans (al' -be-kanz) (albicare, to grow white). 1. One of the corpora albicantia of the brain. 2. White; whitish.
  • Albino tic (al-bin-ot'-ik). Affected with albinism.
  • Albino (al-bi'-no) (Sp.). A person affected with albinism.
  • Albolene (al'-bo-len) (albus, white; oleum, oil). A hydrocarbon oil, colorless, tasteless, odor- less, used as an application to inflamed sur- faces.
  • Albugineous (al-bu-jin'-e-us). Whitish.
  • Albukalin (al-bu' -kal-in) , C 8 H 17 N 2 6 . A sub- stance found in leukemic blood.
  • Album inofibrin (al-bu-min-o-p - brin). A compound of albumin and fibrin.
  • Albumen (al-bu' -men) (albus). The white of an egg. See Albumin.
  • Albumimeter (al-bu-mim' -et-er) (albumin; fiir- pov, a measure). An instrument for the quan- titative estimation of albumin in urine.
  • Albuminate (al-bu' -min-dt). A compound of albumin and certain bases, as albuminate of iron.
  • Albuminid (al-bu' -min-id) . Acidalbumin; syn- tonin.
  • Albuminif erous (al-bu-min-if '-er-us) (albumin ; jerre, to bear). Yielding albumin. Albumimm.eter(al-bu-min-im' -et-er). See Albumimeter.
  • Albuminimetry (al-bu-min-im'-et-re). The quantitative estimation of the albumin in a liquid.
  • Albuminogenous (al-bu-min-oj' -en- us) (albumin; yzwav, to produce). Producing albumin.
  • Albuminoid " (al-bu' -min-oid) (albu- min; ddoc, likeness). 1. Resemb- ling albumin. Applied to certain compounds having many of the characteristics of albumin. 2. Any nitrogenous principle of the class of which normal albumin may be J_j regarded as the type. A. Disease. See Amyloid Degeneration.
  • Albuminometer (al - bu - min-om' -et- er). See Albumimeter.
  • Albuminone (al-bu' '-min-on) (albumin). A principle derived from certain albuminoids; it is soluble in alcohol and is not coagulable by heat.
  • Albuminorrhea (al-bu-min-or-e' -ah) (albumin; po'ca, a flow). Excessive discharge of albu- mins.
  • Albuminose (al-bu'-min -os) (albumin). 1. A product of the digestion of fibrin or of any albuminoid in very dilute hydrochloric acid; Albumi- meter. ALBUMINOUS ALCOHOL acidalbumin. 2. Albumose, or one of the products of the digestion of albumin by the gastric juice.
  • Albuminous (al-bu' -min-us) (albumin). Con- taining, or of the nature of, albumin.
  • Albuminuric (al-bu-min-u' -rik) (see Albumin- uria). Associated with, of the nature of, or affected by, albuminuria.
  • Albumoscope (al-bu' -mo-skdp) (albumin; oko- 7ze~cv, to examine). An appliance for de- termining the presence and amount of al- bumin in urine.
  • Alcarnose (al-kar'-noz). A nutrient prepara- tion containing maltose combined with al- bumoses.
  • Alchemy (al'-kem-e) (Ar., of doubtful deri- vation). The supposed art of the transmu- tation of metals (into gold) and of finding a remedy for all diseases. Alcock's Canal. A canal formed by the sepa- ration of the layers of the obturator fascia for the transmission of the pudic nerve and vessels.
  • Alcogel (al'-ko-jet). A jelly-like combination of alcohol and silicic acid.
  • Alcoholate (al' -ko-hol-at) . 1. A chemic com- pound, as a salt, into which an alcohol enters as a definite constituent. 2. A preparation made with alcohol.
  • Alcoholature (al-ko-hoV '-at-chur) (Fr., alcoola- ture). An alcoholic tincture. Alcoholic Radicle. The name applied to the hydrocarbon radicle that unites with hydro- gen and oxygen to form an alcohol.
  • Alcoholica (al-ko-hoV -ik-ah) . In pharmacy, alcoholic preparations. • Alcoholimeter (al-ko-hol-im'-et-er). See Alco- holometer.
  • Alcoholism (aV-ko-hol-izm). The morbid re- sults of excessive or prolonged use of alcoholic liquors. The term acute alcoholism has been used as a synonym for inebriety. The chronic form is associated with severe disturbances of the digestive and nervous systems.
  • Alcoholization (al-ko-hol-iz-a* '-shun). The art or process of alcoholizing; the state of being alcoholized; the product of the process of alcoholizing.
  • Alcoholize (aV -ko-hol-iz) . 1. To impregnate with alcohol. 2. To convert into an alco- hol.
  • Alcoholometer (al-ko-hol-om' '-et-er) (alcohol; ftirpov, a measure). A hydrometer or other instrument used in determining the percent- age of alcohol in any liquid.
  • Alcoholophilia (al-ko'-hol-o-fil'-e-ah) (alcohol; ocXi'cv, to love). The appetite for strong drink; a craving for intoxicants.
  • Alcometric (al-ko-met'-rik). Relating to the estimation of the amount of alcohol in a liquid.
  • Aldehydase (al-de-hi'-daz). An oxydase occur- ring in the liver, capable of oxidizing sal- icylic aldehyd to the corresponding acid and supposed to be closely concerned in the func- tions of that organ.
  • Aldin (al'-din) (see Aldehyd). An amorphous basic chemic substance, formed from an ammonia compound of aldehyd. Several al- dins are known.
  • Ale (al) (AS., ealu). An alcoholic beverage brewed from malt and hops. It contains from 3 to 7 % of alcohol. Alecithal iah-les' -ith-at) (a, priv.; XencQoc, yolk). A term applied to certain ovums having the food-yolk absent, or present only in very small quantity.
  • Aleipsis (al-ip'-sis) (aXeapcg, an anointing). Steatosis; fatty degeneration.
  • Alembic (al-em'-bik) (Ar., al, the; a/z/?^, a cup). A vessel used for distillation.
  • Alembroth (al-em' -broth) (origin unknown). An old name for a compound of the chlorids of ammonium and mercury. Its solution has been used as an antiseptic. Aleppo Boil, A. Button, A. Evil, A. Pustule, A. Ulcer. See Furunculus orientalis.
  • Alepton P (al-ep' -ton) . Colloidal ferroman- ganese peptonate. Alepton S. Colloidal ferromanganese saccha- rate.
  • Aleukemia (ah-lu-ke' -me-ah) (a, priv.; Xsukoc, white; alp.a, blood). Deficiency in the pro- portion of white cells in the blood.
  • Aleukocytosis (ah-lu-ko-si-to f -sis) (a, priv.; Xsukoc, white; kotoc, cell). A diminished or insufficient formation of leukocytes.
  • Aleurometer (al-u-rom! -et-er) (aleuron; jnerpov, a measure). An instrument used for the examination of crude gluten as to its power of distending under the influence of heat, as a means of judging of the value of a flour for bread-making.
  • Aleuron (al-u'-ron) (aXeopov, flour). 1. Wheat flour. 2. Small, round proteid particles found in seeds.
  • Aleuronat (al-u'-ro-nat) (aleuron). A vegetable albumin used as a substitute for bread in cases of diabetes.
  • Aleuroscope (al-u'-ro-skop). See Aleurometer. Alexander's Operation. A shortening of the uterine round ligaments through an inguinal incision, to cure retrodisplacement.
  • Alexin (al-eks'-in) (aXe£cc, help). A defensive proteid existing normally in the blood.
  • Alexipharmac, Alexipharmic (al-eks-e-far'- mak, -mik) (dXk^ecv, to repel; (fiapjiaKov. a poison). 1. A medicine neutralizing a poison. 2. Acting as an internal antidote.
  • Alexipharmacon (al-eks-e-jar'-mak-on) (see Alexipharmac). Any alexipharmac medi- cine. Alexiterium ial-eks-it-e' -re-um) See Alex- eterium.
  • Alexocyte (al-eks' '-o-sit) (aXk^eiv, to ward off; kotoc, a cell). Hankin's name for an am- phophil leukocyte.
  • Alga (al'-ga) (alga, a seaweed ;-*pl., algce). A sea- weed; one of a group of acotyledonous plants living mostly in the water.
  • Algaroth (al'-gar-oth). Antimony oxychlorid.
  • Algesia (al-je' '-ze-ah) (aXyrjocc, pain). 1. Pain; suffering. 2. Hyperesthesia as regards the sensation of pain; also neuralgia.
  • Algesthesis (al-jes-the' -sis) (aX^yoc, pain; a'ta- Otjgcc, feeling). The perception of pain; pain- ful disease.
  • Algid (al'-jid) (algidus, cold). Cold; chilly. A. Cholera, the cold stage of Asiatic cholera. A. Fever, a pernicious intermittent fever, with great coldness of the surface of the body. A. State, the cold stage of a dis- ease.
  • Algidism, Algidity (al'-jid-izm, al-jid'-it-e) (see Algid). A marked sense of coldness; chilliness. A., Progressive. See Sclerema neonatorum.
  • Algiomotor (al-je-o-mo' '-tor) (dXyoc, pain; movere, to move). Causing movements attended with pain.
  • Algogenic (al-go-jen' '-ik) (algos; yzwav, to ALGOLAGNIA 41 ALIMENTATION produce). i. Causing neuralgic pain. 2. (algidus, cold; yevvdv, to produce.) Lowering the body-temperature below the normal.
  • Algolagnia (al-go-lag'-ne-ah) (algos; Xayve'ca, venery). Sexual perversion in which pain en- joined or endured plays a part.
  • Algometer (al-gom' -et-er) (algos; fihpov, a meas- ure). An instrument for testing the sensibility of a part to pain.
  • Algor (al'-gor) (L.). A sense of chilliness or coldness. Alibert's Disease. Mycosis fun- goides. A.'s Keloid, true keloid.
  • Ali cyclic (al-i-si' -klik) (aXeccfxip, fat; kukXoc, a circle) . Pertaining to any hydroaromatic derivative having a ring-formation, carbocyclic, but approaching the aliphatic deriva- tives in chemic behavior. Syn., A liphatic-cyclic.
  • Alible (al'-i-bl) (alibilis, nutritive). Nutritive; absorbable and as- similable.
  • Alienatio (al-yen-a'-she-o). See Alienation. A. partis, gangrene.
  • Alienation (dl-yen-a'-sh un) (alienus, strange). Mental derangement.
  • Alienist (a/' -yen-ist) (see Alien- ation). One who treats mental diseases.
  • Aliform (al'-if-orm) (a la, wing; forma, shape). Wing-shaped. A. Process, the wing of the sphe- noid.
  • Alima (al-i'-mah) (aXqioc, without hunger). Alimentary substances.
  • Aliment (al'-im-ent) (alimentum, from alimentare, to nourish). Nourishment; food. A., Acces- sory, A., Adjective, a condiment. A., Substantive, a food with nutritive value as distinguished from a condiment.
  • Alimentary (al-im-en' -ta-re) (see Aliment). Nourishing. A. Bolus, the food after mastication and just prior to swallowing. A. Canal, A. Duct, A. System, A. Tract, A. Tube, the digestive tube, from the lips to the anus, with its accessory glands.
  • Aliphatic (al-e-fat'-ik) (aXec(f>ap, fat). Fatty. A. Acid. See Acid, Fatty. A.-cyclic. See Alicyclic.
  • Aliquot (al-i'-kwot) (aliquot, several). A part of a number or quantity which will measure it without a remainder, as 4 is an aliquot of 12.
  • Alisphenoid (al-is-fe' -noid) (ala, a wing; sphenoid). 1. Pertaining to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. 2. The bone that in adult life forms the main portion of the greater wing of the sphenoid.
  • Alius (al'-us) (L.). The great toe. A. pollex, the thumb.
  • Alizarimid (al-iz-ar' -im-id), C u H 7 N0 2 . A vio- let-red substance obtained from v flocculent precipitated alizarin by action of ammonia with heat; it becomes nearly black on dry- ing. Syn., Alizarein.
  • Alkadermic (al-ka-der'-mik) (alkali; dipp.a, skin). Pertaining to or containing an alka- loid used in subcutaneous injection.
  • Alkalescence (al-ka-les'-ens) (Ar., al-qaliy, soda- ash). Slight or commencing alkalinity.
  • Alkalescent (al-ka-les' '-ent) (see Alkalescence). Somewhat alkaline.
  • Alkalimeter (al-ka-lim' -et-er) (alkali; fxhpov, a .measure). An instrument for estimating the alkali in a substance.
  • Alkalimetry (al-ka-lim' -et-re) (see Alkalimeter). The measurement of the amount of an alkali in a substance.
  • Alkaline (al'-ka-lln) (alkali). Having the qual- ities of or pertaining to an alkali. A. Earths, the oxids of calcium, barium, strontium, and magnesium.
  • Alkalinity (al-ka-lin'-i-le) (alkali). The quality of being alkaline.
  • Alkalinuria (al-ka-lin-u' -re-ah) (alkali; oupov, urine). Alkalinity of the urine.
  • Alkalithia (al-ka-lith'-e-ah). An effervescent preparation used in rheumatism, said to con- tain 1 gr. (0.065 Gm.) caffein, 5 gr. (0.32 Gm.) lithium bicarbonate, 10 gr. (0.65 Gm.) sodium bicarbonate, in each heaping tea- spoonful. Dose 1 heaped teaspoonful 3 times daily in a large glass of water.
  • Alkalization (al-ka-li-za'-shun) (alkali). The act of rendering a thing alkaline; the state or quality of being rendered alkaline.
  • Alkamin (al'-kam-in). See Alkine.
  • Alkanet (al'-kan-et) (Sp., dim. of alcana, henna). The root of the herb, Alkanna (Anchusa) tinctoria, yielding a red dye that is used in staining wood, coloring adulterated wines, and in pharmacy to give a red color to salves, etc.
  • Alkanin (al'-kan-in). See Alkannin. Alkanna-red. See Alkannin.
  • Alkannin (al'-kan-in) (see Alkanet). Alkanna- red; a valuable coloring-matter obtained from alkanet.
  • Alkapton (al-kap' -ton) . A yellowish, resinous, nitrogenous body occasionally found in urine.
  • Alkarsin (al-kar' -sin) (alcohol; arsenic). "Ca- det's fuming liquid"; an extremely poison- ous liquid containing cacodyl. It is of a brown color, and on exposure to the air ignites spontaneously.
  • Alkeins (aV '-ke-inz) . A collective name for the ethers formed from the alkines.
  • Alkine (al'-kin) . Any member of the acetylene series of hydrocarbons. Syn., Alkamin.
  • Alkyl (al'-kil) (alkali). The name applied to any of the univalent alcohol radicles, CnH^+i; methyl, ethyl, etc., are alkyls. A.-sulfids, thioethers; sulfur analogs of the ethers. They are colorless liquids, generally insoluble in water, and possessing a disagreeable odor resembling that of garlic.
  • Alkylation (al-kil-a' -shun) . The exchange of hydroxy lie hydrogen atoms for methyl groups.
  • Alkylen (al'-ki-len). See Olefin.
  • Allachesthesia (al-ah-kes-the' -ze-ah) (dXXax^, in another place; aZodyotc, sensation). Er- roneous localization of tactile impressions, differing from allocheiria in the respect that the sensation is felt on the same side of the body, but in a different place from that in which the irritation occurs.
  • Allantiasis (al-an-ti' -as-is) (dXX&c, a sausage). Sausage-poisoning, due to the ingestion of sausages in which putrefactive changes have taken place.
  • Allantoic (al - an - to' - ik) (dXXdg, a sausage; eldoc, resemblance). Pertaining to the al- lantois.
  • Allantoid (al-an' -toid) (see Allantoic). 1. Re- sembling a sausage. 2. Relating to the allan- tois. A. Liquid. See Liquor amnii spu- rius.
  • Allantoides (al-an-to-i'-dez). 1. Allantoid. 2. A sausage. 3. The great toe. 4. The al- lantois.
  • Allantoin (al-an' -to-in) (see Allantoic), C 4 H 6 - N 4 3 . A crystalline substance occurring in traces in normal urine, and prepared from uric acid by oxidation. Also the characteristic constituent of the allantoic fluid, and likewise found in fetal urine and amniotic fluid.
  • Allantois (al-an' -to-is) (see Allantoic). One of the fetal membranes derived from the meso- blastic and hypoblastic layers. Its function is to convey the blood-vessels to the chorion. The lower part finally becomes the bladder, the upper, the urachus.
  • Allantotoxicon (al-an-to-toks' -ik-on) (dXXac, a sausage; to^ckov, a poison). A poisonous substance, probably a ptomain, that develops during the putrefactive fermentation of sau- sage.
  • Allen's (Charles W.) Iodin Test. See under Tinea versicolor. Allen's Reaction for Phenol. Add to one or two drops of the liquid to be tested a few drops of hydrochloric acid and then one drop of nitric acid. A cherry-red coloration is produced.
  • Allene (al-en'), CH 2 =C=CH 2 . An isomer of allylene. Syn., fi-Allylene; Isoallylene.
  • Allesthesia (al-es-the' -ze-ah) (aXXoc, other; a'iad-qocc, feeling). Synonym of Allocheiria.
  • Alleviator (al-e' -ve-a-tor) (allevare, to lighten). A device for raising or lifting a sick person from the bed.
  • Alliaceous (al-e-a'-shus) (allium, garlic). Resembling garlic, or pertaining to the same. Allingham's Painful Ulcer. Anal fissure. Allis' Sign. Relaxation of the fascia lata be- tween the iliac crest and the trochanter major is indicative of fracture of the neck of the femur.
  • Alliteration (al-it-er-a'-shun) (ad, to; liter a, letter). A form of dysphrasia in which the patient arranges his words according to the sound.
  • Allochesthesia (al-ok-es-the' -ze-ah) . Same as Allocheiria.
  • Allochroism (al-ok'-ro-izm) (aXXof, other; XP^- (ia, color). 1 . Variation in color. 2. A change of color.
  • Allogotrophia (al-o-go-tro' -je-ah) (alios; xpkfatv, to nourish). The nourishment of one part ALLOLALIA 44 ALLYL of the body at the expense of some other part.
  • Allolalia (al-o-la' -le-ah) (alios; XaXe7v,to speak). Any perversion of the faculty of speech. See Alalia.
  • Allorrhythmia (al-or-rith' '-me-ah) (alios; pod- p.bc, rhythm). Variation in intervals of the pulse.
  • Allotherm (aV -o-therm) (alios; dip/mrj, heat). An organism whose temperature is directly dependent on its culture-medium.
  • Allotoxin (al-o-toks' -in) (alios; to^ckov, poison). Any substance, produced by tissue-metamor- phosis within the organism, that tends to shield the body by destroying microorganisms or toxins that are inimical to it.
  • Allotriodontia (al-ot-re-o-dori-she-ah) (dXXb- rpcoc, strange; odoug, tooth), i. The trans- planting of teeth from one person to another. 2. The existence of teeth in abnormal situa- tions, as in tumors.
  • Allotriogeustia (al-ot-re-o-gus' -te-ah) (allotrios; yeuocg, taste). Perversion of the sense of taste; abnormity of the appetite.
  • Allotriophagy (al-ot-re-oft'-a-je) (allotrios; (frayew, to eat). Depraved or unnatural appetite.
  • Allotropic (al-o-trop'-ik) (aXXoc, other; rpoTzog, turn), i. Characterized by allotropism. 2. Relating to or marked by isomerism.
  • Alloxamid (al-oks' -am-id) (alloxan; ammonia). A substance, C 8 H 4 N 4 4 , obtained from al- loxan by the action of ammonia.
  • Alloxan (al-oks'-an) (allantoin; oxalic), C 4 H 2 - N 2 4 . A crystalline substance produced by the oxidation of uric acid.
  • Alloxantin (al-oks-an'-tin) (alloxan), C 8 H 4 N 4 7 + 3H 2 0. A substance obtained by reducing alloxan with SnCl 2 , zinc, and HC1, or H 2 S in the cold. It occurs in small, hard, color- less prisms that turn red when treated with ammonia.
  • Alloxin (al-oks' -in) (allantoin). Any of a series of xanthin bases, the result of the splitting- up of chromatin, and which on oxidation produce uric acid.
  • Alloxur, Alloxuric (al-oks'-ur, al-oks-u'-rik) (aXXoc, other; o$uc, sharp). A term applied by Kossel and Kriiger to the xanthin bases, from the fact that these, like uric acid, contain all- oxan and urea groups. A. Bases, A. Bodies, xanthin, hypoxanthin, guanin, paraxanthin, adenin.
  • Alloxuremia (al-oks-u-re' -me-ah) (alloxur; ure- mia). Toxemia due to the resorption of the xanthin or alloxur bases. Alloxuria ial-oks-u' -re-ah) (alloxur; ohpov, urine). The pathologic secretion of alloxur bodies (uric acid, xanthin, hypoxanthin, paraxanthin, adenin, carnin, etc.) in the urine.
  • Alloy (al-oi') (from the French aloi, a contrac- tion of a la lot). 1 . A compound of two or more metals by fusion. 2. The least valuable of two or more metals that are fused together.
  • Allspice (awl'-spls). The fruit of Eugenia pi- menta. A., Carolina, the leaves of Caly can- thus -floridus, having the properties of an aro- matic stimulant. See Pimenta.
  • Allylamin (al-il'-am-iri) (allium; ammonia), NH 2 (C :i H 5 ). Ammonia in which a hydrogen atom is replaced by allyl. It is a caustic liquid.
  • Alochia (ah-lo r -ke-ah) (d, priv.; Xoxca, the lochia). Absence of the lochia.
  • Aloe (al'-o). A genus of liliaceous plants. See Aloes. A, americana. See Agave. A,- resin, an amorphous resinous constituent of aloes obtained as a deposit from a hot aque- ous solution of aloes on cooling.
  • Aloeretin (al-o-e-re'-tin). See Aloe-resin.
  • Aloetic (al-o-ef '-ik) (aloes). Containing or per- taining to aloes.
  • Aloetin (al-o-e'-tin). 1. Aloe-resin. 2. A yellow, crystalline principle obtainable from aloes.
  • Aloin (al'-o-in) (aloes). A bitter principle found in aloes. It forms fine needles, pos- sesses a very bitter taste, and acts as a strong purgative. Several glucosids of this name ALOPECIA 46 ALTERNATE are described, as, barbaloin, nataloin, zan- aloin, socaloin. Dose J-2 gr. (0.032-0.13 Gm.).
  • Aloxanthin (al-oks-an f -thin), Ci 5 H 10 O 6 . A yel- low substance obtained from barbaloin and socaloin by the action of potassium dichro- mate.
  • Alpenstich (alp'-en-stik) (Ger.). A form of severe pleurisy or pleuropneumonia with ty- phoid symptoms peculiar to mountainous regions. It occurred as an epidemic in the Swiss Alps in 1771 and in North Germany in 1832.
  • Alphenols (al' -fe-nolz) . A class of compounds having the characteristics of both alcohols and phenols.
  • Alphodeopsoriasis (al-fo-de-o-so-ri 1 '-a-sis) (dX- cooTjc, leprous; copiaoc<;, psoriasis). A form of psoriasis resembling leprosy.
  • Alphodermia (al-fo-der' -me-ah) (dX6c, vitiligo). 1. An old name for leprosy. 2. Psoriasis.
  • Alphosis (al-fo'-sis) (see Alphos). Albinism; leukoderma.
  • Alpinia (al-pin' -e-ah) (Alpinus, an Italian botanist of the sixteenth century). A genus of zingiberaceous tropical plants. A. chin- ensis, A. officinarum, and other species fur- nish galangal.
  • Alstonidin (al-ston f - id - in) . An amorphous substance contained in a variety of dita-bark.
  • Alstonin (al-sto' -nin) . 1. An amorphous sub- stance contained in a variety of dita-bark. 2. A crystalline alkaloid, C 21 H 20 N 2 O 4 , obtained from Alstonia conslricta.
  • Alter (awl'-ter). To castrate or spay.
  • Alterant (awl'-ter -ant). Same as Alterative.
  • Alternate (awl'-ter-ndt) (altemare f to do by ALTERNATING 47 ALUMINIUM turns). Occurring successively in space or time. A. Hemiplegia. See Hemiplegia.
  • Alternating (awV -ter-na-ting) (see Alternate). Occurring successively. A. Currents, electric currents the direction of which is constantly changing. A. Insanity, a form of insanity in which there are regular cycles of exaltation and depression.
  • Alternation (awl-ter-na' -shun) (see Alternate). Repeated transition from one state to another. Alternator iawV-ter-na-tor). An apparatus for converting the direct dynamo current into an alternating current.
  • Althaus' Oil. An oil made as follows: Metallic mercury, i part; pure lanolin, 4 parts; 2 % phenol, 5 parts. It is used in the treatment of syphilis in injections of 5 min. (0.3 Cc.) at a dose.
  • Althea, Althaea (al-the'-ah) (L.). Marshmal- low. The peeled root of Althcea officinalis, a plant of the mallow family. It consists of about one -third of vegetable mucus and starch, together with the alkaloids asparagin and althein (latterly regarded as identical).
  • Altitude (al'-ti-tud) (altitudo, height). The ele- vation of a place above the sea-level. Altmann's Granules. Round bodies staining readily with carbolfuchsin, and regarded as cell-derivatives which have grown through the assimilation of fat. They are probably allied to Russell's bodies.
  • Alumen (al-u'-men) (L., gen., aluminis). See Alum. A. exsiccatum (U. S. P.), burnt or dehydrated alum. See Alum, Burnt.
  • Alumil (al'-u-mil). Alumina in combination with acids.
  • Alumina (al-u' -min-ah) (L.), A1 2 3 . Alumin- ium oxid; the principal ingredient of clay and of many stones, earths, and minerals.
  • Aluminate (al-u'-min-dt) (alumina). A basic salt of alumina. Aluminated Copper. See Lapis divinus.
  • Aluminic, Aluminicus (al-u-min'-ik, -us). Relating to or having the nature of alum.
  • Aluminiferous (al-u-min-if '-er-us) (alum; ferre, to bear). Yielding alum.
  • Alumroot. The root of Heuchera ameri- cana. Its properties are due to gallic and tannic acids. It is very astringent. Dose of the fluidextract 10-20 min. (0.65-1.3 Cc). Also the root of Geranium maculatum, a mild astringent.
  • Alveated (al'-ve-a-ted) (alveatus, hollowed out like a trough). Honeycombed; channeled; vaulted like a beehive. Alvegniat's Pump. A mercurial air-pump used in estimating the gaseous constituents of the blood.
  • Alveola (al-ve' -o-lah) (alveolus, a small hollow). A little depression.
  • Alveolitis (al-ve-o-W -tis) (alveolus; ncc, in- flammation). Inflammation of the alveolus of a tooth.
  • Alveolodental (al-ve' ' -o-lo-den-tal) (alveolus; dens, a tooth). Pertaining to the teeth and their sockets.
  • Alveolomaxillary (al-ve' -o-lo-maks-il-a-re) . The buccinator muscle.
  • Alvine (al'-vin or al'-vln) (alvus, belly). Per- taining to the belly. A. Concretion, an in- testinal calculus. A. Dejections, A. Dis- charges, the feces. A. Obstruction, con- stipation.
  • Alvus (al'-vus) (L., pi. and gen., alvi). 1. The belly or its contained viscera. 2. Diarrhea. A. adstricta, A. astricta, an extreme degree of constipation. A. dura, constipation. A. renis, the pelvis of the kidney.
  • Alympnia (ah-lim' -e-ah) (a, priv.; lympha, lymph). A deficiency of lymph.
  • Alyssus (al-is'-us) (a, priv.; XOooa, madness). Preventing or curing rabies.
  • Ama (ah' -ma) (a pur), a water-pail). An enlarge- ment at the end opposite the ampulla of a AMACRINE 49 AMBLYOPIA bony canal of the labyrinth of the internal ear.
  • Amacrine (am'-ak-ren) (d, priv.; fxanpoc, long; 7c, a fiber). Applied to nerve-cells entirely devoid of axis-cylinder processes.
  • Amadou (am'-a-doo) (Fr., amadouer, to coax). German tinder or touchwood; Boletus igni- arius, a fungus found on old tree-trunks, used to stanch local hemorrhage and as a dressing for wounds, etc. A. de Panama, a hemostatic prepared from the leaf-hairs of Micronia mucronata.
  • Amalgamation (am-al-gam-a'-shun) (see Amal- gam). In metallurgy, the process of com- bining mercury with some other metal, as practised in separating silver and gold from ores.
  • Amanitin (am-an'-it-in) (duavl-ac, a kind of fungi). 1. A principle identical with cho- lin, obtained from the fly-agaric. 2. A poi- sonous glucosid obtainable from various spe- cies of agaric.
  • Amara (am-a'-ra) (amarus, bitter). 1. Bitters. 2. The bitter alkaloids. 3. (d/iapa, a trench.) A sewer, drain, or stream. In the plural, amarce, the hollows of the outer ear.
  • Amaril (am'-ar-il) (Sp., amarillo, yellow). The poison induced by Bacillus icteroides.
  • Amarin (am'-ar-in) (see Amara), C 21 H l8 N 2 , tri- phenyldihydroglyoxalin. It results from boil- ing hydrobenzamid with caustic potash. It has a poisonous effect on animals.
  • Amaroids (am'-ah-roids). All distinctly bitter vegetable extractives of definite chemic com- position other than alkaloids and glucosids.
  • Amarylism (am' -ar-il-izm) (see Amaril). Yel- low fever.
  • Amasesis (ah-mas-e'-sis) (a, priv.; p.aoT)acc, chewing). Inability to chew.
  • Amastia (ah-mas' -ti-ah) (a, priv.; fiaoxbc, breast). Absence of the mammas or nipples.
  • Amativeness (am'-at-iv-nes) (amare, to love). The sexual passion.
  • Amaurotic (am-au-rot'-ik) (see Amaurosis). Relating to or affected with amaurosis. A. Cat's-eye, a light-reflex through the pupil in suppurative choroiditis.
  • Amazia (ah-ma'-ze-ah) (d, priv.; f.ia£oc, the breast). Absence of the mammary gland.
  • Amber (am'-ber). See Succinum.
  • Ambidexter (am-bi-deks'-ier) (ambo, both; dexter, the right hand). An ambidextrous person.
  • Ambidextrous (am-bi-deks'-trus) (see Ambi- dexter). Able to use both hands equally well.
  • Ambiopia (am-bi-o'-pe-ah). See Diplopia.
  • Ambitus (am'-bit-us) (ambire, to surround). A circumference. A. cerebelli, Burdach's term for the cerebellum, pons, and oblongata taken together.
  • Amblotic (am-blot' -ik) (dfL^XajxcKdc). Abortifac- ient.
  • Amboceptoid (am-bo-sep'-toid). A degener- ated amboceptor which has lost its binding group (haptophore) on the one hand for the cell, or, on the other hand, for the com- plement.
  • Ambulance (am' -bu-lans) (ambidare, to walk about). In Europe the term is applied to the surgical staff and arrangements of an army in service. In the United States the word is restricted to a vehicle for the trans- ference of the sick or wounded from one place to another.
  • Ambustion (am-bus'-chun) (ambustio, a barn). A burn or scald.
  • Amebic (am-e'-bik) (see Ameba). Pertaining to or characterized by amebas. A. Dysen- tery, dysentery associated with the presence in the bowel of Amceba coli.
  • Amebism, Amoebism, Amebaism, Amoeba- ism (am'-e-bizm, am-e'-ba-izm) . A pathologic condition due to the invasion of the system by amebas.
  • Ameboid (am-e'-boid) (ameba; sldoc, resem- blance). Resembling an ameba in form or in movement, as the white blood-cells.
  • Amebula, Amcebula (am-e'-bu-lah). E. Ray Lankester's name for the amebiform parasite which develops from the exotospore of the malaria parasite.
  • Ameburia (am-e-bu' -re-ah) . The occurrence of amebas in the urine.
  • Amelia (ah-me'-le-ah) (a, priv.; pkXoe, limb). Absence of the limbs.
  • Amelioration (am-el-yo-ra'-shun) (ad, to; melior, better). Improvement.
  • Ameloblast (am-eV -o-blast) (Anglo - French, amel, enamel; (IXaoxbc, a germ) An en- amel-cell, one of the cylindric cells cover- ing the papilla of the enamel organ of the teeth, and forming a beautifully regular epi- thelial layer that produces the enamel.
  • Amelus (am'-el-us) (a, priv.; piXoc, limb). A monstrosity without limbs. Amenia iah-me' -ne-ah) . See Amenorrhea.
  • Amenorrheal (ah-men-or-e'-al) (see Amenor- rhea). Pertaining to amenorrhea.
  • Amentia (ah-men' -she-ah) (a, priv.; mens, mind). Defective intellect; idiocy.
  • Ameristic (ah-mer-is'-tik) (a, priv.; pipoc, a part). Not segmented.
  • Amesiality (ah-me-ze-al' -it-e) . The throwing of a part, as the pelvis, to one side of the mesial line of the figure.
  • Ametria (ah-mei' -re-ah) (a, priv.; prjrpa, AMETROMETER 51 AMMONIA womb), i. Absence of the uterus. 2. (d, priv.; (jthpov, a measure.) Immoderation; asymmetry.
  • Ametrometer (ah-met-rom'-et-er) (a, priv.; pkxpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring ametropia.
  • Ametropia (ah-met-ro' -pe-ah) (a, priv.; (ikrpov, a measure; o(, both; apuuc, net; xpaj(xa, color). A term applied by Nissl to a nerve-cell the stainable portion of whose cell-body is in the form of a pale network, the nodal points of which are joined by an intensely staining network.
  • Amphibia (am-fib'-e-ah) (am phi-; p'coc, life). A class of the Vertebrata, living both in the water and upon the land, as the frog, newt, etc.
  • Amphibious (am-fib'-e-us) (see Amphibia). Living both on land and in water.
  • Amphiblastic (am-fe-blas'-iik) (am phi-; ftXaozoc, a germ). Pertaining to that form of complete segmentation that gives rise to an amphi- blastula.
  • Amphibolic (aw- fe-bol'-ik) (see Amphib olia). Uncertain; doubtful. Ap- plied to a pe- riod in the fe- brile process occurring between the fastigium and the defervescence, and marked by exa- cerbations and remissions.
  • Amphicrania (am-fe-kra'-ne-ah) (amphi-; upav- cov, the skull). Headache affecting both sides of the head.
  • Amphicreatin (am-Je-kre' -at-in) (amphi-; Kpkag, flesh), C 7 H 19 X 7 4 . One of the muscle-leu- komains. It crystallizes in brilliant oblique prisms of a yellowish-white color, and is faintly basic.
  • Amphicreatinin (am-fe-kre-at r -in-in) (see Am- phicreatin), C 9 H 10 X 7 Oj,. A member of the creatinin group of leukomains derived from muscle.
  • Amphicroic (am-Je-kro'-ik) (amphi-; npouecv, to test). Having the power to turn blue litmus- paper red and red litmus-paper blue.
  • Amphidiarthrosis (am-je-di-ar-thro' -sis) (am- phi-; dcapdpojocc, articulation). The articu- lation of the lower jaw, as it partakes of the nature both of ginglymus and of arth- rodia.
  • Amphigony (am-fig'-o-ne) (amphi-; ybvoc, off- spring). The sexual process in its broadest sense; gamogenesis.
  • Amphimicrobian (am-fe-mi-hro'-be-an) (am- phi-; ptiKpof, small; ficoc, life). Both aero- bian and anaerobian.
  • Amphimixis (am-fi-miks' -is) (amphi-; /*Jc.'f, mixing). The mingling of two individuals or their germs; sexual reproduction.
  • Amphimorula (am -e- mor'- u - lah) (amphi-; morula, a mulberry). The morula, or globu- lar mass of cleavage cells resulting from un- equal segmentation, the cells of the hemi- spheres being unlike in size.
  • Amphistoma (am-fis'-to-mah) (amphi-; arbp.a, mouth). A genus of trematode worms, named from the mouth-like apparatus at either end. One species, A. hominis, has been found in the large intestine of man.
  • Amphitrichous (am-fit'-rik-us) (amphi-; dp'cq, a hair). Applied to the type of flagellation in bacteria in which there is a single flagellum at each pole.
  • Amphodiplopia (am-o-dip-lo'-pe-ah) (dp.(jiio, both; oc-Aooc, double; axp, eye). Double vision affecting each of the eyes.
  • Amphophil, Amphophilous (am'-fo-fil, am- fof'-il-us) (afx, both; r), nourishment). Atrophy of the spinal cord.
  • Amphtblastula. — (A Her Balfour.) a. Granular cells which will form the epibla=t. b. Ciliated cells which become invaginated to form the hypoblast.
  • Amyelus (ah-mi' -el-us) (d, priv.; jiueAoc, marrow). A fetal monstrosity with partial or complete absence of the spinal cord.
  • Amygdalae amarae, Oleum (U. S. P.), con- tains 3-14 % of hydrocyanic acid and has similar uses. Dose \-i min. (0.016-0.065 Cc). Amygdalae amarae, Spiritus (U. S.
  • Amygdalectomy (am-ig-dal-ek' -to-me) (amyg- dala; iKTOfir), a cutting-out). Excision of a tonsil.
  • Amygdalin (am-ig' -dal-in) (see Amygdala), QqH^NOh + 3H 2 0. A glucosid formed in bitter almonds, in various plants, and in the leaves of the cherry-laurel. Under the influence of emulsin, contained in the almond, it splits up into glucose and hydro- cyanic acid.
  • Amygdalitis (am-ig-dal-i' '-lis) (amygdala; tree, inflammation). Tonsillitis.
  • Amygdalolith (am-ig-daV -o-liih) (amygdala; A'tdoc, a stone). A concretion or calculus found in the tonsil.
  • Amygdalopathy (am-ig-dal-op' -ath-e) (amyg- dala; Tiddoc, a disease). Any disease of the tonsils.
  • Amygdalotome (am-ig' -dal-o-tom) (amygdala; ripvecv, to cut). An instrument used in cut- ting the tonsils.
  • Amygdalotomy (am-ig-dal-of -o-me) (see Amyg- dalotome). Tonsillotomy.
  • Amygdophenin (am-ig-do' -en-in), C 6 H 4 (OC 2 - H 5 )NH . OC . CH(OH)C 6 H 5 gray ish- white, crystalline powder, derived from par- amidophenol. It is antirheumatic. Dose 15 gr. (1 Gm.) from 1 to 6 times daily in pow- der. Syn., Phenyl ' glycol phenetidin.
  • Amylaceous (am-il-a' -se-us) (see Amyl). Con- taining starch; starch-like.
  • Amylamin (am-iV -am-hi) . See Isoamylamin. A. Hydrochlorate, C 5 H 14 NC1, a reaction- product of amyl cyanate, potassium hydrate, and hydrochloric acid, occurring as deliques- cent scales or crystals. It is an antipyretic. Dose 7-15 gr. (0.45-1.0 Gm.).
  • Amylate (am'-il-at). 1. A combination formed by the replacement of the hydrogen of the hydroxyl molecule in amylic alcohol with a metal or basic radicle. 2. A compound of starch with a radicle.
  • Amyli, Glyceritum (U.S. P.), contains starch, 10; water, 10; glycerol, 80%; used for external application. A. iodatum, contains starch, 95 %; iodin, 5 % ; triturated with distilled water and dried. Dose 1 dr.-J oz. (4-16 Gm.).
  • Amyli, Mucilago (B. P.), used in making enemas.
  • Amylic (am-il'-ik) (see Amyl). Pertaining to amyl. A. Alcohol, fusel oil; potato- starch alcohol; amyl hydrate. An alcohol having the composition C b H 12 0, produced in the continued distillation of fermented grain. It was formerly used to adulterate whisky. It is a solvent and reagent.
  • Amylin (am'-il-in) (see Amyl). The insoluble wall of the starch-grain.
  • Amyloforrn (am-il'-o-form). An odorless white powder produced by the chemic combina- tion of starch with formaldehyd. It is non- toxic, quite insoluble, and is not decom- posed under 180 C. It is recommended as a surgical antiseptic.
  • Amylogenic (am-il-o-jen' -ik) (amylon; yewdv, to produce). Starch-producing.
  • Amylolysis (am-il-ol'-is-is) (amylon; \uoic, so- lution). The digestion of starch, or its con- version into sugar.
  • Amylolytic (am-il-o-lit'-ik) (see Amylolysis). Pertaining to or effecting the digestion of starch, as the ferments in the saliva and pancreatic juice that convert starch into sugar.
  • Amylon (am'-il-on) (L.). 1. Starch. 2. Gly- cogen. 3. A principle found in grape-juice.
  • Amylophosphin (am-il-o-fos'-fin). A phosphin in which the hydrogen is replaced by amyl.
  • Amylose (am'-il-os) (amylon). Any one of the group of carbohydrates, comprising starch, glycogen, dextrin, inulin, gum, cellulose, and tunicin.
  • Amylum (am'-il-um) (L.), C 6 H 10 O 5 . Starch.
  • Amyocardia (am-i-o-kar'-de-ah) (a, priv.; jiuc, muscle; napoca, the heart). Lack of mus- cular power in the heart's contractions.
  • Amyostasia (am-i-os-ta'-ze-ah) (a, priv.; hoc, muscle; ozaocc, standing). An abnormal trembling of the muscles while in use, often seen in locomotor ataxia.
  • Amyosthenia (am-i-os-the'-ne-ah) (a, priv.; {.toe, muscle; odkvoc, force). Deficient mus- cular power.
  • Amyotrophia (am-i-o-tro' -je-ah) (a, priv.; fiuc, muscle; rpou$tv, to grow). 1. A monstrosity formed by the fusion of two male fetuses. 2. The growing together of the male geni- talia.
  • Anesthetization (an-es-thet-iz-a' -shun) \av- o.'codi)Tog, insensible). The act of placing un- der the influence of an anesthetic.
  • Anesthetize (an-es' -thet-iz) (see Anesthetiza- tion). To put under the influence of an an- esthetic.
  • Anesthetizer (an-es 1 ' -thet-i-zer) (see Anestheti- zation). One who administers an anesthetic.
  • Anesthyl (an-es' -thiV) . A local anesthetic said to consist of ethyl chlorid, 5 parts; methyl chlorid, 1 part.
  • Anetodermia (an-et-o-der' -me-ah) (dverSc, re- laxed; okpjia, skin). Relaxation of the skin.
  • Aneuria (ah-nu'-re-ah) (a, priv.; veupov, a nerve). Lack of nervous power.
  • Aneuric (ah-nu'-rik) (see Aneuria). Character- ized by aneuria.
  • Aneurysmal (an-u-riz' -mat) (see Aneurysm). Of the nature of or pertaining to an aneu- rysm. A. Varix. See under Aneurysm, Ar- teriovenous.
  • Anex (an'-eks). An abbreviation of anode ex- citation.
  • Angeio- (an-je-o-). See Angio-.
  • Angel's Wing (dn'-jelz wing). A deformity of the scapula in which it turns forward and then backward, giving the shoulder a peculiar dorsal bulge.
  • Angelica (an-jeV -ik-ah) (L.). The seeds and root of Angelica archangelica. It is an aro- matic stimulant and emmenagog. Dose of the seeds or roots 30 gr.-i dr. (2-4 Gm.).
  • Angi (an'-je). Inguinal buboes.
  • Angiectasis (an-ji-ek' -tas-is) (ayje'cov, a vessel; eKzaacg, dilation). Abnormal dilation of a vessel.
  • Angiitis, Angeitis (an-je-V -tis) (ajyelov, a vessel; ncc, inflammation). Inflammation of a lymph-vessel or of a blood-vessel.
  • Anginoid (an' -jin-oid) (see Angina). Resemb- ling angina.
  • Anginose (an'-jin-os) (see Angina). Pertain- ing to angina; characterized by symptoms of suffocation.
  • Angio thlipsis (an-je-o-thlip'-sis) (angio-; Ol't- fteev, to rub; to gall). The abrasion of a ves- sel.
  • Angio tribe (an'-je-o-trib) (angio-; rpCjSsiv, to grind or bruise). A clamp furnished with powerful jaws used by Turner to occlude arteries in vaginal hysterectomy.
  • Angio- (an-je-o-). A prefix signifying relating to a vessel.
  • Angioataxia (an -je-o-at- aks'-e - ah) (angio-; axa^ca, want of order). An irregularity in the tension of the blood-vessels.
  • Angioblast (an' -je-o-blast) (angio-, fiXaozoc-, a germ). An embryonic cell developing into vascular tissue.
  • Angiocardiokinetic (an-je-o-kar-de-o-kin-el'-ik) (angio-; napoca, heart; ntveiv, to move). 1. Stimulating or affecting the action or move- ments of the heart and blood-vessels. 2. A drug which stimulates or affects the move- ments of the heart and blood-vessels.
  • Angiocavernous (an-je-o -kav'-er-nus). Relat- ing to cavernous angioma. Angioceratodeitis. See Angiokeratoditis.
  • Angiocheiloscope (an-je-o-ki'-lo-skop) (angio-; Xettof, a lip; okotceIv, to look). An instru- ment by means of which the blood-circulation ANGIOCHOLITIS 67 ANGIOPLEROSIS in the capillaries of the mucosa of the lips is magnified for observation.
  • Angiocholitis (an-je-o-ko-W -tis) (angio-; x°tf> bile; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of the biliary ducts.
  • Angioderma pigmentosum (an-je-o-der' -mah pig-men-to' -sum) . See Atrophoderma.
  • Angiofibroma (an-je-o- fi-bro f -mah). A fibrous degenerating angioma.
  • Angiogenesis, Angiogeny (an-je-o-jen'-es-is, an-je-og'-en-e) (angio-; yevvdv, to produce). The development of the vessels.
  • Angioglioma (an-je-o-gli-o' -mah) (angio-; gli- oma). A glioma rich in blood-vessels.
  • Angiograph (an' -je-o-graf) (angio-; ypdejieev, to write). A variety of sphygmograph.
  • Angiography (an-je-o g f -ra-fe) (see Angiograph). A description of the vessels; angiology.
  • Angiokeratoditis (an - je-o - ker -at-o-di' ' - tis) (angio-; nkpac, cornea; exec, inflammation). Vascular keratitis.
  • Angiokinesis (an-je-o-kin-e' -sis) (angio-; kcvs'cv, to move). Excitation or action of the blood- vessels.
  • Angioleucitis (an-je-o-lu-si' '-tis) (angio-; Xeunoc, white; neg, inflammation). Inflammation of the lymphatic vessels.
  • Angioleukasia (an-je-o-lu-ka' '-zhe-ah) (angio-; hunog, white; luzaocc, dilation). Dilation of the lymphatics.
  • Angiolithic (an-je-o -lith' -ik) (angio-; a Woe, a stone). A term applied to neoplasms in which crystalline or mineral deposits take place, with hyaline degeneration of the coats of the vessels.
  • Angiology (an-je-oV -o-je) (angio-; Xoyoc, sci- ence). The science of the blood-vessels and lymphatics.
  • Angiolymphitis (an-je-o-limf-i'-tis). Same as Angioleucitis.
  • Angiolymphoma (an-je-o-limf-o' '-mah) (angio-; lympha, lymph; ofxa, tumor). A tumor formed of lymphatic vessels.
  • Angiomalacia (an-je-o-mal-a' -she-ah) (angio-; (laXan'ca, a softening). Softening of the blood- vessels.
  • Angiometer (an-je-om' '-et-er) . See Sphygmo- graph.
  • Angiomyces (an-je-o-mi'-sez) (angio^; (lOK-qc, a fungus; an excrescence). A fungoid or spongy dilation of the capillaries.
  • Angiomyocardiac (an-je-o-mi-o-kar' -de-ak) (an- gio-; fide, muscle; napd'ca, the heart). Per- taining to the muscles of the vessels of the heart.
  • Angiomyopathy (an-je-o-mi-op' -a-ihe) (angio-; p,uc, muscle; noBoc, disease). Any affection of the vessels involving the musculature.
  • Angiomyosarcoma (an-je-o-mi-o-sar-ko'-mah) . A tumor containing elements of angioma, myoma, and sarcoma.
  • Angioneurectomy (an-je-o-nu-rek' -to-me) (an- gio-; veupov, nerve; e/cro/^, excision). Resec- tion of all the cord-elements of the prostate except the vas, with its artery and vein.
  • Angioneuroedema (an-je-o-nu-ro-e-de' -mah) . See Angioneurotic Edema.
  • Angioneurosis (an-je-o-nu-ro' -sis) (angio-; neu- rosis). A neurosis of the blood-vessels; a disturbance of the vasomotor system, either of the nature of a spasm of the blood- vessels (angiospasm) or of paralysis (angio- paralysis).
  • Angiopancreatitis (an-je-o-pan-kre-at-i' -tis) . Inflammation of the vascular tissue of the pancreas.
  • Angioparalysis (an-je-o-par-aV '-is-is) (angio-; xapaXuocc, paralysis). Vasomotor paralysis.
  • Angioparalytic (an-je-o-par-al-if -ik) (see An- gioparalysis). Relating to or characterized by angioparalysis.
  • Angioparesis (an-je-o-par' '-es-is) (angio-; %dpt- occ, paresis). Partial paralysis of the vaso- motor apparatus.
  • Angiopathy (an-je-op'-a-the) (angio-; nadoc, disease). Any disease of the vascular sys- tem.
  • Angiophorous (an-je-o J'-or-us) (angio-; (fropstv, to bear). Applied to tissue which accom- panies and supports vessels.
  • Angioplerosis (an -je-o- pier - o'- sis) (angio-; ANGIOPRESSURE 68 ANGLE nXripu)acc, a filling-up). Engorgement of the vessels.
  • Angiopressure (an-je-o-presh'-ur). The pro- duction of hemostasis by means of angio- tribe and forceps without ligation.
  • Angiorhigosis (an-je-o-ri-go'-sis) (angio-; p'c-fog, cold). Rigidity of the vessels.
  • Angiorrhexis (an-je-or-eks'-is) (angio-; pr)£cc, a bursting). Rupture of a blood-vessel.
  • Angiosarcoma (an-je-o-sar-ko'-mah) (angio-; oap$, flesh; o/ia, a tumor). A vascular sar- coma.
  • Angiosclerosis (an-je-o-skle-ro'-sis) (angio-; okXtjpoc, hard). The induration and thicken- ing of the walls of the blood-vessels.
  • Angiosialitis (an-je-o-si-al-i' -tis) (angio-; o'caXov, saliva; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of the duct of a salivary gland.
  • Angiosis (an- je-o' -sis) (dyjelov, a vessel). Any disease of blood-vessels or of lymphatics.
  • Angiospasm (an' -je-o-spazm) (angio-; oTzaojioc-, a spasm). A vasomotor spasm.
  • Angiospastic (an-je-o-spas'-tik) (see Angio- spasm). Characterized by or of the nature of angiospasm.
  • Angiostenosis (an -je-o- sten - o'- sis) (angio-; Gzkvojacc, a narrowing). Narrowing of a ves- sel.
  • Angiosteogenic, Angiosteogenous (an-je-o- ste-oj'-en-ik, -us) (angio-; ooriov, a bone; yevvav, to produce). Relating to, producing, or produced by calcification of the vessels.
  • Angiosymphysis (an -je-o- sim r - fiz - is) (angio-; adficfruacf, a growing together). The growing together of vessels.
  • Angiosynizesis (an -je -o- sin -e-ze f - sis) (angio-; ouvc^avetv, to collapse). The collapse of the walls of a vessel and subsequent growing together.
  • Angiotelectasia, Angiotelectasis (an je-o-tel- ek-ta'-ze-ah, an-je-o-tel-ek'-ta-sis). See Tel- angiectasis.
  • Angiotenic (an- je-o -ten' -ik) (angio-; re'eveev, to stretch). Due to or marked by distention of the blood-vessels.
  • Angioteria (an-je-o-te' -re-ah) (angio-; xkpic, a wonder). An abnormal development of the vascular system.
  • Angiotitis (an-je-o-ti' -tis) (angio-; otitis). In- flammation of the blood-vessels of the ear.
  • Angiotome (an' -je-o -torn) (angio-; rop.Tj, a cut- ting). The vascular tissue of an embryonic metamere.
  • Angiotomy (an-je-ot'-o-me) (see Angiotome). i. Incision into a vessel. 2. That branch of anatomy relating to the vascular system.
  • Angiotripsy (an-je-o-trip'-se) (see Angiotribe). Vascular torsion and compression by means of the angiotribe.
  • Angophrasia (an-go-fra' -ze-ah) \p-TX^ cv ^ to choke; (ppaotc, utterance). A speech-defect consisting of a choking, drawling utterance, occurring in paralytic dementia.
  • Angor (an'-gor) (angor, a strangling). Syn- onymous with Angina. A. animi, a sense of imminent dissolution. Afpectoris, angina pectoris.
  • Anguillula (an-gwiV '-u-lah) (dim. of anguilla, an eel). A genus of parasitic roundworms. A. stercoralis. See Threadworm.
  • Angulation (an-gu-la' -shun) . The formation of angular loops in the intestine. Angulus (an' -gu-lus) . (L.). See Angle.
  • Anhelation (an-hel-a' -shun) (anhelare, to pant). Shortness of breath; dyspnea.
  • Anhelitus (an-heV -it-us) (L.). 1. Respiration. 2. Difficult respiration; asthma.
  • Anhidrosis (an-hid-ro' -sis) (dv, priv.; idpcoc, sweat). Partial or complete absence of sweat secretion.
  • Anhidrotic (an-hid-rof -ik) (see Anhidrosis), 1. Tending to check sweating. 2. An agent that checks sweating.
  • Anhydrite (an-hi f -drit) . Anhydrous calcium sulfate.
  • Anhydrous (an-hi' '-dries) (see Anhydrid), In chemistry, a term used to denote the absence of water.
  • Anianthinopsy (an-e-an-thin-op' -se) . See Ami- anthinopsy.
  • Anideus (an-id' -e-us) (dv, priv.; e'edoc, form). The lowest form of omphalosite, in which the parasitic fetus is reduced to a shapeless mass of flesh covered with skin.
  • Anidrosis (an-id-ro'-sis). See Anhidrosis.
  • Anidrotic (an-id-rot'-ik). See Anhidrotic.
  • Anilid (an'-il-id) (Ar., al, the; nil, dark blue). A compound formed by the action of acid chlorid or acid anhydrid upon anilin. The anilids are very stable derivatives.
  • Animalcule (an-im-aV -kul) (animalculum, a minute animal). An animal organism so small as to require the microscope for its examination.
  • Anime (an'-im-e) (Fr., anime, origin doubt- ful). A name of various resins, especially that of Hymencea courbaril, a tree of tropical America; sometimes used in plaster, etc. Unof.
  • Aniodol (an-i' -o-dol) . A glycerol solution of trioxymethylene, useful as an antiseptic in % solution.
  • Anion (an'-i-on) (ana, up; Icbv, going). In electrolysis, an electronegative element.
  • Aniridia (an-i-rid'-e-ah) (dv, priv.; ipcc, the rainbow). Absence or defect of the iris.
  • Anisalol (an-is' -al-ol) , C 6 H 4 (OCH 3 )C0 2 C 6 H 5 . The phenyl ester of anisic acid, forming colorless crystals. It is antirheumatic and analgesic. Dose 8-15 gr. (0.52-1.0 Gm.).
  • Anisalyl (an-is' -al-il) (anisic; alcohol), C 8 H 9 0. The univalent radicle of anisic alcohol. A. Hydrate, anisic alcohol.
  • Anisamid (an-is' -am-id) , C 8 H 9 N0 2 . The amid of anisic acid; anisyl amid.
  • Anisated (an'-is-a-ted) (anisum, anise). Con- taining anise.
  • Anise (an' -is). See Anisum.
  • Aniseed (an'-i-sed). Anise-seed. The seed of Pimpinella anisum. See Anisum. Anisic Acid. See Acid, Anisic.
  • Anisi, Spiritus (U. S. P.), a 10% solution of the oil in alcohol. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc).
  • Anisidin (an-is' -id-hi), N(C 7 H 7 0)H 2 . A base obtained from nitranisol by action of am- monium sulfid in alcoholic solution; with acids it forms crystalline compounds. Syn., M ethyl phenidin; Methylamido phenol. A. Ci- trate, an analgesic similar to phenetidin citrate.
  • Anisin (an' -is -in) (anisum, anise), C 22 H 24 N 2 - 3 . A crystalline alkaloid, a derivative of anise.
  • Aniso chromatic (an-is -o-kro -mat' -ik) (avccoc, unequal; ypu)p.a, color). Not having the same color throughout; said of solutions containing two pigments used in testing for color-blindness.
  • Aniso tachys (an-is-ot f -a-kis) (anisos; ~aybc, quick). Applied to an accelerated pulse of varying rapidity.
  • Anisocoria (an - is -0 -ko 1 '-re -ah) (anisos; Kopr), pupil). Inequality of the diameter of the pupils.
  • Anisol (an' -is -of) (see Anisin), C 7 H s O. Methylphenyl ether, produced by heating phenol with potassium and methyl iodid or potassium methyl sulfate in alcoholic solution. It is an ethereal-smelling liquid, boiling at 15 2 ; its sp. gr. at 15 is 0.991.
  • Anisomelous (an - is - om' -el- us) (anisos; pekoe, a limb). Having limbs of unequal length.
  • Anisometropia (an-is-o-met-ro' -pe-ah) (anisos; fihpov, a measure; dxp, the eye). A difference in the refraction of the two eyes.
  • Anisometropic (an-is -0 -met -rop' -ik) (see Anisometropia). Affected with anisomet- ropia.
  • Anisopia (an-is -o r -pe-ah) (anisos; uxp, eye). In- equality of visual power in the two eyes.
  • Anisosthenic (an-is -0 -sthen' -ik) (anisos; odevbc, strength). Not of equal power; used of pairs of muscles.
  • Anisotrophy (an-is-ot'-ro-fe) (see Anisotropal). The quality of being doubly refractive or un- equally refractive in different directions; or of being unequally responsive to external in- fluences.
  • Anisyl (an'-is-il) (anisum), C 8 H 7 2 . A hypo- thetic radicle supposed to be found in anise and its derivatives.
  • Anitin (an'-it-in). A brownish powder ob- tained from ichthyol. In 33 % aqueous solution it combines with phenols, etc., to form anitols. Syn., I chthyo sulfonic acid.
  • Anitol (an'-it-ol). Any one of the soluble compounds formed by anitin with phenols, cresols, etc.; they possess germicidal proper- ties.
  • Ankola (an-ko'-lah) (Hind.). The bitter, em- etic root-bark of Alangium lamarkii, a tree of tropical Asia and Africa. It is used in India in skin diseases and leprosy.
  • Ankyla, Ankyle (ang'-kil-ah, -e) (dyKuXrj, any- thing bent). 1. An angular part, particularly the elbow. 2. Ankylosis of a joint with flexion. 3. Abnormal adhesion of parts.
  • Ankylo tia (ang-kil-o' -she-ah) (dfKuX-q, a loop; ouc, ear). Union of the walls of the meatus auditorius.
  • Ankyloblepharon (ang-kil-o-blef'-ar-on) (an- kyle; ftXicfiapov, the eyelid). The adhesion of the ciliary edges of the eyelids.
  • Ankylocheilia, Ankylochilia (ang-kil-o-ki' -le- ak) (ankyle; ye'cAog, lip). Adhesion of the lips.
  • Ankylocolpos (ang-kil-o-kol'-pos) (ankyle; koItzoc, the vagina). Atresia of the vagina or vulva.
  • Ankylodeire, Ankylodere, Ankyloderis (ang- kil-o-di'-re, -de'-re, ang-kil-oaV -er-is) (ankyle; detpTj, the neck). Wry-neck; torticollis.
  • Ankyloglossia, Ankyloglossum (ang-kil-o- glos'-e-ah, ang-kil-o-glos' -um) (ankyle; yAwooa, the tongue). Tongue-tie.
  • Ankylomele (ang-kil-om'-el-e) (ankyle; fiiXoc, a limb). The abnormal growing together of limbs (as of the fingers or toes).
  • Ankylose (ang'-kil-os) (dy-KuXi), a loop). To be, or to become, consolidated or firmly united.
  • Ankylostoma, Ankylostomum (ang-kil-os' -to- mah, -mum) (dyKuXoc, crooked; ozofxa, a ANKYLOSTOMIASIS 72 ANONA mouth). A genus of nematode worms, one species of which, A. duodenale, is some- times found in the human intestine. It pro- duces a condition analogous to pernicious an- emia.
  • Annatto (an-at'-o). See Annotto. Annectent ian-ek' '-tent) (ad, to; nectere, to bind). Linking or binding together. A. Convolutions. See Convolution.
  • Annidalin (an-id' -al-in) . i. Dithymoltriiodid. A substitute for iodoform and aristol. 2. See Aristol.
  • Annotto (an-ot'-o) (native American). A color- ing-matter obtained from the pellicles of the seeds of Bixa orellana. It is used to color plasters and as an artificial color for butter. Syn., Annatto; Arnotto.
  • Annuens (an'-u-enz) (annuere, to nod). The rectus capitis anticus minor muscle.
  • Anode (an'-od) (see Anodal), The positive pole of a galvanic battery. A., Soluble, Sprague's term for an anode formed of the metal which is deposited.
  • Anodermous (an-o-der' -mus) (a, priv.; okpp.a, the skin). Without the appearance of an epidermis.
  • Anodinia (an -0 -din' -e -ah) (a, priv.; did eg, the pain of childbirth). Absence of labor- pains.
  • Anodontia (an-o -don' -she-ah) (dv, priv.; coouc, tooth). Absence of the teeth.
  • Anodyne (an'-o-din) (dv, priv.; douvq, pain). A medicine that gives relief from pain. A., Hoffmann's. See under Ether.
  • Anodynia (an-o-din'-e-ah) (see Anodyne). 1. Freedom from pain. 2. Loss of sensation. Cf. Anodinia. Anoesia ian-o-e' -ze-ah) (dvorjola, a want of sense). Want of understanding.
  • Anoia (an-oi'-ah) (dvoca, idiocy). Synonym of Idiocy.
  • Anomalous (an-om'-al-us) (see Anomaly), Irregular; characterized by deviation from the common or normal order. Anomaly ian-om' -al-e) (dvcojiaXca, irregularity). A marked deviation from the normal; an abnormal thing or occurrence.
  • Anomous (an-o'-mus) (d, priv.; tofioc, the shoulder). Without shoulders.
  • Anonyma (an-on f -im-ah) (dv, priv.; ovupa, name). The innominate artery.
  • Anonymos (an-on' '-im-us) (see Anonymd\. The cricoid cartilage.
  • Anonymous (an -on' -im-us) (see Anony- ma). Nameless. A. Bone. See Innomina- tum.
  • Anoperineal (a-no-per-in-e'-al). Relating to the anus and the perineum.
  • Anophthalmia (an-of-thal'-me-ah) (dv, priv.; 6af£lv, to devour). 1. Cannibalism. 2. Sex- ual perversion leading to rape, mutilation, and cannibalism.
  • Anthropophobia (an-thro-po-fo'-be-ah) (anthro- po-; (f)6{3oc, fear). A symptom of mental dis- ease consisting in fear of society.
  • Anthropotoxin (an-thro-po-toks' -in) (anthropo-; xo^ckov, poison). The toxic substance sup- posed to be excreted by the lungs of human beings.
  • Anthydropic (ant -hi- drop' '-ik) (anti-; udpco(/>, dropsy). Effective against dropsy.
  • Anthypnotic (ant -hip- not' -ik) (anti-; uizvoz, sleep). 1. Preventive of sleep. 2. An agent that tends to induce wakefulness.
  • Anthysteric (ant-his-ter'-ik) (anti-; uaxipa, the womb). Overcoming hysteria.
  • Anti trismus (an-te-tris' -mus) (anti-; xpiap.bg, a creaking). A condition in which the open mouth cannot be closed.
  • Anti- (an-ti-) (dv-'c, against). A prefix meaning against.
  • AntiCope (an-tik'-op-e) (avrcKo-rj, a beating back). Resonance; reaction; repercussion; counters troke.
  • Antiades (an-ti' -ad-ez) (pi. of dvxtcig, tonsil). The tonsils.
  • Antiagglutinin (an-te -a g-lu' -tin-in). A sub- stance opposed in action to an agglutinin.
  • Antiaggressin (an-te-ah-gres' -in) (anti-; aggres- sin). A hypothetic content of the serum of an animal immunized to aggressin-containing serous exudate produced in a second animal by bacterial, inoculation.
  • Antialbumate (an-te-al' -bu-mat) (anti-; albumen, white of egg). Parapeptone; a product of the imperfect digestion of albumin. It is changed by the pancreatic ferment into antipeptone.
  • Antialbumin (an-te-al' -bu-min) (see Antialbu- mate). One of the products of the action of the digestion of albumin; it is probably one of the preformed substances existing in the proteid molecule.
  • Antialbumose (an-te-al' -bu-mos) (see Antialbu- mate). One of the albumoses produced by the action of pancreatic juice on albumin. It resembles syntonin or acidalbumin, and is convertible into antipeptone.
  • Antiaphrodisiac (an-te-af-ro-diz' -e-ak) . See A naphrodisiac.
  • Antiarin (an-te' -ar -in) (Javanese, antiar or ant- jar), C 14 H 20 O 5 + 2H 2 0. The active prin- ciple of Antiaris toxicaria or Upas antiar, the Javanese poison-tree. It is intensely poisonous and is used as an arrow-poison. It is a cardiac depressant. Dose T qq gr. (0.00065 Cm.). Unof.
  • Antiarthritic (an-te-ar-thrif -ik) . See Antar- thritic.
  • Antiasthmatic (an-te-az-maf -ik) . See A ntasth - ma tic.
  • Antibacterial (an- te-bak-te'- re -al) (anti-; bac- teria). Acting against bacteria.
  • Antibiotic (an-te-bi-ot'-ik) (anti-; p'coc, life). Tending to destroy life.
  • Antiblennorrhagic (an-te-blen-or-aj'-ik) (anti-; ftXkvva, mucus; prffvuvac, to burst). Efficient in preventing or curing gonorrhea.
  • Antibrachial (an-te-bra' -ke-al) (anti-; Ppa%iujv,. The arm). Pertaining to the forearm.
  • Antibrachium (an-te-bra' -ke-um) (see Anti- brachial). The forearm.
  • Anticardium (an-te-kar' -de-um) (anti-; napoca, the heart). The scrobiculus cordis, or pit of the stomach; the infrasternal depression.
  • Anticheirotonus, Antichirotonus (an-te-ki- rot'-o-nus) (anti-; yj'ip, hand; tgvoc, tension). Forcible and steady inflection of the thumb, seen at times in or before attacks of epilepsy.
  • Anticholerin (an-te-kol'-er -in) (anti-; %oXkpa, cholera). A product isolated by Klebs from cultures of cholera bacilli. Immunizing and curative properties have been ascribed to it.
  • Anticipating (an-tis' -ip-a-ting) (anticipare, to take before). Occurring before the regular ANTICLINAL 77 ANTIKATHODE or expected time, as an anticipating inter- mittent fever, one in which the paroxysms occur earlier on successive days.
  • Anticlinal (an-te-kli'-nal) (anti-; kIIvzcv, to slope). Sloping in opposite directions. A. Vertebra, in man, the tenth thoracic ver- tebra, where the thoracic vertebras begin to assume the characters of the lumbar.
  • Anticnemion (an-tik-ne' -me-on) (anti-; Kvrjfir), leg). The shin or front of the leg.
  • Anticnesmatic (an-tik-nes-maf -ik) (anti-; KvfjOfjLOC, itching), i. Efficient against itching. 2. A remedy for itching.
  • Anticoagulant (an-te-ko-ag' -u-lant) (anti-; coag- ulum). i. Opposed to or preventive of coag- ulation. 2. A substance preventing coagula- tion.
  • Anticomplement (an-te-kom' -ple-ment) (anti-; complement). A substance held by Ehrlich in his lateral-chain theory to enter into the composition of an antihemolysin (q. v.). Cf. Antiimmune Body under Body.
  • Anticrisis (an-le-kri'-sis) (anti-; crisis). An agent or phenomenon preventing a crisis.
  • Anticus (an-ti'-kus) (anticus, that in front). Anterior; in front of. Anticyclic Acid. See Acid, Anticyclic.
  • Antidiabeticum (an-te-di-a-bef -ik-um) . A preparation recommended for diabetes, said to consist of wheat starch, sugar of milk, sulfur, powdered senna leaves, and fennel. Syn., Glycosolveol; Glycosolvol.
  • Antidiabetin (an-te-di-ab-ef '-in) . A mixture of saccharin and mannite,. used instead of sugar by diabetics.
  • Antidiastole (an-te-di-as' -to-le) (dvxcocaozoXri, distinction). Differential diagnosis.
  • Antidinic (an-te-din' -ik) (anti-; o'tvoc, a whirl). Curing or preventing vertigo.
  • Antidotal (an -te- do' -tat) (anti-; oo-Sf, given). Having the nature of an antidote.
  • Antidotism (ant'-id-o-tizm) (see Antidotal). Therapeutic or physiologic antagonism; the possession of antidotal properties; the act of giving antidotes.
  • Antiemetic (an-te-em-et'-ik) (anti-; ifxexcKoc, causing vomit). Preventing emesis; relieving nausea.
  • Antiferment (an-te-fer' -ment) (anti-; fermentum, leaven). An agent that prevents fermenta- tion.
  • Antifermentative (an-te-fer-men' -ta-tiv) (anti- ferment). Preventing fermentation.
  • Antigalactic (an-te-gal-ak'-tik) (anti-; jala, milk). 1. Lessening the secretion of milk. 2. A drug that lessens the secretion of milk.
  • Antigermin (an-te-jer'-min). A compound of copper and an acid, forming a yellowish- green, tenacious mass, soluble in 200 parts of water. It is said to be disinfectant, deo- dorant, and bactericidal.
  • Antigerminal (an-te-jer' '-min-al) (anti-; germen, germ). Relating to the pole of the ovum opposed to the germinal pole.
  • Antihelix (an-te-he'-liks). See Anthelix.
  • Antihemo lytic (an-te-hem-o-lit'-ik). Relating to an antihemolysin; not capable of dis- solving blood-corpuscles.
  • Antihemolysin (an-te-hem-o-W -sin) (anti-; alfia, blood; Xuocc, solution). A complex substance developed in the blood-serum as the result of inoculations with hemolysins. It is com- posed of anticomplements and antiimmune bodies.
  • Antihidrotic (an-te-hi-drot'-ik) (anti-; (dpcbf, sweat). 1. Diminishing the secretion of sweat. 2. An agent lessening the secretion of sweat.
  • Antihydropin (an-te-hi'-dro-pin) (anti-; uocop, water). A crystalline principle obtainable from the common cockroach, Blatta (Peri- planeta) orientalis, and said to be diuretic. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.6-1.3 Gm.).
  • Antikamnia (an-te-kam' -ne-ali) (anti-; Kap.v£cv, to suffer pain). A proprietary remedy said to be composed of sodium bicarbonate, acetanilid, and caffein. It is used as an analgesic in doses of 5-10 gr. (0.32-0.65 Gm.).
  • Antikathode (a?i-te-kath , -od) (anti-; kathode). A piece of platinum foil so placed in a Crookes tube as to intercept the kathode rays; being ANTIKOL 78 ANTIPALUDEAN thus rendered fluorescent, it becomes a source of rontgen-rays.
  • Antikol (an' -tik-ol) . A proprietary antipyretic mixture said to contain acetanilid, sodium bicarbonate, and tartaric acid.
  • Antilemic, Antiloemic, Antiloimic (an-te-W - mik, an-te-loi' -mik) (and-; Xocixoc, the plague). Efficacious against the plague or other pesti- lence.
  • Antileptic (an-til-ep'-tik) (ovzcXthJjcc, a receiv- ing in return). Revulsive.
  • Antilithic (an-te-lith' -ik) (anti-; Xcdoc, a stone), i. Efficacious against calculus. 2. An agent preventing the deposit of urinary sedi- ment.
  • Antiloemic (an-ti-le' '-mik) . See Antilemic.
  • Antiluetic (an-te-lu-et'-ik) (anti^; hies, the plague; syphilis). Efficacious against syph- ilis.
  • Antilypyrin (an-te-le-pV '-rin) . An antipyretic and analgesic substance obtained by heat- ing acetanilid, 1 part, with antipyrin, 2 parts. Dose 7-8 gr. (0.45-0.52 Gm.).
  • Antilysin (an-te-W -sin) (anti-; Xuocc, a loosing). A substance opposed to the activity of a lysin.
  • Antilysis (an-tiV -is-is) . The condition due to the activity of antilysins.
  • Antilyssic (an-te-lis' -ik) (anti-; Xuooa, rabies). 1. Tending to cure rabies. 2. A remedy for rabies.
  • Antimetropia (an-te-met-ro 1 '-pe-ah) (anti-; metro- pia). A condition characterized by opposing states of refraction in the two eyes, as, for example, the existence of myopia in one eye and of hyperopia in the other.
  • Antimiasmatic (an-te-mi-as-mat'-ik) (anti-; fitao/Jta, exhalation). Preventive of malaria.
  • Antimonial (an-te-mo' -ne-aV) (antimonium, an- timony). Containing antimony.
  • Antimonic (an-te-mon' -ik) (see Antimonial). A term applied to those compounds of anti- mony that correspond to its higher oxid.
  • Antimonious (an-te-mo' -ne- us) (see Anti- monio.Q. A term denoting those compounds of antimony that correspond to its lower oxid.
  • Antimonium (an-te-mo'-ne-um). See Anti- mony.
  • Antimycotic (an-te-mi-kof -ik) (anti-; p-tfiais, a fungus). Destructive to microorganisms.
  • Antimydriatic (an-te-mid-re-at'-ik) (anti-; (ludpcaocc, mydriasis). 1. Opposed to or ar- resting dilation of the pupils. 2. A drug efficacious against mydriasis.
  • Antinarcotic (an-te-nar-kot'-ik) (anti-; vapnujoce, a benumbing). Preventing narcosis.
  • Antineuralgic (an-te-nu-ral' -jik) (anti-; vzvpov, a nerve; aXyoc, pain). Overcoming neu- ralgia.
  • Antinonnin (an-te-non' -in) , C 6 H 2 . (N0 2 ) 2 .CH 3 - OK, potassium orthodinitrocresylate. See Di- nitrocresol.
  • Antiotomia, Antiotomy (an-te-o-to'-me-ah, an- te-ot'-om-e) (avxikc, a tonsil; xepivecv, to cut). Excision of the tonsils.
  • Antipaludean (an-te-pal-u' -de-an) (anti-; palus, ANTIPARASITIC 79 ANTIRHEUMATIN a marsh). Efficient against malarial dis- eases.
  • Antiparasitic (an-te-par-as-W -ik) (anti-; napaa- cxoc, a parasite). i. Destroying parasites. 2. An agent destroying parasites.
  • Antiparastata (an -te - par - as'- tat - ah) (anti-; 7iapaoxaxj)C, testicle). Cowper's glands.
  • Antipeptone (an-te-pep' -ton) (anti-; nknxecv, to cook; digest). A variety of peptone not acted upon by trypsin.
  • Antiperiodic (an-te-pe-ri-od' -ik) (anti-; nepcodoc, a going round), i. Preventing periodic at- tacks of a disease. 2. A remedy against periodic disease. A. Tincture. See War- burg's Tincture.
  • Antiperistalsis (an-te-per-is-taV -sis) (anti-; nep'c, around; axaXa'cc, compression). Reversed peristalsis.
  • Antiperistaltic (an -te- per - is - tal' - tik) (see Antiperistalsis). Relating to antiperistal- sis.
  • Antiperonosporin (an-te-per -o-nos' '-por-in) . Topasol G. I, an antiseptic preparation of zinc and copper sulfates.
  • Antiphlogistin (an-te-flo-jis' '-tin) . A paste said to consist of kaolin, glycerol, and antisep- tics; it is a substitute for poultices.
  • Antiphlogosis (an-te-flo-go' -sis) (see Antiphlo- gistic). 1. The reduction of inflammation. 2. Inflammation purposely excited to counter- act other inflammation.
  • Antiphthisin (an-te-ti' -sin) . Dilute tuberculin, made from the slight residue after precipita- tion with sodium bismuth iodid.
  • Antiplastic (an-te-plas' -tik) (anti-; nXaooecv, to form). 1. Unfavorable to granulation or to the healing process. 2. An agent impover- ishing the blood. 3. Preventing or checking plastic exudation.
  • Antipodal (an-tip' -od-al) (anti-; tiouc, a foot). Situated directly opposite. A. Cells, a term applied to a group of four cells formed in the lower end of the embryo -sac op- posite to the cells constituting the egg- apparatus. A. Cone, the cone of astral rays opposite to the spindle -fibers.
  • Antipraxia (an-te-praks' -e-ah) (anti-; npaooecv, to do). Antagonism of functions or of symptoms.
  • Antiprostatitis (an-te-pros-tat-i'-tis) (anti-; npooxaxa, the prostate; exec,' inflammation). Inflammation of Cowper's glands. Syn., A ntiparastatitis.
  • Antipruritic (an-te-pru-rif -ik) (anti-; pruritus, itching). 1. Relieving the sensation of itch- ing. 2. A drug that relieves the sensation of itching.
  • Antipsoric (an-tip-so'-rik) (anti-; (pebpa, the itch). Effective against itching or the itch.
  • Antipyresis (an -te- pi -re' -sis) (anti-; nupexdc, fever). The reduction of fever by means of antipyretics.
  • Antipyretic (an-te-pi-ref -ik) (see Antipyresis). 1. Cooling; lowering the temperature. 2. An agent reducing temperature. The most im- portant antipyretic agents are cold, diaphor- etics, and the newer remedies, many of which are coal-tar products, such as antipyrin, acetanilid, phenacetin, etc.
  • Antirabic (an-te-ra' -bik) (anti-; rabies, madness). Preventing or curing rabies.
  • Antirennene (an-te-ren'-en). Morgenroth's name for the principle which appears in the blood of an animal following the introduction of rennet. It has the power of impeding the action of rennet on milk.
  • Antirheumatic (an-te-ru-maf -ik) (anti-; rheu- matism). Preventing or curing rheuma- tism.
  • Antirheumaticum (an-te-ru-maf -ik-um) . A compound of sodium salicylate and methyl- ene-blue. It occurs in blue, prismatic crys- tals, soluble in water and alcohol. Dose 1-1^ gr. (0.06-0.09 Gm.).
  • Antirheumatin (an-te-ru' -mat-in) . An oint- ment used in treatment of rheumatism, and said to contain fluorphenetol, 1 part; di- fluordiphenyl, 4 parts; vaselin, 10 parts; wool-fat, 85 parts.
  • Antiscorbutic (an-te-skor-bu' -tik) (anti-; scor- butus, scurvy). i. Effective against scurvy. 2. A remedy useful in scurvy.
  • Antisensitizer (an-te-sen' '-sit-i-zer) . In Ehr- lich's side-chain theory, a substance antag- onistic in its action to that of the inter- mediary body or sensitizer.
  • Antisepsin (an-te-sep' -sin) (and-; orj^cf, putre- faction), C 6 H 4 BrNHC 2 H 3 0. Asepsin; bro- mated acetanilid; soluble in alcohol and ether, insoluble in water. It is antipyretic, analgesic, and antiseptic. Dose 6-7 gr. (0.30-0.45 Gm.).
  • Antisepticism (an-te-sep' -tis-izm) (see Antisep- sin). The theory or systematic employment of antiseptic methods.
  • Antisepticize (an-te-sep' -tis-lz) (see Antisepsin). To render antiseptic; to treat with anti- septics.
  • Antisialagog (an-te-si-aV -a-gog) (anti-; ocaXov, saliva; ayiDjbg, leading). 1. Preventing or checking salivation. 2. A remedy that is .. effective against salivation.
  • Antisialic (an-te-si-al'-ik) (anti-; a'caXov, saliva). 1. Checking the flow of saliva. 2. An agent that checks the secretion of saliva.
  • Antisideric (an-te-sid-er'-ik) (anti-; owepoc, iron). 1. Incompatible with iron and count- eracting its effects; impoverishing the blood. 2. An agent or drug opposed to the action of iron; one which impoverishes the blood.
  • Antispasmin (an-te-spaz'-min), C 23 H 26 N0 8 Na- + 3NaC 7 H 6 3 . A compound of 1 molecule of narcein sodium united with 3 molecules of sodium salicylate, occurring as a white, slightly hygroscopic powder containing about 50 % of narcein. It is sedative and hypnotic. Dose \-i\ gr. (0.01-0.1 Gm.).
  • Antispasmodic (an-te-spaz-mod'-ik) (anti-; oxaofioc, a spasm). 1. Tending to relieve spasm. 2. An agent relieving convulsions or spasmodic pains, as the narcotics, the nitrites, etc.
  • Antispastic (an-te-s pas' -tik) (anti-; anaozcKoc, drawing). 1. Revulsive; counterirritant. 2. Antispasmodic. 3. A revulsive agent.
  • Antistaphylolysin (an-te-staf-il-o-li' -sin) (anti-; Staphylococci, a genus of bacteria; Xuocc, a loosing). A substance antagonistic to the toxic products of staphylococci, contained in healthy blood -serum.
  • Antistreptococcic (an -te- strep -to- kok'-sik) anti-; Streptococci, a genus of bacteria). An- tagonistic to or preventing the action of streptococci.
  • Antisudoral (an - te - su' - dor - at) (anti-; sudor, sweat). Checking the secretion of sweat.
  • Antisyphilitic (an-te-sif-il-it'-ik) (anti-; syph- ilis). 1. Effective against syphilis. 2. A remedy used in the treatment of syphilis.
  • Antithermic (an-.te-ther'-mik) (anti-; 6ipp.rj, heat). Cooling; antipyretic.
  • Antithermin (an-te-ther' -min) (see Antithermic), C n H )4 2 N 2 . Phenylhydrazinlevulinic acid, a coal-tar derivative used as an antipyretic, an- algesic, and antiseptic. Dose 5 gr. (0.3 Gm.). Unof.
  • Antitoxic (an-te-toks'-ik) (anti-; xo^ckov, poison). Antidotal; counteracting poisons.
  • Antitragic (an-te-traj'-ik) (anti-; ipajog, the tragus). Pertaining to the antitragus. A. Muscle, a mere rudiment in man; it arises from the antitragus, and extends to the cauda of the helix.
  • Antitragus (an-te-tra' -gus) (see Antitragic). An eminence of the external ear opposite the tragus.
  • Antitrope (an'-te-trop) (anti-; xpkrcscu, to turn). Any organ set over against another to form a symmetric pair. Thus, the right eye is an antitrope to the left.
  • Antitypic (an-te -tip' -ik) (anti-; xutzoc;, a type). 1. Efficient against the periodic recurrence of a paroxysm or fever. 2. Irregular; not conformable to a type. 3. An anti- periodic.
  • Antiuratic (an-te-u-rat'-ik). 1. Effica- cious against the deposition of urates. 2. An agent that prevents the deposit of urates.
  • Antivenin (an-te -ven'-in) (anti-; venenum, poison). A serum perfected by Calmette by injecting cobra venom mixed with so- lutions of calcium hypochlorite into horses. It is used in doses of 2-3-5 ( ^ Lr - (10-20 Cc.) in 7 bites of venomous serpents. Syn., Anti- venene.
  • Antivenomous (an-te-ven'-om-us). Antago- nistic to venom; a term applied to im- munized animals, to certain serums, and to antitoxins.
  • Antivirulent (an-te -vir'-u-lent) (anti-; virus, a poison). Effective against viruses.
  • Antizymotic (an-te-zi-mot'-ik) (anti-; £upoj- oYf, fermentation). 1. Preventing or check- ing fermentation. 2. An agent preventing the process of fermentation; an antifer- ment.
  • Antocular (ant-ok' -u-lar) (ante, before; oculus, the eye). Situated in front of the eye.
  • Antorbital (ant -orb'- it -al) (ante, before; or- bita, the orbit). Located in front of the orbit.
  • Antracele (an'-tra-sel) (antrum; K-fjXrj, a tumor). Dropsy of the antrum; an accumulation of fluid in the maxillary sinus.
  • Antral (an'-tral) (antrum). Relating to an antrum.
  • Antrectomy (an-trek' '-to-me) (antrum; inxoprj, excision). Surgical removal of the walls of the antrum.
  • Antritis (an-tri'-tis) (antrum; exec, inflamma- tion). Inflammation of an antrum.
  • Antronalgia (an-tron-aV -je-ah) (antrum; dXyog, pain). Pain in the antrum.
  • Antrophore (an'-tro-or). Cacao-butter bou- gies, containing tannin, 5 %; resorcinol, 5 %; thallin sulfate, 2 to 5%; zinc sulfate, 0.5%.
  • Antroscope (an'-tro-skdp) (antrum; okotzeiv, to look). An instrument for examining the max- illary sinus.
  • Antrotome (an'-tro-tom) (antrum; xepveiv, to cut). An instrument for the performance of mastoid antrotomy.
  • Antrotomy (an-trot'-o-me). Incision of an an- trum.
  • Antrotympanic (an-tro-tim-pan'-ik) (antrum; xupnavov, a drum). Relating to the cavity of the tympanum and to the tympanic antrum.
  • Anuresis (an-u-re'-sis) (dv, priv.; oupov, urine). " Anuria.
  • Anuric (an-u'-rik) (see Anuresis). Pertaining to anuria. Anurous ian-u' -rus) (dv, priv.; oupa, a tail). Without a tail.
  • Anvil (an'-vit). See Incus.
  • Anydremia,Anydrasmia (an-id-re' -me-ah). See Anhydremia.
  • Anypnia (an-ip r -ne-ah) (di>, priv.; o-voc, sleep). Sleeplessness. Anytol. See Anitol.
  • Aortal (a-ort'-al) (see Aorta). Relating to the aorta.
  • Aortitis (a-ort-i' -tis) (aorta; crcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the aorta. A., Nummular, .that characterized by white, circular patches in the inner coat.
  • Aortoclasia, Aortoclasis (a-or-to-kla' '-ze-ah, -sis) (aorta; nXaocc, a breaking). Rupture of the aorta.
  • Aortolithia (a-or-to-lith' -e-ah) . A calcareous deposition in the aorta.
  • Aortomalacia, Aortomalaxia (a-ort-o-mal-a' - se-ah, -aks'-e-ah) (aorta; p.olan'ta, softening). Softening of the aorta.
  • Aortosclerosis (a-ort-o-skle-ro' -sis) (aorta; okXtj- poc, hard). Induration of the aorta.
  • Aortostenosis (a-ort-o-sten-o' -sis) (aorta; orevdc, narrow). Stenosis or narrowing of the aorta. Apatropin iap-at' -ro-pin) (dub, from; atropin), C l7 H 21 N0 2 . A compound derived from atro- pin by the action of nitric acid. It is said to produce peculiar convulsions.
  • Ape (dp) (ME.). A man-like monkey. A. Fis- sures, those fissures of the human brain that are also found in apes. A. -hand, a peculiar shape of the hand produced by the wasting of the thumb-muscles; it is seen in some cases of progressive muscular atrophy.
  • Apellous (ah-pel'-us) (d, priv.; xkXla, skin). Skinless.
  • Apepsia (ah-pep' '-se-ah) (d, priv.; izinrecv, to digest). Cessation or absence of the digestive function. A., Hysteric, apepsia due to hys- teria. Syn., Hysteric anorexia. A. nervosa. See Anorexia nervosa.
  • Apeptic (ah-pep'-tik) (see Apepsia). Affected with apepsia.
  • Aperistalsis (ah-per-is-taV -sis) (a, priv.; xepi, around; oxalate;, constriction). Cessation of the peristaltic movements of the intestine.
  • Aphacia (ah-fa' -se-ah). See Aphakia.
  • Aphacic (ah-fa' -sik). See Aphakic.
  • Aphagia (ah-fa' -je-ah) (a, priv.; (fiayelv, to eat). Inability to eat or to swallow.
  • Aphakia (ah-fa' -ke-aK) (a, priv.; (fraKoc, a lentil; the crystalline lens). The condition of an eye without the lens.
  • Aphakic (ah-fa' -kik) (see Aphakia). Not pos- sessing a crystalline lens.
  • Aphasiac (ah-fa' -ze-ak) (see Aphasia.) One who is aphasic.
  • Aphasic (ah-fa'-zik) (see Aphasia). Relating to or affected with aphasia.
  • Aphemesthesia (ah -fem-es-the' ' -ze-ah) (a, priv.; (prjfir), voice; a'coOrjotc, sensation). Word- blindness; word-deafness.
  • Aphemia (ah-fe'-me-ah) (a, priv.; (f^WV^ voice). Motor aphasia; inability to articulate words or sentences from centric and not from peripheral disease. See Aphasia.
  • Aphemic (ah-fem'-ik) (see Aphemia.) Relating to or affected with aphemia.
  • Aphlogistic (ah-flo-jist'-ik) (a, priv.; (f)M£, a flame). 1. Noninflammable. .2. Burning without flame.
  • Aphonic (ah-fon'-ik) (see Aphonia). Speech- less; voiceless.
  • Aphorama, Aphorema (af-o-ra'-mah, -re'-mah) (acfropav, to have in full view). The state of having projecting eyes, enabling one to see at a distance on each side without moving the head.
  • Aphoria (ah-fo'-re-ah) (a, priv.; - pcodrjc, foamy), C 52 H 82 23 . A glucosid con- stituent of the cotyledons of horse-chestnut. It is a colorless, amorphous powder, soluble in alcohol and water, its watery solution frothing like soap.
  • Aphrodisia (af-ro-diz'-e-ah) ('Afipodhrj, Venus). Sexual desire, especially when morbid or immoderate; sexual congress.
  • Aphrodisiac (af-ro-diz'-e-ak) (see Aphrodisia). i. Stimulating the sexual appetite; erotic. 2. An agent stimulating the sexual passion.
  • Apoplectic (ap-o-plek'-tik) (apoplexy). Pertain- ing to or affected with apoplexy. A. Equiva- lents, a name given to the premonitory symp- toms of apoplexy, indicating that the brain is subject to alterations in blood-pressure.
  • Apoquinamin (ap-o-kwin'-am-in), C 19 H 22 N 2 0. An artificial alkaloid occurring as a white, amorphous substance derived from quinamin, conquinamin, or quinamidin by action of hydrochloric acid.
  • Aporetin (ap-o-re' -tin) (and, from; prjrhr), a resin). A resinous substance found in rhu- barb.
  • Aporocephalous (ap-o-ro-sef -al-us) (dnopoc, difficult to distinguish; aecfraArj, the head). Having a head scarcely distinguishable.
  • Apositia (ap-o-sif -e-ah) (and, from; o'cxoc, food). Aversion to or loathing of food.
  • Apostasis (ap-os'-tas-is) (anooxaocc, a standing away from). 1. An abscess. 2. The end or the crisis of an attack of disease; termina- tion by crisis. 3. An exfoliation.
  • Apothem, Apothema (ap' '-o-them, ap-oth'-em- ah) (and, from; dkfia, a deposit). A brown powder deposited from vegetable infusions or decoctions exposed to the air.
  • Apothesis (ap-oth'-es-is) (dnodeocc, a putting back). The reduction of a fracture or luxa- tion.
  • Apotheter (ap-oth'-et-er). A navel-string re- positor devised by Braun, consisting of a staff with a sling attached in which the pro- lapsed funis is placed and carried up into the uterine cavity.
  • Apparition (ap-ar-ish' -un) (apparitio, an ap- pearance). 1. A visual delusion or hallucina- tion. 2. The sudden aggregation of scattered principles into an element or corpuscle.
  • Appendalgia (ap-end-al f -je-ah) (appendix; aX- yoc, pain). Pain in the appendicular region.
  • Appendectomy (ap-en-dek'-to-me). See Appen- dicectomy.
  • Appendiceal, Appendicial (ap-en-di-se f -al, ap- en-di' -she-al) . See Appendicular.
  • Appendicectomy (ap-en-dis-ek' -to-me) (appen- dix; iicTotirj, excision). Excision of the ver- miform appendix.
  • Appendicular (ap-en-dik' -u-lar) (appendicular a small appendix). Pertaining to the vermi- form appendix. A. Colic, a spasmodic colicky pain originating in the appendix.
  • Appendiculate (ap-ew-dik'-u-lat). Having ap- pendages or protruding accessory parts.
  • Apperception (ap-er-sep' '-shun) (appercipere, to perceive). The conscious reception or per- ception of a sensory impression; the power of receiving and appreciating sensory im- pressions.
  • Applanate (ap'-lan-dt) (ad, to; planus, flat). Horizontally flattened.
  • Applanatio, Applanation (ap-lan-a'-she-o, ap- lan-a'-shun) (L.). A flattening. A. cornese, flattening of the entire surface of the cornea from disease.
  • Applicator (ap' ' -lilz-a-tor) (L.). An instrument used in making applications.
  • Apposition (ap-o-zish' -un) (apponere, to apply to). 1. The act of fitting together; the state of being fitted together. 2. An addition of parts. 3. Development by accretion.
  • Apraxia (ah-praks' '-e-ah) (a, priv.; xpaooetv, to do). Soul-blindness; mind-blindness; ob- ject-blindness; an affection in which the memory for the uses of things is lost, as well as the understanding of the signs by which the things are expressed.
  • Aproctia (ah-prok' -she-ah) (d, priv.; npajKroe, anus). Absence of the anus.
  • Aprosopia (ah-pro-so' -pe-ah) (a, priv.; npboumov, the face). A form of fetal monstrosity with absence of part or all of the face.
  • Apselaphesia (ap-sel-af-e' '-ze-ah) (a, priv.; f)occ, touch). Loss of the tactile sense.
  • Apsithyria, Apsithurea (ah-psith-i'-re-ah, -u'- re-ah) (a, priv.; ^cdupc^ecv, to whisper). Hysteric aphonia, in which the patient loses the voice and is also unable to whisper.
  • Apsychia (a-si' -ke-ah) (a, priv.; (, around; dazrjp, star). In biology, those am- phiasters concerned in the production of the polar globules.
  • Archangelica (ark-an-jel' -ik-ah) (apyhxyzloc, archangel). A genus of umbelliferous plants. See Angelica.
  • Archebiosis (ar-ke-bi-o'-sis) (arch-; fi'toc, life). Spontaneous generation.
  • Archegenesis (ark-e-jen'-es-is). The same as Archebiosis.
  • Archenteron (ark-en' -ter -on) (arch-; evzspov, intestine). The embryonic alimentary cav- ity.
  • Archetype (ar'-ke-tip) (arch-; zbr.oc, a type). In comparative anatomy, an ideal type or form with which the individuals or classes may be compared. A standard type.
  • Archiblastic (ar-ke-blas' -tik) (see Archiblast). Derived from the archiblast. The paren- chymatous tissues are regarded as archi- blastic.
  • Archiblastoma (ar-ke-blas -to' '-mah) (archiblast; op.a, a tumor). A tumor composed of archi- blastic tissue, such as myoma, neuroma, papilloma, adenoma, carcinoma, etc.
  • Archiblastula (ar-ke-blas' -tu-lali) (see Archi- blast). In embryology 7 , a ciliated, vesicular morula, resulting from complete and regular yelk-division and by invagination forming the archigastrula.
  • Archigaster (ar-ke-gas' -ter) (archi-; yaorrjp, belly). The primitive, perfectly simple intes- tine; archenteron.
  • Archigastrula (ar-ke-gas' '-tru-lah) (see Archi- gaster). The gastrula as it is observed in the most primitive types of animal develop- ment; called also bell-gas trula, from its shape.
  • Archigenesis (ar-ke-jen' -es-is). See Archebio- sis.
  • Archiinonerula (ar-ke-mon-er' -u-laK) (archi-; fiovrjprjf, single; solitary). In embryology, a special name given by Haeckel to the monerula stage of an egg undergoing prim- itive and total cleavage.
  • Archil (ar'-kil) (ME., orchell). A coloring- matter similar to litmus, chiefly obtained from the lichen, Roccella tinctoria; used for staining animal tissues.
  • Archimorula (ar-ke-mor' -u-lah) (archi-; p.bpov, a mulberry). In embryology, the solid mass of cleavage cells, or mulberry mass, arising from the segmentation of an archicytula, and preceding the archiblastula and archi- gastrula.
  • Archinephron (ar-ke-nef-ron) (archi-; veu(xa, a swelling). Swelling of a joint.
  • Aritidynamic (an-te-di-nam'-ik) (anti-; duvapicc, force). Weakening. ' Antidysenteric (an-te-dis-en- ter'- ik) (anti-; duaevrep'ca, dysentery). 1. Serviceable against dysentery. 2. A remedy for dysentery.
  • Arnylopsin (am -il- op' -sin) (amylon; o^f, appearance). A ferment found in the pan- creatic juice, which changes starch into sugar.
  • Arthroplasty (ar'-thro-plas-te) (arthro-; nXaoaetv, to form). The making of an artificial joint.
  • Arthropodous (ar-throp' -o-dus) (arthro-; node, a foot). _ In biology, having jointed legs.
  • Arthropyosis (ar- thro - pi - o' - sis ) ( arthro-; TtuciJocc, suppuration). Pus-formation in a joint.
  • Arthrorrhagia ( ar - thro - ra'-je -ah) ( arthro-; prjyvuvat, to burst forth). Hemorrhage into a joint.
  • Arthrosia (ar-thro' -ze-ah) (arthron). Painful inflammatory or other affection of a joint.
  • Arthrosis (ar-thro' -sis) (dpdpbecv, to fasten by a joint). Articulation or jointing.
  • Arthrospore (ar'-thro-spor) (arthro-; onopoc, a seed). A permanent form assumed by some bacteria, chiefly the cocci. It is analogous to a spore.
  • Arthrosteitis (ar-thro-ste-i' -tis) (arthro-; oarkov. bone; ertc, inflammation). Inflammation of the bone about a joint.
  • Arthrostenosis (ar - thro - sten - o' - sis) (arthro-; orivojoic, a narrowing). Contraction of a joint.
  • Arthrotomy (ar-throf -o-me) (arthro-; zkp.vzcv, to cut). Incision of a joint.
  • Arthrotropia (ar-thro-tro' -pe-ah) (arthro-; rpo~r h a turning). Torsion of a limb. Arthro typhoid iar-thro-ti'-joid). Typhoid fever with articular involvement.
  • Arthroxerosis (ar -thro -zer-o' -sis) (arthro-; sipcootr, a dry state). Chronic osteoarthri- tis.
  • Artiad (ar'-te-ad) (apzcoc, even). In chemistry, a term designating atoms having an even quantivalence, as oxygen, which is bival- ent.
  • Articular (ar-tik f -u-lar) (articiilaris, of the joints). Pertaining to an articulation or joint.
  • Articulate (ar-tik 1 '-n-lat) (articalare, to divide in joints). Divided into joints; distinct. A. Speech, the communication of ideas by spoken words.
  • Artifact (ar'-te-fakt). See Artefact.
  • Artiyls (ar'-te-ils) (apnoc, complete). Lowig's name for hydrocarbons of the general formula CnH 2n .
  • Aryepiglottic (ar-e-ep-e-glot f -ik). Same as A rytenoepiglottic.
  • Arytenoidectomy (ar-e-ten-oid-ek' -to-me) (ary- tenoid; inTop.7), a cutting-out). Removal of an arytenoid cartilage.
  • Arytenoiditis (ar-e-ten-oid-i'-tis). Inflamma- tion of the arytenoid cartilage or muscles. Arythmia iar-ith' -me-ah). See Arrhythmia. Arythmic iar-ith' -mik). See Arrhythmic. Asab (Ar.). An African venereal disease said to differ from syphilis.
  • Asaphia (as-a'-fe-ah) (doafica, indistinctness). Indistinctness of utterance, especially that due to cleft palate.
  • Asaprol (as'-ap-rol), CaC 20 H 14 S 2 O 8 + 3H 2 O. Calcium betanaphthol-a-monosulfonate, a substance readily soluble in water and alcohol, and recommended in asthma, tonsillitis, and acute articular rheumatism, in doses of from 15-60 gr. (1-4 Gm.).
  • Asarol (as'-ar-ol) (asarum; oleum, oil), C 10 H ls O. A camphor-like body derived from asarum.
  • Asbestiform (as-best' -e-f or m) (asbestos). Fibrous in structure.
  • Asbolic, Asbolicous, Asbolicus (as-bol'-i'k, -us) (avSoXoc, soot). Sooty; due to soot; e. g., carcinoma scroti asbolicum.
  • Asbolin (as'-bol-in) (see Asbolic). A bitter, acrid, yellow oil extracted from soot; it is used in tuberculosis.
  • Ascariasis (as-kar-i' -as-is) (ascaris). The symptoms produced by the presence of ascar- ides in the gastrointestinal canal.
  • Ascaricide (as-kar'-is-id) (ascaris; ccedere, to kill). A medicine that kills ascarides.
  • Ascending (as-end'-ing) (ascendere, to rise).
  • Ascitic (as-it'-ik) (see Ascites). Pertaining to or affected with ascites.
  • Asclepiadin (as-kle-pi'-ad-in) (asclepias). A bitter glucosid obtainable from various species of Asclepias. It is poisonous, and has emetic, purgative, and sudorific properties. Unof.
  • Asclepin (as-kle'-pin) (asclepias). 1. A poi- sonous principle obtainable from asclepiadin by the separation of glucose from the latter. 2. The precipitate from a tincture of Asclepias tuberosa; alterative, evacuant, tonic, sedative. Dose 2-4 gr. (0.13-0.26 Gm.). Unof.
  • Ascoidium (as-ko-id' -e-um) (ascus; eldoc, like- ness). A genus of Infusoria found in the urine and feces of typhoid fever patients, in sewage, in the excrement of cattle, and in the cecum of swine.
  • Ascospore (as'-ko-spor) (ascus; oizopoc, spore). A spore produced by or in an ascus.
  • Ascus (as'-kus) (aonoc, a bag or bladder). The characteristic spore-case of some fungi and lichens, usually consisting of a single terminal cell containing eight spores. Aselli's Pancreas. A group of lymphatic glands situated at the root of the mesentery.
  • Asemasia (ah-sem-a'-ze-ah) (a, priv.; arjpLaom, a signaling). Absence of the power to com- municate either by signs or by language.
  • Asepsin (ah-sep' -sin) . See Antisepsin.
  • Asepsis (ah-sep' -sis) (a, priv.; or)tycc, putrefac- tion). Absence of pathogenic microorgan- isms.
  • Aseptic (ah-sep' -tik) (a, priv.; or)7ixbg, sep- tic). Free from pathogenic bacteria, as asep- tic wounds. A. Surgery, the mode of sur- gical practice in which everything that is used, as well as the wound, is in a germ-free condition.
  • Asepticism (ah-sep' -tis-izm) (see Aseptic). The doctrine or principles of aseptic surgery.
  • Asepticize (ah-sep' -tis-iz) (see Aseptic). To render aseptic.
  • Aseptin (ah-sep' -tin) (see Aseptic). A secret preparation containing boric acid, used for preserving articles of food.
  • Aseptol (ah-sep' -tol) (see Aseptic), C 6 H 6 S0 4 . A reddish liquid, with an odor of phenol, recommended as a disinfectant and antiseptic. It is used externally (1 to 10% solution) and internally in about the same dose as phenol. Syn., Sozolic acid; Sulfocarbolic acid.
  • Aseptolin (ah-sep' -tol-in). A preparation of pilocarpin (0.018%) in an aqueous solution of phenol (2.74%); it is used in tuberculosis and in malaria. Dose 50-70 min. (3-4 Cc.) daily, injected subcutaneously.
  • Asexual (ah-seks'-u-al) (a, priv.; sexus, sex). Without sex; nonsexual. Ash (ME., asch). 1. The incombustible min- eral residue that remains when a substance is incinerated. 2. See Manna. A. Marina. See Manna. A., Prickly. See Xanthoxy- lum.
  • Asialia (as-e-a'-le-ah) (d, priv.; o'caXov, spittle). Deficiency or failure of the secretion of saliva.
  • Asiatic (a-zhe-at'-ik) (Asia). Pertaining or belonging to Asia. A. Cholera. See Cholera, Asiatic. A. Pill, a pill composed of arsenic trioxid, black pepper, powdered licorice, and mucilage.
  • Asimina (as-im-e'-nah) (L.). A genus of trees. A. triloba is the papaw tree of North America.
  • Asitia (ah-sit'-e-ah) (a, priv.; a'cxog, food). The want of food; also a loathing for food.
  • Askelia (ah-ske'-le-ah) (a, priv.; onkXoc, leg). Nondevelopment of the legs.
  • Asphyxiant (as-fiks'-e-ant) (see Asphyctic). 1. Producing asphyxia. 2. An agent capable of producing asphyxia.
  • Asphyxiate (as-fiks'-e-dt) (see Asphyctic). To produce or cause asphyxia.
  • Aspidiopsoriasis (as-pid-e-o-so-ri' -as-is) (da- Ti'cdcov, a little shield; psoriasis). A form of psoriasis marked by the formation of scutiform scales.
  • Aspidosamin (as-pid-os'-am-in), CgatyS^Og. A basic principle from quebracho bark. It is emetic. Unof.
  • Aspidosperma (as-pid-o-sper' -mah) (dan eg, a shield; onkpixa, a. seed). A genus of apo- cynaceous trees, of which the quebracho is the most important.
  • Aspidospermin (as-pid-o-sper' -min) (see Aspi- dosperma), C22H3QN202. An alkaloid extracted from quebracho (Aspidosperma quebracho). It is a respiratory stimulant and antispas- modic. Dose 1-2 gr. (0.065-0.13 Gm.).
  • Aspiration (as-pir-a' -shun) (ad, to; spirare, to breathe). 1. The act of sucking up or sucking in; inspiration; imbibition. 2. The act of using the aspirator. 3. A method of withdrawing the fluids and gases from a cavity. A. Pneumonia. See Pneumonia, Aspiration.
  • Aspirator (as'-pir-a-tor) (see Aspiration). An apparatus for withdrawing liquids from cavi- ties by means of suction.
  • Aspirin (as'-pir-in). The acetic-acid ester of salicylic acid; small needles without color or taste, used as an antipyretic and analgesic, as is sodium salicylate. Dose 15 gr. (1 Gm.). Syn., Acetyl salicylic acid.
  • Asporogenic (ah-spor-o-jen'-ik) (d, priv.; oizbpoc;, seed; jevqc, producing). Not repro- ducing by means of spores; not producing spores.
  • Assault (as-awlt') (assalire, to assail). An attack. A., Criminal, in medical jurispru- dence, the touching or attempting to touch, on the part of a male, any of the sexual organs (the breasts included) of a female against her will, even though they be covered by clothing.
  • Assideration (as-id-er-a' -shun) (ad, intensive; sideratio, an evil influence). In forensic medicine, infanticide by immersing in ice- cold water.
  • Assimilable (as-im'-il-a-bl) (assimulare, to make like). Capable of being assimilated; nutritious.
  • Assuetude (as'-we-tud). Habituation to dis- turbing influences; the condition of the organism in which it has acquired such tol- erance for a drug or poison that the effect it once had is lost.
  • Assurin (as'-u-rin), C 4B H 94 N 2 P 2 9 . A name given by Thudichum to a complex substance occurring in brain tissue.
  • Astasia (ah-sta' -se-ah) (a, priv.; axaacc, stand- ing). Motor incoordination for standing. A. -abasia, a symptom consisting in inability to stand or walk in a normal manner. The person affected seems to collapse when attempting to walk.
  • Aster (as'-ter) (L., "a star"). The stellate form assumed by the mitome of the nucleus when undergoing karyokinesis.
  • Astereognosis (ah-ste-re-og-no'-sis) (a, priv.; oxzpeoc, solid; yvcbacc, knowledge). Inability to recognize objects by the sense of touch, due to lesion in the central parietal lobule. Syn., Stereoagnosis. Cf., Aphasia, Tactile.
  • Asterion (as-te' -re-on) (aster). A point on the skull corresponding to the junction of the occipital, parietal, and temporal bones.
  • Asternal (ah-ster' -not) (a, priv.; axkpvov, the breast-bone). Not connected with the ster- num. A. Ribs, the five lower pairs, because not joined directly to the sternum.
  • Asternia (ah-ster 1 '-ne-ah) (see Asternal). Ab- sence of the sternum.
  • Asteroid (as'-ter-oid) (aster; eldoc, likeness). 1. Stellate. 2. See Astrocyte.
  • Asthenia (ah-sthen-e'-ah or ah-sthe' '-ne-ah) (a, priv.; ad hoc, strength). Absence of strength; adynamia. Syn., Lipopsychia.
  • Asthenic (ah-sthen' -ik) (see Asthenia). Char- acterized by asthenia.
  • Asthenogenia, Asthenogenesis (ah-sthen-o-je' '- ne-ah, ah-sthen-o-jen' -es-is) (asthenia ; yevvav, to produce). The production of asthenia.
  • Asthenometer (ah-sthen-om' -et-er) (asthenia; phpov, a measure). An instrument for de- tecting and measuring asthenia; especially, a device for measuring muscular asthenopia.
  • Asthenopic (ah-sthen-o p' -ik) (see Asthenopia). Characterized by asthenopia.
  • Asthmatic (az-mat'-ik) (see Asthma). Relat- ing to or affected with asthma.
  • Asthmatorthopnea, Asthmorthopnea (az- mat-or-thop' -ne-ah, az-mor-thop' -ne-ah) (asth- ma; orthopnea). Orthopnea due to asthma or respiratory obstruction located in the chest.
  • Astigmatic (ah-stig -mat' ' -ik) (astigmatism). Pertaining to or affected with astigmatism.
  • Astigmatometer (ah-stig-mat-om' -et-er) (astig- matism; fikvpov, a measure). An instru- ment for measuring the degree of astig- matism.
  • Astigmia (ah-stig' -me-ah). See Astigmatism.
  • Astigmometer (ah-stig-mom' -et-er) . See As- tigmatometer .
  • Astigmometry (ah-stig-mom' -et-re) . The meas- urement of astigmatism.
  • Astomia (ah-sto' -me-ah) (a, priv.; oxdp.a, a mouth). The condition of having no mouth.
  • Astragalectomy (as-trag-al-ek'-to-me) (astrag- alus; Ikto/jlt), excision). Excision of the as- tragalus.
  • Astragalo calcaneal (as-lrag-al-o-kal-ka'-ne-af). Relating to the astragalus and calcaneum.
  • Astragalo tibial (as-trag-al-o-tib'-e-al). Relat- ing to the astragalus and the tibia.
  • Astragaloscaphoid (as-trag-al-o-skaf'-oid) . Relating to the astragalus and the scaphoid bone.
  • Astraphobia, Astrapaphobia (as-trah-fo'-be-ah, as -trap -a) -0' -be-ah) (doxpanrj, lightning; fj/.u, to speak). Lack of coordination in speech.
  • Ataxospasmodic (at-aks-o-spas-mod'-ik). Af- fected with choreic ataxia or relating to it.
  • Ataxy (at-aks'-e). See Ataxia.
  • Atelectatic (at-el-ek-tat'-ik) (see Atelectasis), Relating to or characterized by atelectasis.
  • Atelia (at-e' -le-ah) (drkkeca, imperfection). Im- perfect development. The word is com- pounded with others to designate the part affected, as atelocardia, etc., imperfect de- velopment of the heart, etc.
  • Atelo- (at-el-o-). A prefix signifying imperfect development.
  • Atelocardia (at-el-o -kar' -de -ah) (atelo-; mpdca, heart). An imperfect or undeveloped state of the heart.
  • Atelocephalous (at-el-o-sef'-al-us) (atelo-; KefaXr), head). Having the skull or head more or less incomplete.
  • Atelocheilia (al-el-o-ki' -le-ah) (atelo-; x £C ^°C, lip). Defective development of a lip.
  • Atelocheiria (at-el-o - ki'- re - ah) (atelo-; X^'ip, hand). Defective development of the hand.
  • Ateloencephalia (at-el-o -en- sef - a'- le - ah) (atelo-; eynkcjiaXoc, brain). Incomplete devel- opment of the brain.
  • Ateloglossia (at-el-o-glos' -e-ah) (atelo-; yXibooa, tongue). Congenital defect in the tongue.
  • Atelognathia (at-el-o g-na' -the-ah) (atelo-; ■fvadog, jaw). Imperfect development of a jaw, especially of the lower jaw.
  • Atelomyelia (at-el-o-mi-e' -le-ah) (atelo-; pozlbc, marrow). Congenital defect of the spinal cord.
  • Atelopodia (at-el-o-po' -de-ah) (atelo-; nobc, foot). Defective development of the foot.
  • Ateloprosopia (at-el-o-pro-so' -pe-ah) (atelo-; Trpdaconov, face). Incomplete facial develop- ment.
  • Atelorachidia (at-el-o-rak-id'-e-ah) (atelo-; pd%cc, spine). Imperfect development of the spinal column, as in spina bifida.
  • Atelostomia (at-el-o-sto' -me-ah) (atelo-; axbpa, mouth). Incomplete development of the mouth,.
  • Athermanous (ah-ther' -man-us) . Impervious to radiant heat.
  • Athermic, Athermous (ah-ther' -mik, -mus). i. Without fever. 2. See Athermanous.
  • Athermosystaltic (ah-ther -mo-sist-aV -till) (a, priv.; dip/XT), heat; ouoxaXxcuoc, drawing to- gether). Applied to muscles which do not contract under the influence of heat.
  • Atherosis (ath-er-o' -sis) (dd-qp-q, gruel). A synonym of Atheroma (2).
  • Athetoid (ath'-et-oid) (athetosis). Pertaining to or affected with athetosis. A. Spasm, a spasm in which the affected member per- forms athetoid movements.
  • Athrepsia (ah-threps'-e-ah) (a, priv.; xpkfocv, to nourish). Malnutrition.
  • Athymia (ah-thi' '-me-ah) (a, priv.; dupoc, spirit). 1. Despondency. 2. Loss of con- sciousness. 3. Insanity.
  • Athyrea, Athyria (ah-thi' -re-ah) (a, priv.; thyroid). The condition arising from ab- sence of the thyroid gland or suppression of its function. Syn., Myxedema. Cf. Thyreo- privus.
  • Athyreosis (ah-thi-re-o'-sis). Atrophy "or ab- sence of the thyroid gland and the patho- logic condition consequent upon elimination of its function.
  • Athyroidea (ah-thi-roid'-e-ah). Absence of the thyroid gland.
  • Athyroidemia (ah-thi-roid-e' -me-ah) . Davel's name for myxedema.
  • Atlantoaxial (at-lant-o-aks'-e-al). See Atlo- axoid.
  • Atlas (at'-las) (axXac, able). The first of the cervical vertebras. It articulates with the occipital bone of the skull and with the axis.
  • Atloaxoid (at-lo-aks'-oid). Relating to the bones termed the atlas and the axis.
  • Atlodymus (at-lod' -im-us) (dxXac, able; d'cdu- fioc, double). A monstrosity with two heads on one neck and a single body.
  • Atmiatry (at-mi'-at-re) (drp.cc, vapor; laxpeca, medical treatment). Treatment of diseases of the lungs or mucous membranes by in- halation, fumigation, or by directing a cur- rent of vapor or gas upon the part.
  • Atmic (at' -mik) (dxpic, vapor). Relating to, due to, or consisting of vapor.
  • Atmidalbumin (at-mid-al' -bu-min) . A sub- stance standing between the albuminates and the albumoses, obtained by Neumeister at the same time with atmidalbumose.
  • Atmidalbumose (at-mid-al' -bu-moz) . Neu- meister's name for a body obtained by the action of superheated steam on fibrin.
  • Atmiometer (at-mi-om'-et-er). A closed cab* ATMO- 114 ATRETOLEMIA inet with apparatus for treating diseases by means of atmiatry.
  • Atmo- (at-mo-) (dxp.dc, vapor; breath). A pre- fix meaning vapor or breath.
  • Atmocausia, Atmocausis (at-mo-kaw' 'se-ah, -sis) (atmo-; muotc, a burning). Therapeutic cauterization with steam by means of an atmocautery.
  • Atmocautery (at-mo -kaw'-ter-e). A double- channeled intrauterine catheter provided with fenestras in both tubes.
  • Atmograph (at' -mo - graf) (atmo-; ypafecv, to record). A form of self-registering res- pirometer.
  • Atmolysis (at-mol'-is-is) (atmo-; Xuocc, loosing). A method of separating the ingredients of mixed gases or vapors by means of their dif- ferent diffusibility through a porous substance.
  • Atmometer, Atmidometer (at-mom' -et-er, at- mid-om' -et-er) (atmo-; pkxpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring the amount of water exhaled by evaporation from a given surface in a given time, in order to determine the humidity of the atmosphere.
  • Atmospherization (at - mos - fer - iz - a'- shun) . The conversion of venous into arterial blood by the absorption of oxygen. Cf . Dearte- rtalization.
  • Atmotherapy (al-mo-ther'-ap-e) (atmo-; depa- nz'ca, therapy). A name given by Pitres to the treatment of certain tics by methodic reduction of respiration.
  • Atocia (at-o' -se-ah) (axonoc, barren). Sterility of the female.
  • Atomicity (at-om-is' -it-e) (see Atom). Chemic valence; quantivalence.
  • Atomization (at - om -iz-a' - shun) (see Atom). The mechanic process of breaking up a liquid into fine spray.
  • Atomizer (at' -om-i-zer) (see Atom). An in- strument for transforming a liquid into a spray.
  • Atonic (at - on'- ik) (atony). Relating to or characterized by atony.
  • Atony (at'-o-ne) (dxov'ca, want of tone). Want of power, especially of muscular power.
  • Atoxogen (ah-toks'-o-jen) (d, priv.; xo^ckov, poison; ytvvdv, to produce). A' defensive substance resembling the enzyms and chem- ically allied to toxins and antitoxins prepared from the adrenals and spleen of the horse.
  • Atrabiliary (at-rah-biV -e-a-re) (atra, black; bilis, bile). Pertaining to black bile. A. Capsules, an old name for the suprarenal capsules.
  • Atrabilin (at-rah-bil'-in). A preparation of suprarenal capsule; it is used in eye diseases.
  • Atrachelia (ah-trak-e' -le-ah) (d, priv.; xpaxykoc, the neck). Absence or exceeding shortness of the neck.
  • Atrachelocephalus (ah-trak-el-o-sef -al-us) (dx- paxyXoc, without a neck; tcefaXr), the head). 1. Affected with atrachelia. 2. A monster with no neck or an abnormally short one.
  • Atractenchyma (ah-trakt-en' -ki-mah) (axpanxoc, a spindle; ifX £CV > to P our m )- A tissue con- sisting of spindle-cells.
  • Atractoid (ah-trakt'-oid). Spindle-shaped.
  • Atremia (ah-tre'-me-ah) (d, priv.; xpkpecv, to tremble). 1. An absence of tremor. 2. In- ability to walk, stand, or sit without general discomfort and paresthesia of the head and back, all movements being readily executed in the recumbent posture. Syn., NefteVs disease.
  • Atresia (ah-tre' -ze-ah) (d, priv.; xpfjocc, per- foration). Imperforation of a normal open- ing or canal, as of the anus, vagina, meatus auditorius, pupil, etc.
  • Atresic (ah-tre'-zik) (see Atresia). Characterized by atresia.
  • Atreto- (ah-tre-to-) (axpyxoc, imperforate). A prefix meaning imperforate.
  • Atropinize (at'-ro-pin-iz) (atropin). To bring under the influence of, or to treat with, atropin.
  • Atroscin (at'-ros-in), C 17 H 21 N0 4 . An alkaloid isomeric with hyoscin, obtained from Scopolia carniolica. It has a higher rotatory power than hyoscin, and is from 2 to 4 times stronger in mydriatic action. Syn., Atrosia.
  • Attar (at'-ar) (Ar., 'itr, perfume). A general name for any of the volatile oils. A. of Rose, oil of rose. The volatile oil distilled from the fresh flowers of the Damascene rose. It comes mainly from eastern Rumelia, and is generally adulterated with other volatile oils. It is used as a perfume.
  • Attendant (at-en' -dani) (attendere, to attend). A nonprofessional attache of an asylum or hos- pital.
  • Attenuating (at-en' -u-a-ting) (see Attenuant). Making thin.
  • Attic (at'-ik) ('Attckoc, Attic). Part of the tympanic cavity situated above the atrium. A. Disease, chronic suppurative inflammation of the attic of the tympanum.
  • Atticoantrotomy (at-ik-o-an-trof -o-me) (attic; antrum; xe^vecv, to cut). The opening of the attic and mastoid process.
  • Atticomastoid (at-ik-o-mas f -toid) . Relating to the attic and the mastoid.
  • Atticotomy (at-ik-of -om-e) (attic; rkuvetv, to cut). Surgical incision of the attic.
  • Attollens (at-ol'-enz) (attollere, to rise up). Raising. A. auris, a muscle raising the external ear.
  • Attrahens (at' -ra-lienz) (L., "drawing"). Drawing forward, as attrahens aurem, a mus- cle drawing the ear forward and upward.
  • Attrition (at-rish' -un) (atterere, to rub against). Rubbing or friction.
  • Audiometer (aw-de-om' -et-er) (audire, to hear; (ikxpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring the acuteness of hearing.
  • Audiphone (aw'-dif-on) (audire, to hear; (fxovq, a sound). An instrument for improving the power of hearing by conveying sounds through the bones of the head to the labyrinth.
  • Augnathus (aw-gna f -thus) (ay, besides; yyadoc, the jaw). A monster with two lower jaws.
  • Aula (aw'-lah) (aoXrj, a hall or open court). The AURA 118 AURIST common mesal cavity of the cerebrum, it being also the anterior portion of the third ventricle.
  • Aurade, Auradin (aw'-rad, aw'-rad-in). A fatty body obtained from oil of orange-flowers. It crystallizes in tasteless, pearly, odorless scales, melting at 13 1° F.; soluble in water, insoluble in alcohol. Syn., Neroli camphor.
  • Aural (aw'-ral) (auris, the ear). 1. Relating to the ear or to hearing. 2. (aura.) Relating to the air or to an aura. A. Vertigo. See Meniere's Disease.
  • Auramin (aw' -ram-in) (aurum, gold; amin). Yellow pyoktanin, a yellow anilin color used to some extent as an antiseptic.
  • Aurantia (aw-ran 1 '-she-ah) (aurantium). 1. An orange coal-tar dye; an ammonium salt of hexa- nitrodiphenylamin. 2. An orange or oranges.
  • Aurantii, Tinctura (B. P.). Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc). Aurantii, Tinctura, recentis (B.
  • Aurantin (aw-ran' -tin). See Heptane.
  • Aurantium (aw-ran' -she-um) (L. ; gen., aurantii). Orange. The fruit of Citrus vulgaris and C.
  • Aureola (aw-re'-o-lah). See Areola (1).
  • Aureolin (aw-re'-o-lin) (aurum, gold). A yellow pigment obtained by heating paratoluidin with sulfur and treating with fuming sulfuric acid. Syn., Carnotin; Polychromin; Primulin yellow; Sid fin; Thiochromogen.
  • Auric (aw'-rik) (aurum, gold). Pertaining to aurum or gold. A. Acid. See Acid, Auric.
  • Auricoammonic (aw-rik-o-am-on'-ik). Con- taining gold and ammonium.
  • Auricobarytic (aw-rik-o-bar-it'-ik). Contain- ing gold and barium.
  • Auricular (aw-rik'-u-lar) (see Auricle). 1. Relating to the auricle of the ear. 2. Per- taining to the auricles of the heart, as auricu- lar appendix. 3. Relating to the auricular nerve, arteries, veins, etc. A. Finger, the little finger. A. Point, the central point of the external auricular meatus.
  • Auricularis (aw-rik-u-la'-ris) (see Auricle), 1. Auricular. 2. The extensor minimi digiti. See under Muscle. A. magnus, a branch of the cervical plexus of nerves.
  • Auriculo cranial (aw-rik-u-lo-kra'-ne-al). Per- taining to both the auricle and the cranium.
  • Auriculotemporal (aw -rik-u-lo - tem'-po -rat) » (auricle; tempus, the temple). Relating to the auricle and to the temporal re- gion. A. Nerve, a branch of the inferior maxillary, supplying superficial parts about the auricle and temple.
  • Auriculoventricular (aw-rik-u-lo-ven-trik'-u- lar) (auricle; ventricidus, the ventricle). Relating to an auricle and a ventricle of the heart. A. Opening, the opening between the auricles and the ventricles of the heart.
  • Auriginous (aw-rij'-in-ous). 1. Having the color of gold. 2. Relating to jaundice.
  • Aurinasal (aw-re-na'-sal) (auris; nasus, nose). Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
  • Auripuncture (aw'-re-punk-chur) (auris; punc- ture). Puncture of the membrana tympani.
  • Auris (aw'-ris) (L.). The ear.
  • Auriscope (aw'-ris-kop) (auris; okotzuv, to ex- amine). An instrument for examining the ear, and especially the eustachian passage; an otoscope.
  • Aurist (aw'-rist) (auris). A specialist in dis- eases of the ear.
  • Auscult, Auscultate (aws-kulf, aws' -kul-tat) (auscultare, to listen to). To perform or prac- tise auscultation; to examine by ausculta- tion.
  • Auscultatory (aws-kuV '-ta-to-re) (see Ausctdt). Relating to auscultation. A. Percussion, the practice of listening with the stethoscope to the sounds produced by percussing a part.
  • Autechoscope (aw-tek'-o-skop) (auxoc, self; 7?£oc, sound; oKoize'tv, to inspect). A device for enabling a person to listen to sounds pro- duced within his own body.
  • Autecious, Autcecious (aw-te' '-sluis) (auxoc, self; oIkoc, dwelling). Applied to parasitic fungi that pass through all the stages of their existence in the same host.
  • Autemesia (aw-tem-e' -zhe-ah) (auxoc, self; ifielv, to vomit). Vomiting without manifest cause.* Auto- (aw-to-) (auxoc, self). A prefix meaning self, of itself.
  • Auto immunization (aw-to-im-u-ni-za' -shun) (aido-; immunization). Immunization obtained by natural processes at work within the body.
  • Autoaudible (aw-to-awd'-i-U) (auto-; audire, to hear). Applied to cardiac sounds audible to the patient.
  • Autoblast (aw'-to-blast) (auto-; fiXaoxoc, a. germ). An independent bioblast.
  • Autochthon (aw-tok'-thon) (auxoydojv, sprung from the land). An aboriginal inhabitant.
  • Autochthonous (aw-tok'-thon-us) (see Autoch- thon). Aboriginal; formed (as, e. g., a clot) in the place where it is found. Autocmesis(aw'-to-sin-e'-sis). See Autokinesis.
  • Autocinetic (aw-to-sin-et'-ik). See Autokinetic.
  • Autoclave (aw' -to-kldv) (auto-; clavis, a key). 1. Self -fastening; closing itself. 2. An appa- ratus for sterilizing objects by steam-heat at high pressure.
  • Autoconduction (aw-to-kon-duk'-shun) (auto-; conduction). A term used in electrotherapy for a method of using high-frequency cur- rents, by having the patient or part to be acted upon placed inside of the solenoid, with- out any direct connection with any part of the circuit.
  • Autocystoplasty (aw -to -sis' ' -to-plas-te) (auto-; Kuoxcc, bladder; xXaooecv, to form). Plas- tic surgery of the bladder with grafts from the patient's body.
  • Autocytotoxins (aw-to-si-to-toks'-ins) (auto-; cytotoxin). Cytotoxins produced in the body of the individual by abnormal retention and absorption of the products of degenerated and dead cells.
  • Autodidact (aw r -to-di-dakt) (auto-; dcda/cxdc, taught). One who is self-taught in his profession.
  • Autodigestion (aw-to-di-jes' -chun) (aido-; digere, to digest). Digestion of an organ by its own secretion.
  • Autogenesis (aw-to-jen'-es-is) (auto-; ykv- eotc, production. Spontaneous generation; self -production.
  • Autogenetic (aw-to-jen-ef -ik) (see Autogen- esis). Produced within the organism.
  • Autogony (aw-tog'-o-ne) (auxoyovoc, self-pro- duced). The rise of the simplest protoplasmic substance in a formative fluid.
  • Autographism (aw'-to-graf-izm) (auto-; fpacf)- ecv, to write). Dermographia. See Urticaria factitia.
  • Autohypnotism (aw-to-hip' -not-izm) (auto-; u-voc, sleep). Mental stupor induced by dwell- ing intensely upon some all-absorbing thought.
  • Autoinfection (aw-to-in-fek'-shun) (auto-; in- fection). Infection by virus originating within the body or transferred from one part of the body to another.
  • Autoinfusion (aw-to-in-fu'-shun) (auto-; in- fundere, to pour in). Compulsion of the blood to the heart by bandaging the extrem- ities, compression of the abdominal aorta, etc.
  • Autoinoculable (aw-to -in-ok f -u-la-bl) (auto-; inoculare, to implant). Capable of being in- oculated upon the person already infected. Chancroid is autoinoculable.
  • Autoinoculation (aw-to-in-ok-u-td'-shun) (see Autoinoculable). Inoculation in one part of the body by virus present in another part; self-inoculation.
  • Autoisolysin (aw-to-is-oV -is-in) (auto-; 'hoc, equal; Xuacc, a loosing). A serum which dissolves the corpuscles of the individual from which it was obtained and also those of another individual of the same species.
  • Autokinesis (aw -to -kins' -sis) (auto-; tdvt)ctc, movement). Voluntary movement.
  • Autokinetic (aw-to-kin-ef -ik) (see Autokinesis). Pertaining to, or of the nature of, auto- kinesis.
  • Autolysin (aw!-to-li-sin) (auto-; Xuocg, a loosing). A lysin capable of dissolving the red blood-corpuscles of the animal in the serum of which it circulates.
  • Automatic (aw -to -mat' -ik) (auxopiaxc^ecv, to act spontaneously). Performed without the in- fluence of the will.
  • Automatism (aw-tom' -at-izm) (see Automatic). The performance of acts without apparent volition, as seen in certain somnambulists and in some hysteric and epileptic patients. A., Epileptic. See Automatism.
  • Automaton (aw-tom' -at-on) (auxoptaxoc, spon- taneous). One who acts in an involuntary or mechanic manner.
  • Autonomous (aw -ton' -om -us) (auto-; vbjioc, law). Self -ruled; independent.
  • Autonomy (aw -ton' -0 -me) (see Autonomous). Independence.
  • Autopepsia (aw-to-pep' -se-ah) (auto-; xbzxecv, to digest). Autodigestion.
  • Autophagia (aw-to-fa' -je-ah) (auto-; fyayftv, to eat). Self -consumption; emaciation.
  • Autophagy (aw-tof'-a-je). See Autophagia.
  • Autophobia (aw -to -fo' -be -ah) (auto-; cj>6fioc, fear). A morbid dread of one's self or of solitude.
  • Autophonous (aw-to' -on-us) (auto-; (j>ojvq, voice). Having the character of autoph- ony.
  • Autophony (aw-to' -o-ne) (see Autophonous). 1. The auscultation of the physician's own voice through the patient's chest. 2. The condition in which one's own voice appears changed. It may be due to chronic inflam- mation of the ear or to other causes.
  • Autophthalmoscopy (aw-to f-thal-mos'-ko-pe) (auto-; 6(pdaX/x6c, the eye; okotze'iv, to see). Examination of one's own eye with the oph- thalmoscope.
  • Autoplasty (aw'-to-plas-te) (auto-; Tilaoazcv, to form). A method of repairing the effects of a wound or lesion involving loss of tissue by grafting or implanting fresh parts taken from other portions of the patient's body.
  • Autopsy chorrhythmia (aw-to-si-kor-rith' -me- an) (auto-; (pu^T), mind; pudp.dc, rhythm). A morbid rhythmic activity of the brain; it is a symptom of grave insanity.
  • Autopsy (aw'-top-se) (auto-; oipcc, a see- ing). The postmortem examination.
  • Autoscope (aw'-to-skop) (auto-; okotzcIv, to see). An instrument arranged for the exam- ination of one's own organs by one's self.
  • Autoscopy (aw-tos' -ko-pe) (see Autoscope). The examination of one's own organs by means of an autoscope.
  • Autosite (aw'-to-slt) (auto-; o'cxoc, food). 1. A monster capable of an independent ex- istence after birth. 2. That member of a double fetal monstrosity that nourishes itself by its own organs and also the other member, which is called the parasite.
  • Autositic (aw -to -sit' -ik) (see Autosite). Of the nature of an autosite.
  • Autosterilization (aw-to-ster-il-iz-a'-shun) (au- to-; sterilization). Sterilization effected by the normal fluids of the body.
  • Autostethoscope (aw-to-steth' -o-skop) (auto-; oxfjdoc, the breast; anone'iv, to examine). A stethoscope so arranged that by it one may listen to his own chest-sounds.
  • Autotherapy (aw-to-iher' -a-pe) (auto-; Oepa- Tieca, treatment). The spontaneous or self- cure of a disease.
  • Autotoxemia (aw-to-toks-e' -me-ah) (auto-; to$(kov, a poison; alpa, blood). Toxe- mia from poisons derived from the organism itself.
  • Autotoxin (aw-to-toks' -in) (auto-; xo^cubv, a poison). Any poisonous product of tissue- metamorphosis.
  • Autotyphization (aw-to-ti-fiz-a' -shun) (auto-; typhoid). The production of a condition resembling typhoid fever from faulty elimina- tion of waste-material.
  • Autovaccination (aw-to-vaks-in-a' 'shun) (auto-; vaccinare, to vaccinate). The reinsertion of fresh vaccine lymph upon the same person from whom it is taken. Autumn Catarrh. Synonym of Hay-fever, since it occurs in August and the fall of the year.
  • Autumnal (aw-tum' -nal) (autumn). Pertaining to the fall of the year. A. Fever. Synonym of Typhoid fever.
  • Auxanometer (awks-an-om' -et-er) (au^avetv, to grow; fxhpov, a measure). An instrument used in biologic study for measuring the growth of young organisms.
  • Auxiliary (awks-iV -e-a-re) (auxilium). r. Aid- ing. 2. An adjuvant. Auxiliaries of Res- piration, those muscles brought into action in difficult respiration.
  • Auxilium (awks-iV -e-um) (L., "help"). A wheeled vehicle or ambulance with couch and mattresses, for use in the service of field military hospitals.
  • Avalvular (ah-vaV -vu-lar) (a, priv.; valvula, ■ a valve). Lacking valves.
  • Avascular (ah-vas' '-ku-lar) (a, priv.; vas, a ves- sel). Without blood; not possessing blood- vessels. Avellis* Symptom-complex. Paralysis of one-half of the soft palate, associated with a recurrent paralysis on the same side.
  • Avenin (av-e'-nin) (avena). 1. A precipi- tate made from a tincture of Avena sativa, or the oat. It is a nerve -stimulant and tonic. Unof. 2. A nitrogenous principle obtained from the oat, and nearly identical with legu- min; the gluten-casein of oats.
  • Avenious, Avenous (ah-ve'-ne-us, ah-ve' -nus) (a, priv.; vena, vein). Lacking veins or nerves.
  • Avenolith (av-en' -o-lith) (avena; X'cdoc, stone). An intestinal calculus formed around a grain of oat.
  • Aversion (av-ur' -shun) (avertere, to turn aside). 1. A turning aside, as in the displacement of an organ or in metastasis. 2. Nausea. Avogadro's Law. Equal volumes of all gases and vapors, at like temperature and pressure, contain an equal number of molecules.
  • Avoirdupois Weight (av -or -du- pots'). See Weights and Measures.
  • Axanthopsia (ah-zan-thop'-se-ah) (a, priv.; £avdoc, yellow; bipcc, vision). Yellow-blind- ness.
  • Axial (aks'-e-al) (axis). Pertaining to or sit- uated in an axis. A. Current, the column of red corpuscles which, by reason of the weight of the cells, occupies the center or axis of the blood-stream. A. Hyperopia. See Hyperopia, Axial. A. Stream. See A. Current.
  • Axilemma (aks-il-em'-ah) (axis; Aifi/Jia, husk; skin). An elastic sheath composed of neuro- keratin, inclosing the axis-cylinder of medul- lated nerve -fibers.
  • Axilla (aks-il'-ah) (L.). The armpit.
  • Axite (aks'-lt) (axis). Gowers' name for the terminal filaments of the axis-cylinder.
  • Axo- (aks-o-) (axis). A prefix meaning axis.
  • Axodendrite (aks-o-den' -drlt) (axo-; devdpov, a tree). Lenhossek's term for a nonmedullated, axopetally conducting side fibril on the axons, as distinguished from a cytodendrite or one of the true medullated, cellulifugal collaterals.
  • Axoid (aks r -oid) (axo-, stdoc, likeness). 1. Shaped like a pivot. 2. Relating to the second cervical vertebra.
  • Axon, Axone (aks'-on) (axis). 1. The body- axis. 2. An unbranched nerve-cell pro- cess of the second order. 3. The cerebro- spinal axis. 4. Kolliker's term for neurite.
  • Axoneuron (aks-o -nu' -r on) (axo-; veupov, nerve). A neuron the cell-body (nerve-cell) of which lies in the interior of the brain or the spinal cord. The axoneurons are classified as rhizoneurons and the endaxoneurons.
  • Axonometer (aks-o-nom' '-et-er) (axo-; jikrpov, a measure). 1. An instrument used for locat- ing the axis of astigmatism. 2. An apparatus for determining the axis of a cylinder.
  • Axungia (aks-un' -je-ah) (L.). Fat; lard; adeps. Axungiae lunae, a variety of calcium carbonate. Axungiae vitri, salt of glass; a scum forming on the surface of molten glass. It is applied as a desiccative and detergent.
  • Azalein (az-a f -le-in). Same as Rosanilin.
  • Azerin (az'-er-in) (a, priv.; $r)poc, dry). A fer- j ment analogous to ptyalin and found in the digestive secretions of Drosera, Nepenthes, and probably all other insectivorous plants.
  • Azo-compounds. In chemistry, compounds intermediate between the nitro-compounds and the amido-compounds, and made from the former by partial reduction, or from the latter by partial oxidation.
  • Azoamyly (ah-zo-am! -il-e) (a, priv.; £tiov, ani- mal; ap.uXov, starch). The inability of the cell (hepatic) to store up the normal amount of glycogen.
  • Azobenzoid (az-o-ben' -zo-id) f An amorphous white powder derived from oil of bitter almonds by action of ammonia.
  • C. Seed, Tincture of (tinctura cplchici seminis, U. S. P.), 10% strength. Dose 10-30 min. (0.6-2.0 Cc). C. Seed, Wine of (vinum col- chici seminis, U. S. P.), 10 % in strength. Dose 10-30 min. (0.6-2.0 Cc).
  • Canthotomy (kan-thof -o-me) (canthus; to/xtj, a cutting). Surgical division of a can- thus.
  • Canthus (kan'-thus) (KavOog, canthus). The angle formed by the junction of the eye- lids.
  • Canula (kan'-u-lah). See Cannula.
  • Cap (kap) (AS., cappe). 1. See Tegmentum. 2. The tissue covering the conic end of a lymph -follicle. C, Enamel, the concave enamel-organ covering the top of the growing tooth -papilla. C, Nuclear, a collection of chromophilic substance on one side of the nucleus of a cell.
  • Capillaraneurysm (kap-il-ar-an' -u-rizm) (cap- illus; aveupuopta, a widening). Excessive cap- illarectasia.
  • Capillarectasia (kap-il-ar-ek-ta'-ze-ah) (capil- lus; enraocc, a stretching -out). Dilation of the capillaries.
  • Capillarity (kap-il-ar'-it-e) (capillary). 1. Cap- illary attraction; the force that causes fluids to rise in fine tubes or bores. 2. The con- dition of being capillary.
  • Capillitium (kap-il-ish' -e-um) (L.). The hair of the head, or the portion of the scalp thus covered.
  • Capillose (kap'-il-oz) (capillosus). Hairy.
  • Capistration (kap-is-tra'-shun). See Phimosis; also Trismus.
  • Capistrum (kap-is'-trum) (L., "a muzzle or halter"; pi., capistra). 1. A bandage for the head or lower jaw. Syn., Capelina. 2. Trismus.
  • Capital (kap'-it-al) (caput). 1. Pertaining to the head, or to the summit of a body or object. 2. Of great importance, as a capital operation in surgery.
  • Capitatum (kap -it-a' -turn). The large bone of the carpus, the os magnum.
  • Capitellum (kap -it-el' -um) (dim. of caput). The rounded, external surface of the lower end of the humerus.
  • Capitium (kap-e'-she-um) (L.). A bandage for the head; it may be triangular or four- cornered. C. magnum, C. quadrangulare, C. quadratum, a four-cornered head band- age. C. minus, C. triangulare, a three- cornered head bandage.
  • Capitones (kap' -it-on-ez) (L.). Fetuses with heads too large for unassisted delivery.
  • Capitulum (kap-if '-u-lum) (L., "a small head"). A little head. C. of Santorini, a small elevation on the apex of the arytenoid cartilage, corresponding in position to the posterior extremity of the vocal band.
  • Capnomor (kap' '-no-mor) (nanvoc, smoke; (io"cpa, a part), C 20 H 22 O 2 . A transparent, colorless, oily fluid, a constituent of smoke obtained from the heavy oil of tar. It dissolves caoutchouc.
  • Caprate (kap' -rat). A salt of capric acid.
  • Capric (kap'-rik) (capra, a goat). Relating or belonging to, or having the odor of, a goat. C. Acid. See Acid, Capric.
  • Caprin (kap'-rin) (see Capric). An oily and flavoring constituent of butter; glycerol caprate.
  • Caprinate (kap'-rin-at). See Caprate.
  • Caprinic (kap-rin'-ik). See Capric.
  • Caprizant (kap f -ri-zant) (see Capric). Leap- ing; of irregular motion, applied to the pulse.
  • Caproate (kap'-ro-at). A salt of normal caproic acid.
  • Caproic (kap-ro'-ik). See Capric. C. Acid. See Acid, Caproic. C. Anhydrid, C 12 H 22 3 , a neutral oily liquid.
  • Caproin (kap'-ro-in). A fat, resembling caprin, found in goat's butter.
  • Caprone (kap' -r on) (see Capric), C n H 22 0. Caproic ketone; a clear, volatile oil found in butter, and forming the larger part of the oil of rue.
  • Caproyl (kap'-ro-il). 1. C 6 H n O. A hypo- thetic radicle. Syn., radicle. Syn., Hexyl.
  • Caproylamin (kap-ro-W -am-in) (caproyl; amin), C 6 H 15 N. Hexylamin. A ptomain formed in the putrefaction of yeast.
  • Caprylic Acid (kap-ril'-ik). See Acid, Caprylic.
  • Capsaicin (kap-sa'-is-in). See Capsicin.
  • Capsicol (kap'-sik-ol) (capsicum; oleum, oil). A red oil obtainable from the oleoresin of capsicum.
  • Capsitis (kap-si'-tis). Same as Capsulitis.
  • Capsotomy (hap -sot' -o -me). See Capsulotomy.
  • Capsula (kap r -su-lah) (L., "a small box"), i. The interna) capsule of the brain; it is the thick layer of fibers between the caudatum and thalamus mesad and the lenticula laterad; it is continuous with the crura caudad, and its expansion is called the corona. 2. See Capsule.
  • Capsular (kap' -su-lar) (capsule). Pertaining to a capsule. C. Cataract, an opacity of the capsule of the crystalline lens. C. Hemi- plegia, a hemiplegia due to a lesion in the internal capsule.
  • Capsulation (kap-su-la' -shun) (capsule). The act or process of inclosing in capsules.
  • Capsulitis (kap-su-li'-tis) (capsule; tree;, in- flammation). Inflammation of the capsule of the lens or of the fibrous capsule of the eyeball.
  • Capsulolenticular (kap-su-lo-len-tik' -u-lar) (capsule; lenticula, a lentil). Relating to the lens and to its capsule.
  • Capsulotome (kap' -su-lo -torn). 1. See Cysto- tome. 2. An instrument used by Buller in capsulotomy to steady the capsule; it consists of two fine needles fixed parallel to each other in a handle.
  • Capsulotomy (kap -su- lot'- o - me) (capsule ; xkfiVBCv, to cut). The operation of rupturing the capsule of the crystalline lens in cata- ract-operations.
  • Captation (kap -ta' -shun) (captare, to desire). The first or opening stage of the hypnotic trance.
  • Captol (kap'-tol). A product of the condensa- tion of tannin and chloral; it is used in to 2 % solution as an antiseborrheal agent and lotion for the hair. Syn., Tannochloral.
  • Caramel, (kar' '-am-el) (Fr., " burnt sugar"). Cane-sugar deprived of two molecules of water. It is a viscid, brown-colored liquid.
  • Carapin (kar'-ap-in). An alkaloid from the bark of Carapa guianensis.
  • Caraway (kar'-ah-wd). See Carum.
  • Carbamate (kar'-bam-dt). A salt of carbamic acid.
  • Carbamic (kar-bam'-ik). Obtained from car- bamid. C.Acid. See Acid, Carbamic.
  • Carbamid (kar' -bam-id) (carbo, a coal; amid), CH 4 N 2 0. Urea.
  • Carbamin (kar -bam' -in). See Acetonitril.
  • Carbazotic Acid (kar-baz-ol'-ik). See Acid, Picric.
  • Carbid (kar' -bid). A compound formed by the direct union of carbon with some radicle or element.
  • Carbimids (kar'-bim-idz). Bodies isomeric with cyanates, but distinguished from true cyanates in that alkalis decompose them into carbon dioxid and amin. Syn., Carbonyl- amins.
  • Carbinol (kar'-bin-ol) (carbo). Methyl-alcohol, CH3OH. Also a generic term for the alcohols formed by substituting hydrocar- bon radicles for the hydrogen in the methyl radicle of carbinol.
  • Carboformal (kar-bo-form' -at) . A combination of carbon and paraformaldehyd in the form of blocks (Gluh blocks) for purposes of i7 disinfection, the formaldehyd being liberated by the burning of the carbon.
  • Carbohemia (kar -bo-he' -me-ah) (carbo; al/xa, blood). Imperfect oxidation of the blood.
  • Carbohydric (kar -bo-hi' -drik). Containing car- bon, hydrogen, and oxygen.
  • Carbolate (kar'-bol-dt). 1. A salt of phenol. 2. To impregnate with phenol.
  • Carbolfuchsin (kar-bol-jook'-sin) (carbo; fuch- sin). A staining fluid consisting of go parts of a 5 % aqueous solution of phenol and 1 part of fuchsin dissolved in 10 parts of alcohol.
  • Carbolic (kar-bol'-ik) (carbo; oleum, oil). Con- taining or derived from coal-tar oil. C. Acid. See Acid, Carbolic, and Phenol.
  • Carbolism (kar'-bol-izm) (see Carbolic). Phe- nol poisoning; a diseased state induced by the misuse or maladministration of phenol. C, Cutaneous, dry gangrene due to the action of liquid phenol or to prolonged application of a solution of it upon the skin.
  • Carbolize (kar'-bol-iz) (see Carbolic), To im- pregnate with phenol.
  • Carbolmarasmus (kar-bol-mar-az'-mus) (car- bolic; fjto.paop.de, decay). Chronic carbolism: a condition marked by vomiting, vertigo, head- ache, salivation, nephritis, and general ma- rasmus.
  • Carbolxylene (kar-bol-zi'-lcn). A clearing mixture composed of phenol, 1 part, and xylene, 3 parts; used for clearing micro- scopic sections which are to be mounted in Canada balsam or other resinous medium.
  • Carbonated (kar'-bo-na-ted). i. Containing carbonic acid. 2. Changed into a carbonate.
  • Carbone (kar'-bon). A carbuncle.
  • Carbonemia (Jzar-bon-e' -me-ah) (carbo; alp.a, blood). An accumulation of carbon dioxid in the blood.
  • Carboneum (kar-bon'-e-um). Carbon.
  • Carbonic (kar-bon'-ik). Relating to, obtained from, or containing carbon. C. Acid. See Carbon Dioxid. C. Anhydrid, carbon dioxid. C. Snow, carbon dioxid in crystal form.
  • Carbonid (kar f -bon-id). 1. See Carbid. 2. A mineral which contains carbon. 3. An oxa- late freed from its hydrogen by heat.
  • Carbonite (kar'-bon-it). An oxalate.
  • Carbonization (kar -bon-iz-a' -shun) (carbon). The process of decomposing organic sub- stances by heat without air, until the volatile products are driven off and the carbon re- mains.
  • Carbonometer (kar - bon - om'- et - er) (carbon; fikxpov, a measure). An apparatus for in- dicating the degree to which the air of a room is vitiated by carbon dioxid.
  • Carbonometry (kar-bon-om'-et-re). The de- termination of the amount of carbon dioxid exhaled in the breath.
  • Carbonous (kar'-bon-us). Containing carbon. Carbonyl (kar' -bon-il) (carbon). A hypothetic organic radicle having the formula OO.
  • Carbonylamins (kar -bon-il' -am-ins). See Car- bimids.
  • Carbosapol (kar-bo-sa'-pol) (carbo; sapo, soap). A clear disinfectant solution obtained by warming together phenol, 50 parts; yellow soda-soap, 25 parts; and soft potash-soap, 25 parts.
  • Carbosulfid, Carbosulfuret (kar-bo-sul f -fid, -jur-et). A compound of carbon and sulfur with a radicle.
  • Carbothialdin (kar-bo-thi-aV -din), C 6 H 10 N 2 S 2 . White crystals obtained on evaporating carbon sulfid with an alcoholic solution of aldehyd ammonia. It is soluble in acids.
  • Carbovinate (kar-bo-vin'-dt). An ethyl car- bonate.
  • Carboxyhemoglobin (kar- boks -e- hem - o -glo'- bin) (carboxyl; hemoglobin). The compound of carbon monoxid and hemoglobin formed when CO is present in the blood. The carbon monoxid displaces the oxygen and checks the respiratory function of the red corpuscles.
  • Carboxyl (kar-boks'-il) (carbo; o^uc, sharp). 1. The group, CO . OH, characteristic of the organic acids. The hydrogen of this can be replaced by metals, forming salts. 2. Same as Carbonyl.
  • Carboy (kar'-boi) (Turk., karaboya). A large bottle protected by wickerwork and a wooden box, used in the transportation of corrosive and other liquids.
  • Carbuncle (kar' -bung-kl) (carbo). A hard, cir- cumscribed, deep-seated, painful suppurative inflammation of the subcutaneous tissue. It differs from a boil in being of greater size, having a flat top, and several points of sup- puration. It is erroneously called anthrax.
  • Carcinelcosis (kar-sin-el-ko' '-sis) (napa'cvo^, a crab; 'iXncoocc, ulceration). A cancerous ulcer. C. fungosa. See Cancer verrucosus.
  • Carcinomatosis (kar-sin-o-mat-o'-sis). The pathologic condition giving rise to carcinomas.
  • Carcinomatous (kar-sin-o' -mat-us) (carcin- oma). Relating to or affected with carcin- oma.
  • Carcinomelcosis (kar-sin-om-el-ko'-sis). See Carcinelcosis.
  • Carcinomium (kar-sin-o' -me-um). Cancerous pus.
  • Carcinopolypus (kar-sin-o-pol'-e-pus). A can- cerous polyp.
  • Carcinous (kar'-sin-us). Cancerous.
  • Cardia (kar'-de-ah). The heart. C. of the Stomach, the esophageal orifice of the stom- ach.
  • Cardialgia (kar-de-al'-je-ah) (cardia; aXyoc, pain). Pain in the region of the heart, usually due to gaseous distention of the stomach; heartburn. Syn., Morbus cardia- cus; Morsus stomachi; Morsus ventriculi. C. icterica, heartburn with jaundice. C. inflammatoria, gastritis. C. sputatoria, pyrosis.
  • Cardianesthesia (kar -de -an-es - the' - ze - ah) (cardia; dvacodrja'ca, want of feeling). A condition of the heart marked by lack of sensation.
  • Cardianeurysma (kar-de-an-u-riz'-mah) (cardia; dveupuo/xa, a widening). Aneurysm of the heart.
  • Cardiant (kar' -de -ant) (cardia). 1. Affecting the heart. 2. A remedy that affects the heart.
  • Cardiaortic (kar-de-ah-or'-tik). Relating to the heart and the aorta.
  • Cardiaplegia (kar-de-ah-ple'-je-ah). See Cardio- plegia.
  • Cardiasthenia (kar-de-as-the' -ne-ah) (cardia; dodiveca, weakness). A peculiar weakness of the heart due to neurasthenic condi- tions.
  • Cardielcosis (kar -de-el -ko' -sis) (cardia; ZXkojo'.c, ulceration). Ulceration of the heart, CARDIETHMOLIPOSIS 244 CARDIOTROPHE Cardiethmoliposis (kar-de-eth -mo-lip -o' -sis) (cardia; Tjfyioc, a sieve; X'cnoc, fat). A deposit of fat in the connective tissue of the heart.
  • Cardinal (kar' -din-al) (cardo, a hinge). Im- portant; preeminent. C. -flower, a common name for several species of Lobelia, chiefly Lobelia cardinalis. C. Points of Capuron. See Capuron' s Cardinal Points. C. Veins, the venous trunks which, in the embryonic stage, form the primitive jugular veins.
  • Cardine (kar' -den). A fluid preparation of sheep-hearts digested in glycerol and boric acid, used subcutaneously as a heart- tonic and diuretic. Dose 50 min.-i^ dr. (3-5 Cc).
  • Cardio- (kar-de-o-) (cardia). A prefix meaning relating to the heart.
  • Cardioaccelerator (kar-de -o-ak-sel' -er-a- tor). Hastening the action of the heart. C. Center. See Center, Cardioaccelerator .
  • Cardioarterial (kar-de-o-ar-te f -re-al). Pertain- ing to the heart and the arteries.
  • Cardiocele (kar' -de -o -set) (cardio-; ktjXt), hernia). Hernia of the heart. C. abdominalis, hernial protrusion of the heart into the abdomen.
  • Cardiocentesis (kar-de-o-sen-te'-sis) (cardio-; nkvT'qotc', puncture). Puncture of one of the chambers of the heart to relieve engorgement.
  • Cardiodynia (kar-de-o-din'-e-ah) (cardio-; oduvr), pain). Pain in or about the heart.
  • Cardiodysesthesia, Cardiodysesthesis (kar- de-o-dis-es-the' -ze-ah, -sis) (cardia; dug, bad; a'coOyocg, perception). Defective innervation of the heart.
  • Cardiodysneuria (kar-de-o-dis-nu'-re-ah). See Cardiodysesthesia.
  • Cardiogram (kar' -de-o -gram) (cardio-; ypa/x/ia, a writing). The tracing of the cardiac im- pulse made by the cardiograph.
  • Cardiograph (kar'-de-o-graf) (cardia; ypafetv, to write). An instrument for registering graphically the modifications of the pulsa- tions of the heart.
  • Cardiographer (kar-de-og'-ra-fer) (see Cardio- graph). An authority upon diseases of the heart.
  • Cardioid (kar'-de-oid) (cardio-; eldog, likeness). Like a heart.
  • Cardioinhibitory (kar-de-o-in-hib' -it-o-re) (car- dio-; inhibere, to restrain). Inhibiting or diminishing the heart's action. The cardio- inhibitory fibers pass to the heart through the pneumogastric nerves.
  • Cardiology (kar-de-ol'-o-je) (cardio-; Xoyog, discourse). The anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the heart.
  • Carposid (kar f -po-sid). A crystalline glucosid from Carica papaya.
  • Carpozyma (kar-po-zi'-mah) (Kaprcbc, fruit; Cp\n), ferment). A genus of microorganisms producing fermentation.
  • Carpus (kar'-pus) (L.). The eight bones collec- tively forming the wrist.
  • Carrageen, Carragheen (kar r -ag-en) (Carrag- heen in Ireland). Irish moss. See Chondrus.
  • Carron Oil (kar f -on). See Oil, Carron.
  • Cartilaginous (kar-til-af -in-us) (cartilage). Made up of or resembling cartilage.
  • Cartilago (kar-til-a'-go) (L.). See Cartilage. C. triticea, a small oblong cartilaginous nodule often found in the lateral thyrohyoid ligament.
  • Carunculate, Carunculated (kar-ung'-ku-lat, -ed). Furnished with a caruncle.
  • Caryin (kar'-e-in). See under Carya.
  • Caryinum (kar-e-in'-um). Nut-oil.
  • Caryochrome (kar'-e-o-krom). See Karyo- chrome.
  • Caryocinesis (kar-e-o-sin-e'-sis). See Karyo- kinesis.
  • Caryocinetic (kar-e-o-sin-ef-ik). 1. See Karyo- kinetic. 2. Ameboid.
  • Caryolysis (kar-e-ol'-is-is). See Karyolysis.
  • Caryomitosis (kar-e-o-mi-to'-sis). See Karyo- mitosis.
  • Caryoplasm (kar' -e-o-plazm) See Karyoplasm.
  • Casanthrol (kas-an'-throl). ' A mixture of casein ointment with a coal-tar product; it is used as a varnish in skin diseases.
  • Cascarillin (kas-kar-il'-in) (cascarilla), C 6 H 9 2 . The active principle of cascarilla; a white, crystalline, bitter substance, scarcely soluble in water.
  • Casease (ka'-se-az). An enzym which digests casein, found by Duclaux and produced by bacteria, notably Tyrothrix tenuis.
  • Caseate (ka'-ze-at). 1. A lactate. 2. To undergo cheesy degeneration.
  • Caseation (ka-ze-a r -shun) (casein). The pre- cipitation of casein during the coagulation of milk. Also a form of degeneration in which the structure is converted into a soft, cheese- like substance.
  • Caseiform (ka'-ze-if-orm). Resembling cheese or casein.
  • Caseoiodin (ka-ze-o-i 1 '-o-din) . A compound of casein and iodin (S or 9 %) forming a white powder, soluble in dilute hot alcohol and in hot alkalis. It is used in myxedema.
  • Caseous (ka'-ze-us) (caseum). Having the nature or consistence of cheese.
  • Castor (kas'-tor). See Castoreum. C.-bean, C.-oil. See under Ricinus. C. -xylene, a mixture composed of castor-oil, 1 part, and xylene, 3 parts, used for clearing or clarify- ing the collodion or celloidin of objects embedded in collodion.
  • Castoreum (kas-to' -re-um) (naozcop, the beaver). The dried preputial follicles and their secretion, obtained from the beaver, Castor fiber. It is a reddish-brown substance with a strong odor. It is antispasmodic and stimulant, its action resembling that of musk. Dose of the tincture J-i dr. (2-4 Cc).
  • Castration (kas-tra f -shun) (castrare, to cut). Orchidectomy; the excision of one or both testicles. C, Female, removal of the ova- ries; oophorectomy; spaying.
  • Castrensis (kas-tren' -sis) (castra, a camp). 1. Relating to camps. 2. Camp-fever or dysen- tery due to unsanitary living in camps.
  • Casualty (kaz f -u-al-te) (casus, chance). An accidental injury; a wound, or loss of life, accidentally incurred; an injury in a battle.
  • Casuistics (kaz-u-is'-tiks) (casus, a case). The study of individual pathologic cases as a means of arriving at the general history of a disease.
  • Casumen (kas f -u-men). A proprietary dietetic said to contain 93 % of proteid.
  • Cat-head (kat'-hed). A term applied by Rosch to certain skulls the bones of which are too thin, the form rotund, with the occiput markedly projecting, while all prominences and muscular impressions are inconspicuous. Cf. Apple Head.
  • Catabasial (kat-ah-ba' -se-al) (/card, down; basion). Applied to skulls having the basion lower than the opisthion.
  • Catabasis (kat-ab' -as -is) (mrapaotc, a descent). The decline of a disease.
  • Catabiotic (kat-ah-bi-ot'-ik). See Katabiotic.
  • Catabolergy (kat-ab-ol'-er-je). See Katabol- ergy.
  • Catabolic (kat-ab -ol'-ik). See Katabolic.
  • Catabolin, Catabolite (kat-ab' '-o-lin, -lite). See Katabolin.
  • Catabolism (kat-ab' -o-lizm). See Katabolism.
  • Cataclasis (kat-ak' -las-is) (Kara, down; nXaoecv, to break). A fracture.
  • Catacleisis (kat-ak-W -sis) (Karaidecocc, a lock- ing). Closure of the eyelids by adhesion or by spasm.
  • Cataclysm (kaf '-ak-lizm) (KaraKXuo/xoc, a del- uge). 1. An effusion. 2. A sudden shock.
  • Cataleptic (kat-al-ep'-tik) (see Catalepsy). 1. Relating to, affected with, or of the nature of, catalepsy. 2. A person affected with cata- lepsy.
  • Cataleptiform (kat-al-ep'-tif-orm) (catalepsy; forma, form). Resembling catalepsy.
  • Cataleptize (kat-al-ep'-tlz). To reduce to a state of catalepsy.
  • Cataleptoid (kat-al-ep' -toid) (catalepsy; eldoc, likeness). Like catalepsy. C. State, a condition due to neuromuscular excitability and differing from true catalepsy in that the limbs must be held in fixed attitudes for a few seconds before they maintain themselves and friction causes them to become limp.
  • Cataleptolethargic (kat-al-ep-to-leth-ar' '-jik) . Having the nature of catalepsy and lethargy.
  • Catamenia (kat-am-e' -ne-ah) (Kara, concerning, according to; firjv, month). The recurrent monthly discharge of blood during sexual life from the genital canal of the female.
  • Catamenial (kat-am-e 1 '-ne-al) (catamenia). Per- taining to the catamenia.
  • Cataphonics (kat-ah-fon'-iks) (Kara, after; cfxbvr), sound). That branch of physics treating of reflected sounds.
  • Cataphoria (kat-af-o'-re-ah). See Kataphoria.
  • Cataplasis (kat-ap'-las-is) (Kara, down; itlaatc, formation). 1. The stage of decline in the individual life. 2. The application of a plaster or coating.
  • Cataractous (kal-ar-ak'-tus) (cataract). Of the nature of or affected with cataract.
  • Catarrhal (kat-ahr'-al) (catarrh). Of the nature of, affected with, or relating to catarrh. C. Fever. Synonym of Influenza. C. Inflam- mation, an inflammation of an archiblastic surface, characterized by proliferation and desquamation of the epithelium.
  • Catarrhectic (kat-ar-ek'-tik) (Karapprj/iracoc). Purgative.
  • Catatonia (kat-at-o'-ne-ah). See Katatonia.
  • Catatropia (kat-at-ro' -pe-ah) . See Katatropia.
  • Catavertebral (kat-ah-ver 1 '-te-bral) (Kara, down; vertebral). Located on the side of a centrum of a vertebra next to the blood-vessels.
  • Catechin (kat'-e-chin) (catechu), C 21 H 20 O 9 + 5H 2 0. Catechinic acid, the active principle of catechu. It crystallizes in shining needles of a snow-white, silky appearance.
  • Catechol (kaf '-e-chol) . See Pyrocatechin. C. Dimethylate, C. Dimethyl-ether. See Veratrol. C. Monomethylate, C. Mono- methyl-ether. See Guaiacol.
  • Catelectrode (kat-el-ek' -trod) . See Kathode.
  • Catelectrotonus (kat-el-ek-trot'-o-nus). See Katelectrotonus.
  • Catenating (kat'-en-a-ting) (catenare, to chain together). Connecting; linking; e. g., catena- ting ague, ague associated with another disease.
  • Cathartate (kath-ar' -tat) . A salt of cathartic acid.
  • Cathartic (kath-ar' -tik) (see Catharsis). 1. Pur- gative. 2. A medicine used to produce evacu- ations of the bowels; a purgative. C. Acid. See Senna. C. Pill, Compound. See under Compound.
  • Cathartogenin (kath-ar -to)' -en-in). A yellow- brown subst.ance obtained from cathartic acid by decomposition with hydrochloric acid. Syn., Cathar to genie acid.
  • Cathartomannite (kath-ar -to -man' -It). See Sennit.
  • Catheterism, Catheterization (kath'-et-er -izm, kath-et-er-iz-a'-shun) (catheter). The intro- duction of a catheter.
  • Cathodal (kath' -o-dal) . See Kathodal.
  • Cathode (kath'-od). See Kathode.
  • Cathodic (kath-od'-ik). See Kathodic.
  • Cathypnosis (kath-ip' '-no-sis) (koOutzvojocc, a falling asleep). Synonym of African leth- argy.
  • Cation (kat'-e-on). See Kation.
  • Catlin, Catling (kat'-lin, kat'-ling) (dim. of cat). A long, pointed, two-edged knife used in amputation.
  • Catoptrics (kat-op'-triks) (nazonzpov, a mirror). The laws of the reflection of light.
  • Catramin (kaf -ram-in). A turpentine ob- tained from Tsuga canadensis and other conifers. It is recommended as a stimulant, diuretic, and expectorant in chronic respira- tory troubles, and is used in tuberculosis and lupus subcutaneously and as an em- brocation.
  • Caudad (haw'-dad) (cauda; ad, to). Toward the tail or cauda; opposed to cephalad; in man, downward.
  • Caudal (kaw'-dal) (cauda). Pertaining to a cauda or tail.
  • Caudate (kaw'-dat) (cauda). Having or re- sembling a tail. C. Lobe of Liver, a small lobe of the liver. C. Nucleus, the intra- ventricular portion of the corpus striatum.
  • Caudation (kaw-da'-shun) (cauda). 1. The condition of being furnished with a tail. 2. Elongation of the clitoris.
  • Caudatolenticular, Caudolenticular (haw- dat -o-len-tik'-u-lar, kaw-do -len-tik' -u-lar). Pertaining to both the caudate and the len- ticular nuclei.
  • Caudiferous (kaw-dif'-er-us) (cauda; ferre, to bear). Having a tail or tail-like appendage.
  • Caul (kawl) (ME., calle, a hood). 1. A por- tion or all of the fetal membranes covering the head and carried out in advance of it in labor. 2. The great omentum.
  • Cauloplegia (haw -lo-ple' -je-ah) (kcluXoc, a stalk; TzXrjyri, a stroke). Paralysis affecting the penis.
  • Caulosterin (kaw-los'-ter-in) (nauXog, a stalk; ozepioc, solid), C 26 H 44 0. An aromatic com- pound occurring in the root and stem of seedlings of the yellow lupine which have grown in the dark. It is levorotary, forming lustrous plates which melt at i58°-i59° C.
  • Causalgia (kaw-zaV -je-ah) (nauooc, a burning; aXyoc, pain). The burning pain that is some- times present in injuries of the nerves.
  • Cauterant (kaw'-ter-ant) (/iauzfjp, a burner). 1. Caustic; escharotic. 2. A caustic sub- stance.
  • Cauterism (kaw'-ter-izm). See Cauterization.
  • Cauterize (kaw'-ter-lz) (see Cautery). To sear or burn with a cautery or a caustic.
  • Caval (ka'-vat) (cava). Relating to a vena cava.
  • Cavalry-bone (kav'-al-re-bon). A bony de- posit in the adductor muscles of the thigh.
  • Cavascope (kav' -a-sko p) (cava; aaoTie'cv, to view). An apparatus for illuminating a cav- ity.
  • Cavern (kav'-ern) (caver na, a hollow). A cavity in the lung due to necrosis of the parenchyma; also the cavity of a dilated bronchus. C, Brand, one due to gangrenous destruction of a circumscribed segment of the lung parenchyma.
  • Cavernitis (kav-er-ni'-tis). Inflammation of the corpora cavernosa.
  • Cavernoma (kav-em-o' -mah) (cavern; b/xa, a tumor). A cavernous tumor; a cavernous angioma.
  • Cavitary (kav'-it-a-re) (cavitarius, hollow). Hollow; having or forming cavities.
  • Cayaponin (ka-ap 1 '-o-nin) (Cayaponia, Brazil- ian name). An alkaloid extracted from Cayaponia globosa, a cucurbitaceous plant of Brazil. It is said to purge without griping. Dose 1 gr. (0.06 Gm.).
  • Cayenne Pepper (hi' -en). See Capsicum.
  • Cceliotomy (se-le-of -o-me) . See Celiotomy.
  • Ceanothin (se-an-o' -thin) . 1. A brown powder obtained from Ceanothus americanus. It is purgative and alterative, and is used in syphilis, dysentery, and sore thro'at. Dose 1-2 gr. (0.065-0.13 Gm.). 2. An alkaloid isolated from Ceanothus americanus; slightly soluble in alcohol and ether.
  • Cearin (se'-ar-in). An ointment-base con- sisting of carnauba wax, 1 part; paraffin, 3 parts, melted together and mixed with 4 times its weight of liquid petrolatum.
  • Cebocephalus (se-bo-sej'-al-us) (nfiftoc, a mon- key; KS(f)a^7), head). A variety of single autositic monsters of the species Cycloceph- alus, in which there is entire absence of the nose, with, however, two orbital cavities and two eyes, the region between the eyes being narrow and perfectly flat.
  • Cebur (se'-bur). See Balsam, Tagulaway.
  • Cecal (se'-kal) (cecum). Pertaining to the cecum.
  • Cecectomy (se-sek 1 '-lom-e) (cecum; to/hjj, a cutting). Excision of part of the cecum.
  • Cecitis (se-si'-tis) (cecum; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of the cecum.
  • Cecocele (se'-ko-sel) (cecum; ktjXt), hernia) A hernia into the cecum. Syn., Typhlocele.
  • Cecostomy (se-kos'-to-me) (cecum; aro/ia, a mouth). The formation of an artificial anus in the cecum.
  • Cecum (se'-kum) (ccecus, blind). The large blind pouch or culdesac in which the large intestine begins.
  • Cedar (se f -dar) (cedrus, cedar). One of the genus of coniferous trees, Cedrus. C.-oil, a transparent oil obtained from Juniperus virginiana, and used as a clearing agent in histology and for oil-immersion lenses.
  • Celandin (sel r -an-din) . See Chelidonium.
  • Celarium, Ccelarium (se-la'-re-um). The epi- thelium of the celom.
  • Celiacomesenteric (se-le-ak-o-mez-en-ter' -ik) . Relating to the celiac and mesenteric regions.
  • Celialgia (se-le-aV -je-ah) (celia; dXjoc, pain). Pain in the abdomen.
  • Celian, Celine (se'-le-an, se'-lin). Same as Celiac.
  • Celianeurysm (se-le-an' -u-rizm) (celia; aveupuo- p.a, a widening). An abdominal aneu- rysm.
  • Celiectasia (se-le-ek-ta'-ze-ah) (celia; 'inxaocc, a stretching-out). Abnormal distention of the abdominal cavity.
  • Celiectomy (se-le-ek' -to-me) (celia; inxofirj, a cutting). Excision of an abdominal organ.
  • Celiemia (se-le-e' -me-ah) (celia; alp.a, blood). Hyperemia of the abdominal viscera.
  • Celiitis, Coeliitis (se-le-i' -tis) (celia; exec, in- flammation). Inflammation of the abdom- inal organs.
  • Celiocele, Coeliocele (se' -le-o-sel) (celia; ktjXtj, a hernia). Abdominal hernia.
  • Celiodynia, Coeliodynia (se-le-o-din'-e-ah) (celia; dduvq, pain). Pain in the abdomen.
  • Celiogastrotomy (se -le - o - gas - trot'- o - me) (celia; -faoTTip, stomach; xop.r), cutting). The opening of the stomach through abdominal incision.
  • Celiohysterectomy (se-le-o-his-ter-ek f -to-me) (celia; uoxipa, womb; inxopLTj, a cutting out), i. Excision of the uterus through an abdom- inal cut. 2. Porro-cesarean section.
  • Celiomyitis, Cceliomyitis (se-le-o-mi-i f -tis) (celia; fiuc, muscle; exec, inflammation). In- flammation of the muscles of the abdomen.
  • Celioschisis (se-le-os'-kis-is). Same as Gastros- chisis.
  • Celioscope (se f -le-o-skop) (ko'cXoc, a hollow; oKonelv, to examine). An apparatus for illuminating and inspecting body-cavities.
  • Celiotomy (se-le-of -o-me) (celia; xo/jltj, a cut- ting). Surgical opening of the abdominal cavity.
  • Celloidin (sel-oid' -in) (cell; eldoc, form). A concentrated form of collodion for use in embedding objects for histologic purposes.
  • Cellular (sel'-u-lar) (cell). Relating to or com- posed of cells. C. Pathology. See Pathol- ogy, Cellular.
  • Cellule (sel'-ul) (cellula, a small cell). A small cell.
  • Cellulic (sel'-u-lik). Relating to cells; derived from cell-walls by action of acids or alkalis.
  • Cellulicidal (sel-u-lis' -id-al) (cellule; ccedere, to kill). Destructive to cells.
  • Cellulifugal (sel-u-li' -u-gal) (cellule; fugere,^ to flee). Pertaining to the transmission of im- pulses from a nerve-cell.
  • Cellulipetal (sel-u-lip f -e-tal) (cellule; petere, to seek). Relating to the transmission of im- pulses toward a nerve -cell.
  • Celluloadipose (sel-u-lo-ad'-ip-oz). Relating to loose connective tissue containing fat-cells.
  • Cellulocutaneous (sel-u-lo-ku-ta' -ne-us) (cel- lule; cutis, skin). Relating to cellular tissue and the skin.
  • Cellulofibrinous (sel-u-lo-fi' -brin-us) . Both cel- lular and fibrinous.
  • Cellulosa (sel-u-lo'-sah) (L.). A cellular coat. C. chorioideae, the external layer of the choroid coat of the eye.
  • Cellulose (sel'-u-los) (cellule), C^H^Ok,. Wood- fiber; lignose, the principal ingredient of the cell-membranes of all plants. It is a white, amorphous mass, insoluble in most of the usual solvents. C, Reagent for. See Schultze, Schweitzer.
  • Cellulosity (sel-u-los'-e-te). The condition of being cellular.
  • Celom, Celoma (se'-lom, se-lo'-maK) (KoiAcofia, a cavity). The embryonic body -cavity.
  • Celosis (se-lo'-sis) (ko'cXoc, hollow). The formation of any cavity. C, Endocytic, the formation of a cavity within a cell. C, Paracytic, the formation of a cavity between cells.
  • Celotomy (se-lot'-o-me) (ktjXtj, hernia; revive cv, to cut). The operation for strangulated hernia by incision of the stricture.
  • Celsus'Area. Alopecia areata. C.'s Chancre, the soft chancre or chancroid. C.'s Kerion, suppurating ringworm, a pustular inflamma- tion of the hair -follicles of the scalp in tinea tonsurans. C.'s Papules, a form of acute papular eczema (lichen agrius).
  • Cementation (sem-en-ta' -shun) (cement). 1. A process of causing a chemic change in a substance by surrounding it with the powder of other substances and exposing the whole to red heat in a closed vessel for a length of time. 2. In biology, the con- crescence of hyphae.
  • Cementum (se-ment'-um). A layer of bone developed by ossification of the dental fol- licle over the root of the tooth. It differs from ordinary bone by the greater number of Sharpey's fibers in it. Its development begins on the milk-teeth during the fifth month.
  • Cenadelphus, Ccenadelphus (sen-a-del' -us) (kocvoc, common; ddeX^oc, a brother). A double monster with the halves equally de- veloped or having one or more vital organs in common.
  • Cenencephalocele (sen-en-sef -al-o-sel). See Kenencephalocele.
  • Cenesthesia (sen-es-the'-ze-ah). See Kenes- thesia.
  • Cenesthesis (sen-es-the' '-sis) . See Kenesthesis.
  • Cenosis (sen-o'-sis). See Kenosis.
  • Cenotic (sen-ot'-ik). See Kenotic.
  • Centaurea (sen-taw' -re-ah) (nhzaupoc, centaur). A genus of composite-flowered herbs. See Carduus.
  • Centaury (sen' -taw-re) (centaurea). A popular name for various plants of the genera Cen- taurea, Erythrcea, Sabbatia, Chlora, etc., especially Erythrcea centaurium, which is used as a simple, bitter tonic. Dose ^-1 dr. (2-4 Cc.) in decoction several times a day. Unof.
  • Centering (sen'-ter-ing) (center). In micro- scopy, the arrangement of an object or an accessory so that its center coincides with the optic axis of the microscope. In optics, having the pupil and the optic center of the refracting lens in the same axis.
  • Centesimal (sen-tes' -im-al) (centum, a hundred). In the proportion of 1 to 100.
  • Centesis (sen-te' -sis) (nevT-qocc, a pricking). Puncture; perforation. Centi- (sen-ti-) (centum). A prefix meaning one hundred.
  • Centifidous (sen-tif -id-us) (centi-; findere, to split). Cleft into many or 100 parts.
  • Centigrade (sen'-te-grdd) (centi-; gradus, sl step). Having 100 divisions or degrees. Abbreviation, C. C. Thermometer, a ther- mometer with zero as the freezing-point and ioo° as the boiling-point of water. See under Thermometer.
  • Centigram (sen' -te -gram) (centi-; ypdufxa, a small weight). The hundredth part of a gram, equal to 0.154328 grain troy.
  • Centiliter (sen' -til-e-ter) (centi-; X'apa, a pound). The hundredth part of a liter, equal to 0.6102 of a cubic inch.
  • Centimeter (sen' -tim-e-ter) (centi-; fxkxpov, a measure). The hundredth part of a meter, equal to 0.3937 ( or about -f) of an inch.
  • Centinormal (sen-te-nor'-mal) (centi-; norma, normal). The t ^q °f the normal; applied to a solution the t ^q of the strength of a normal solution.
  • Centrad (sen' -trad) (centrum; ad, to). Toward the center, or toward the median line.
  • Centrality (sen-tral'-it-e). Applied to the con- dition of nervous phenomena originating in the central nervous system and not in the peripheral nerves.
  • Centraphose, Centrophose (sen'-trah-fos, sen'- tro-foz). See under Phose.
  • Centric (sen'-trik) (centrum). Relating to a center, especially to a nerve-center.
  • Centrifugal (sen-lrif -u-gal) (centrum; fugere, to flee). Receding from the center to the periphery. C. Machine, one by which tubes of liquid are rapidly revolved for the pur- pose of driving particles floating in the liquid to the distal ends of the tubes.
  • Centrifugalization (sen-trif-u-gal-iz-a' -shun) (see Centrifugal). The use of a centrifuge.
  • Centrifuge (sen' -trif-uf) (see Centrifugal). A centrifugal machine; an apparatus for separ- ating substances by centrifugal force.
  • Centriole (sen' -tre-ol) (centrum). Boveri's term for a minute body, central horn, contained within the centrosome; in some cases it is not distinguishable from the latter.
  • Centripetal (sen-trip' -et-al) (centrum; petere, to seek). Traveling toward the center from - the periphery.
  • Centro- (sen-tro-) (centrum). A prefix meaning central.
  • Centrodesmus (sen-tro-des'-mus) (centro-; deofioc, a band). Heidenhain's term for the band primarily connecting the centrosomes and giving rise to the central spindle.
  • Centrodorsal (sen-tro-dor' -sal) . Pertaining to the central dorsal region. CENTROLECITHAL 261 CEPHALOPAGUS Centrolecithal (sen-tro-les' -ith-al) (centro-; U/aOof, yolk). In embryology, having the food-yolk located centrally.
  • Centrosclerosis, Centroosteosclerosis (sen- tr o -skier -o' -sis, sen-tr o-os-te-o -skier -o' -sis) (cen- tro-; sclerosis). Osteosclerosis of the central cavities of bones.
  • Centrosphere (sen'-tro-sfer). See Sphere 0 At- traction.
  • Centrostaltic (sen-tro-stal f -tik) (centro-; oxalate, constriction). Relating to the action of ner- vous force in a spinal center. C. Motion, the motion of nervous force in the spinal center.
  • Cephaelin (sef-a'-el-in). See Emetin.
  • Cephaelis (sef-a'-cl-is). See Ipecacuanha.
  • Cephal- (sef-al-). See Cephalo-.
  • Cephalad (sef'-al-ad) (cephal-; ad, to). Toward the head.
  • Cephalalgia (sef-al-aV-je-ah) (cephal-; aXyoc, pain). Headache.
  • Cephalhematocele (sef-al-hem-af -o-seT) (ceph- al-; hematocele). A hematocele situated beneath the scalp, and communicating with a dural sinus. C., Stromeyer's, subperi- osteal cephalhematoma, communicating with veins and becoming tensely filled during strong expiratory efforts.
  • Cephalhematoma (sef - al - hem -at-o' - mah) (cephal-; hematoma). 1. A collection of blood beneath the pericranium, forming a tumor-like swelling. 2. Caput succedaneum. C, External, an effusion between the pericranium and the skull. C, Internal, an effusion between the dura and the skull.
  • Cephalic (sef-aV-ik) (Kecfyali), head). 1. Per- taining to the head. 2. Any remedy for headache. C. Index. See Index, Cephalic. C. Version. See Version, Cephalic.
  • Cephalitis (sef-al-i'-tis). See Encephalitis. C. aegyptiaca, an epidemic form of encephalitis occurring in Egypt during the hot winds of early summer. C. littriana, inflammation of the epiphyses. C. meningica, meningitis. C. nervosa, pertussis.
  • Cephalo- (sef-al-o-). A prefix denoting relating to the head.
  • Cephaloclasia (sef-al-o-kla'-ze-ah). See Ceph- alotripsy.
  • Cephalodynia (sef-al-o-din'-e-ah) (cephalo-; douvrj, pain). Rheumatism affecting the oc- cipitofrontalis muscle, the pain being chiefly experienced in the forehead or occiput, and at times involving the eyeballs.
  • Cephalogaster (sef-al-o-gas'-ter) (cephalo-; yaazrjp, stomach). The anterior division of the enteric canal, as in certain parasitic worms, where it is continued into a second division, the typhlosole.
  • Cephalohemometer (sef-al-o-hcm-om' -et-er) (cephalo-; al/ia, blood; uirpov, a measure). An instrument for noting changes in the intra- cranial blood-pressure.
  • Cephalology (sef-al-ol'-o-je) (cephalo-; Xbyog, science). The science of cranial measure- ments and indications.
  • Cephalomelus (sef-al-om'-el-us) (cephalo-; fiiAoc, a part). A form of double monster in which there is a supernumerary limb at- tached to the head.
  • Cephalomenia (sef-al-o-mc'-ne-ah) (cephalo-; firjv, a month). Vicarious menstruation through the nose.
  • Cephalometer (sef-al-om' -et-er) (cephalo-; ptirpov, a measure). An instrument for meas- uring the head.
  • Cephalomyitis (sef-al-o-mi-i f -tis) (cephalo-; fide, a muscle; tuc, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the muscles of the head.
  • Cephalonia (sef-al-o' -ne-ah) (Ke(f>aXr), head). Macrocephaly with hypertrophy of the brain.
  • Cephalopagus (sef-al-op'-ag-us) (cephalo-; Kayetc, joined). A double monstrosity having the heads united at the top. CEPHALOPHARYNGEUS 262 CEREBRIN Cephalopharyngeus (sef-al-o-far-in'-je-us). i. Relating to the head and pharynx. 2. See under Muscle.
  • Cephaloplegia (sef-al-o-ple f -je-ah) (cephalo-; 7tXr)fT), a stroke). Paralysis of the muscles about the head and face.
  • Cephalorachidian (sef-al-o-rak-id'-e-an). Same as Cerebrospinal.
  • Cephaloscopy (sef-al-os' -ko-pe) (cephalo-; onoTielv, to examine). 1. Auscultation of the head. 2. Examination of the head with a view to ascertaining the condition of the mental faculties.
  • Cephalothoracopagus (sef-al-o-tho-rak-op'-ag- us) (cephalo-; dd>pa£, thorax; nafecc, joined). A double-headed monster with united thoraxes and necks. These monsters are divided by Veit into prosopothoracopagus and synce- phalus.
  • Cephalotomy (sef-al-ot'-o-me) (cephalo-; to/it), section). The opening or division of the head of the fetus to facilitate labor.
  • Cephalotribe (se' -al-o-trlb) (cephalo-; rpcfiscv, to crush). An instrument for crushing the fetal head.
  • Cephalotridymus (sef-al-o-trid' -im-us) (ceph- alo-; rptdu/xoc, triple). A three-headed mon- ster.
  • Cephalotripsy (sef ' -al-o-trip-se) (cephalo-; rp~c(!)cc, a crushing). The operation of crush- ing the fetal head when delivery is other- wise impossible.
  • Cephalotrypesis (sef-al-o-tri-pe'-sis) (cephalo-; Tpun-qocc;, a boring). A trephining of the skull.
  • Ceptor (sep'-tor) (capere, to take). A term suggested by Ehrlich in place of intermediary body. According to the manner of action he distinguishes uniceptors and amboceptors.
  • Cerasin (ser'-as-in) (cerasus, a cherry-tree). 1. An ingredient of the gum of cherry-, peach-, and plum-trees, apparently identical with bassorin. 2. A crude precipitate from tinc- ture of choke-cherry.
  • Cerato- (ser-at-o-). See Kerato-.
  • Ceratum (se'-ra-tum). See Cerate.
  • Cercomonad (ser-kom'-o-nad). A member of the genus Cercomonas.
  • Cercomonas (ser-kom'-o-nas) (nkpnoc;, tail; fiovac, monad). A genus of flagellate infu- sorians. C. intestinalis, a protozoon, occa- sionally found in the fecal discharges of pa- tients suffering with typhoid fever, chronic diarrhea, or cholera. Its pathologic signifi- cance has not yet been ascertained.
  • Cerea flexibilitas (se'-re-ah fleks-ib-il'-il-as). That condition of muscular tension in the insane in which the limbs may be molded into any position.
  • Cereal (se'-re-al) (Ceres, the goddess of agri- culture). 1. Relating to edible grains. 2. Any edible grain.
  • Cerebellar (ser-e-bel'-ar) (cerebrum). Relating to the cerebellum. C. Tonsil. See Amygdala (2).
  • Cerebellifugal (ser-e-bel-i)' -u-gal) (cerebrum; fugere, to flee). Tending from the cerebrum.
  • Cerebellipetal (ser-e-bel-ip'-e-tal) (cerebrum; petere, to seek). Tending toward the cere- brum.
  • Cerebellum (ser-e-bel f -um) (dim. of cerebrum). The inferior part of the brain lying below the cerebrum and above the pons and me- dulla. It consists of two lateral lobes and a middle lobe.
  • Cerebral (ser'-e-bral) (cerebrum). Relating to the cerebrum. C. Fornix. See Fornix, Cere- bral. C. Gyri, the convolutions of the brain. C. Index. See Index, Cerebral. C. Pneumo- nia. See Pneumonia, Cerebral. C. Ves- icles, the embryonic vesicles from which the brain is developed.
  • Cerebrasthenia (ser-e-bras-the' '-ne-ah) (cere- brum; asthenia). Cerebral asthenia; cere- bral neurasthenia.
  • Cerebration (ser-e-bra'-shun) (cerebrum). Men- tal activity. C, Unconscious, mental activ- ity of which the subject is not conscious.
  • Cerebriform (ser-e' -bre-form) . See Cerebroid.
  • Cerebritis (ser-e-bri'-tis) (cerebrum; tree, in- flammation). Inflammation of the proper substance of the cerebrum. C, Local, soft- ening of the brain.
  • Cerebro- (se-re-bro-) (cerebrum). A prefix denot- ing relating to the cerebrum.
  • Cerebrocardiac (ser-e-bro-kar' '-de-ak) (cerebro-; napd'ca, the heart). Applied to diseases charac- terized by both cerebral and cardiac symptoms.
  • Cerebroid (ser'-e-broid) (cerebro-; eWoc, like- ness). Resembling brain-substance.
  • Cerebrology (ser-e-brol'-o-je) (cerebro-; Xoyoc, science). The science of the brain; enceph- alology.
  • Cerebromalacia (ser-e-bro-mal-a'-se-ah) (cere- bro-; ualaKia, softness). Softening of the brain tissue.
  • Cerebrometer (ser-e-brom' -et-er) (cerebro- ; jxkxpov, a measure). An instrument for re- cording cerebral impulses.
  • Cerebroolein (ser-e-bro-o f -le-in). A compound of olein and lecithin forming a yellow oil; it is obtained from brain tissue.
  • Cerebropontile (ser-e-bro-pon'-tiT). Relating to the cerebrum and pons.
  • Cerebroscopy (ser-e-bros'-ko-pe) (cerebro-; oKone'cv, to inspect). 1. Bouchut's term for ophthalmoscopy employed by neurologists. 2. Encephaloscopy.
  • Cerebrose (ser'-e-bros) (cerebrum), C 6 H 12 2 . A crystallized sugar isomeric with glucose, oc- curring in brain tissue.
  • Cerebrosid (ser'-e-bro-sid) (cerebrum). One of a class of substances occurring in brain tissue, containing cerebrose, just as glucosids contain glucose.
  • Cerebrospinal (ser-e-bro-spi'-nal) (cerebro- ; spina, the spine). Pertaining to the brain and spinal cord. C. Axis. See Axis, Cerebrospinal. C. Fluid, the fluid between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater. C. Meningitis. See Fever, Cerebrospinal. C. System, the brain, spinal cord, and nerves.
  • Cerebrosuria (ser-e-bro-su' -re-ah). The pres- ence of cerebrose in the urine ; cerebral diabetes.
  • Cerecloth (ser'-Moth) (cera). Cloth impreg- nated with wax and rendered antiseptic; used as a dressing for wounds.
  • Cereus (se'-re-us) (L., "a wax candle"). A genus of cactaceous plants. C. grandi- florus. See Cactus grandiflorus.
  • Cerevisia (ser-e-vis'-e-ah). See Cervisia.
  • Cerevisin (ser-e-vis'-in). Dried yeast used internally in furunculosis (dose 1 teaspoonful before each meal) and for application in leukorrhea and gonorrheal vaginitis (15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.) in suppository of cacao-butter).
  • Ceric (se'-rili) (cera). 1. Relating to wax. 2. Containing cerium as a quadrivalent radicle.
  • Cerin (se'-rin) (cera). 1. An ether of cer- otic acid; one of the substances found in wax. 2. (Of Chevreul.) A crystalline pre- cipitate from an aqueous extract of cork by action of hot alcohol.
  • Cerite (se'-rit). A Swedish mineral formerly called the heavy stone of Bastnas, from which cerium is obtained.
  • Ceroceric (se-ro-se'-rik). Containing cerium both as a trivalent and as a quadrivalent radicle.
  • Ceroma (se-ro'-mali) (cera; ofia, a tumor). A cystic tumor the tissue of which has under- gone fatty degeneration.
  • Cerostroma, Cerostrosis (ser-o-slro f -mah, -sis). See Ichthyosis hyslrix.
  • Cerotate (se'-ro-tdt). A salt of cerotic acid.
  • Cerotic (se-ro'-tik). Derived from wax. C. Acid. See Acid, Cerotic.
  • Cerous (se'-rus). Containing cerium as a trivalent radicle.
  • Cerumen (ser-u f -men) (cera). The wax of the ear.
  • Ceruminosis (ser-u-min-o'-sis). An excessive secretion of cerumen.
  • Ceruminous (ser-u'-min-us) (cera). Pertain- ing to cerumen.
  • Ceruse (se f -rus) (L., cerussa). 1. White lead: CERUSSA 264 CHALCITIS basic carbonate and hydrate of lead. 2. A white face-powder. C., Antimony, white oxid of antimony; also antimonic acid.
  • Cerussa (se-rus'-ah). See Ceruse.
  • Cervi co vesical (ser-vik-o-ves'-ik-al). Pertain- ing to the bladder and the cervix uteri.
  • Cervicalis (ser-vik-a'-lis) (cervix). 1. Cervical. 2. A cervical artery, muscle, nerve, or vein.
  • Cervicispinal (ser-vis-e-spi'-naT). Relating to the neck and spinal cord.
  • Cervicitis (ser-vis-i'-tis) (cervix ; cxcg, inflam- mation). Inflammation of the cervix uteri.
  • Cervicoauricular (ser - vik -o -aw - rik'-u-lar). Relating to the back of the neck and the outer ear.
  • Cervicohumeral (ser-vik-o-hu'-mer-al). Re- lating to the neck and the upper arm.
  • Cervicomuscular (ser-vik-o-mus'-ku-lar). Re- lating to the muscles of the neck.
  • Cervicosca$u\ax (ser -vik-o-skap'-u-lar). 1. Re- lating to the back of the neck and the scapula. 2. The transverse artery or vein of the neck.
  • Cervimeter (ser-vim'-et-er) (cervix; fierpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring the cervix uteri.
  • Cervisia (ser-vis'-e-ah) (L.). Ale or beer. Cervisise fermentum, beer-yeast. The ferment obtained in brewing beer, and pro- duced by Saccharomyces cerevisim.
  • Cervix (ser'-viks) (L.). A constricted portion or neck. C. obstipa, C. rigida, wry-neck. C. uteri, the neck of the uterus. C. vesicae, the neck of the bladder.
  • Cestode, Cestoid (ses r -tdd, ses'-toid) (nearSc, a girdle; ecdof, likeness). Shaped like a gir- dle or ribbon; applied to worms, of which Tcenia is a type.
  • Cetacea (se-ta'-se-ah) (ktjtoc', a whale). An order of mammals living in the sea, as the whale, dolphin, etc.
  • Cetin (se'-Hn) (see Cetacea), C 32 H 64 2 . The chief constituent of commercial purified sperma- ceti. It is a fatty, crystalline substance, soluble in alcohol and ether, insoluble in water, melting at 49 C, and volatilizing at 360 C. Syn., Cetinum.
  • Ceyssatite (ses'-a-tlt) (Ceyssat, a village of Puy-de-D6me, France). A fossil earth from the village of Ceyssat, France, composed almost entirely of pure silica. It is used as an absorbent dusting-powder.
  • Chalaza (kal-a'-zah) (chalazion). One of the twisted cords binding the yolk-bag of an egg to the lining membrane of the shell; or that part of a seed where its coats unite with each other and the nucleus.
  • Chalazia (kal-a'-ze-ah) (chalazion). 1. The socalled hailstone sputa. 2. A chalazion.
  • Chalcosis (kal-ko'-sis) (jod/cof, copper). A de- posit of copper particles in the tissues.
  • Chalicosis (kal-ik-o' -sis) (x&Xitzi gravel). A disease of the lungs caused by the inhalation of dust or sand.
  • Chalinoplasty (kal-in-o-plas' -te) (xahvbc, a bridle or rein; nAaooeiv, to form). An opera- tion to form a new frenum of the tongue.
  • Chalk (chawk) (calx, limestone). Carbonate of lime. See Calcium. C. -stone, gout-stone — a deposit beneath the skin in gouty patients.
  • Chalkitis (kal-ki'-tis). See Chalcilis.
  • Chalybeate (ka-lib' -e-at) (^aXu^, steel). i. Containing iron. 2. Having the color or taste of iron. 3. A substance or medicine con- taining iron.
  • Champacol (sham' -pa-kol) (champaka, Benga- lese name). A camphor, C 17 H 30 O, from the wood of the champak-trce, Michelia champaca. Syn., Champaca camphor.
  • Champagne (sham-pan) (Fr.). An efferves- cent wine useful as a remedy for nausea and vomiting.
  • Chancrous (shang'-krus). Of the nature of a chancre.
  • Change (chdfij) (cambiare, to change). The word is colloquially used for either the establishment or the cessation of the men- strual function. C. of Life, the menopause.
  • ChantreuiPs Method (shang-treeV). In pel- vimetry, a method of ascertaining the distance between the tuberosities of the ischiums (ir cm.) in estimating the size of the pelvic outlet. The two thumbs are placed upon the tuberosities, while an assistant measures the distance between them.
  • Charbon (shar'-bon) (Fr., "charcoal"). An- thrax (q. v.).
  • Charcoal (char f -kol) (ME., charren, to turn; col, coal). Coal made by subjecting wood to a process of smothered combustion. See under Carbo.
  • Charcot-Guinon's Disease (shar-ko'-gwe- no'iri)). Dementia complicating some cases of progressive muscular dystrophy.
  • Charcot-Leyden's Crystals (shar-ko-li'-den). See Crystals, Char cot -Ley den' s.
  • Chariot (char' -e-ot) . The movable coil of an induction apparatus.
  • Charlatan (shar' -lat-an) (Ital., ciarlatano, a quack). A quack; a pretender to medical skill; an advertising doctor.
  • Charleyhorse (char'-le-hors). Stiffness of the right arm and leg in baseball players.
  • Charpie (shar'-pe) (car per e, to pluck). Picked or shredded lint; linen shreds for dressing wounds.
  • Charriere's Guillotine (shar-re-dr'). An in- strument for excising tonsils.
  • Chartula (kart'-u-lah) (dim. of charta). A little paper, especially a paper containing a single dose of a medicinal powder.
  • Chasma, Chasmus (kaz'-mah, kaz'-mus) \x aa ~ p.6c, a gaping). A yawn.
  • Chaussier's Areola (sho-se-ar') . The areola of inflammatory induration of a malignant pustule. C.'s Line, the raphe of the corpus callosum.
  • Chautard's Test for Acetone (sho-tar'(r)). Allow sulfurous acid to pass through a solution of 0.25 Gm. of fuchsin in 500 Cc. of water until the solution becomes yellow. On the addition of a portion of this to the liquid to be tested for acetone it will assume a violet color if acetone is present.
  • Chauveau's Retention Theory (sho-vo'). See under Immunity.
  • Chaya, C.-root (chi'-ah). The plant, Aerva lanata. Syn., Shaya-root.
  • Check (chek) (OF., eschec, from Pers. shah, a king). A sudden stop. C. -experiment. See Control Experiment. C. -ligament. See Ligament, Check-.
  • Checkerberry (chek'-er-ber-e) . A popular name for Gaultheria procumbens.
  • Cheek (chek) (AS., cedce). The side of the face; it is composed of fat, areolar tissue, muscles, etc.
  • Cheese (chez) (AS., cese). A food prepared from the casein of skimmed or unskimmed milk.
  • Cheesy (chcz'-e) (cheese). Of the nature of cheese. C. Degeneration, C. Necrosis, caseous degeneration or caseation; the con- version of the tissues into a substance resembling cheese. C. Tubercle, a tubercle that has undergone cheesy necrosis.
  • Cheil-, Cheilo- (kil-, ki-lo-). For words thus beginning see Chil- or Chilo-.
  • Cheiranthin (ki-ran' -thin) . A glucosid from the leaves and seeds of Cheiranthus cheiri, with action similar to that of digitalis.
  • Cheiro- (ki-ro-). For words thus beginning see Chiro-.
  • Chelate (ke'-ldt) (xy^V, a claw). 1. Claw- shaped. 2. Having claw-shaped appendages or processes.
  • Chelen (ke-len'). Ethyl chlorid.
  • Chelerythrin (kel-er'-ith-rin), C 19 H 17 N0 4 . A poisonous alkaloid obtained from Chelidon- ium.
  • Chelidoxanthin (kel-id-o-zan'-tkin) (chelid- onium). One of the bitter, crystalline con- stituents of celandin.
  • Cheloid (ke'-loid). See Keloid.
  • Chelotomy (ke-lof -o-me) . See Kelotomy.
  • Chemic, Chemical (kem'-ik, kem'-ik-al) (chem- istry). Of or pertaining to chemistry.
  • Chemicity (kem-is' -it-e) . The state of having chemic properties.
  • Chemicoanalytic (kem-ik-o-an-al-it'-ik). Re- lating to chemic analysis.
  • Chemicocautery (kem-ik-o-kaw'-ter-e). Cau- terization by means of chemic agents.
  • Chemiotaxis, Chimiotaxis (kem'-e-o-taks-is, kim'-e-o-taks-is). See Chemotaxis.
  • Chemosis (ke-mo r -sis) (xi)p.coocc, a gaping). Swelling of the conjunctiva.
  • Chemosmosis (kem-os-mo' -sis) (chemistry; (baiiog, an impulse). Chemic action resulting from osmosis.
  • Chemotic (ke-mot'-ik) (chemosis). Pertaining to or marked by chemosis.
  • Chemotropism (kem-ot'-ro-pizm) (chemistry; rponrj, a turning). The destruction of bac- teria by phagocytes; the victory of the phagocytes over bacteria, or of bacteria over phagocytes. In biology, the attraction of leukocytes by certain chemic substances held in solution in the blood. Cf. Chemotaxis.
  • Chiasmal (ki-'az-mal). Pertaining to the optic chiasm.
  • Chickahominy Fever (chik-a-hom' -in-e) . A synonym of Typhomalarial fever.
  • Chicory (chik'-or-e) (ac^opa, chicory). Cichor- ium intybus, a composite plant of Europe and Asia, naturalized and growing in the United States. Its ground root is used to adulterate coffee.
  • Chielin (ki'-el-in). A thick, nontoxic, brown, viscous substance isolated from the bulb of the tulip. It is recommended in eczema and in skin diseases in veterinary practice.
  • Chilalgia, Cheilalgia (ki-laV -je-ah) (xeeAoc, lip; aXjoc, pain). Neuralgia affecting the lips.
  • Chilblain (chil'-blan) (AS., cele, cold; blegen, a boil). A congestion and swelling of the skin, due to cold, and attended with severe itching or burning; vesicles and bullas may form, and these may lead to ulceration. Syn., Erythema pernio; Pernio.
  • Chill (chil) (AS., cele, chilliness). A sensation of cold accompanied by shivering, usually appearing shortly after exposure to cold or wet. It is frequently the initial symptom of acute disorders, as pneumonia, etc. It is a prominent symptom of various forms of malarial fever.
  • Chilo- (ki-lo-) (xslXof, lip). A prefix meaning relating to the lips.
  • Chilognathopalatoschisis, Cheilognathopal- atoschisis ( ki - log'- nath -o- pal- at - os'~ ki - sis) (chilo-; jvaOoc, jaw; palatum, the palate; oxtatC, a splitting). Marchand's term for a malformation marked by fissure of the lip, alveolar process, and palate.
  • Chiloplasty, Cheiloplasty (ki' -lo - plas - te) \chilo-; TiXaooeiv, to form). Any plastic opera- tion upon the lip.
  • Chimogene (ki'-mo-jen) "(%£c/4(bv, cold winter weather; yevvdv, to produce). A highly volatile liquid proposed by Vanderweyde as a substitute for rhigolene, ether, etc., producing cold in local anesthesia.
  • China (kin' -ah or ke'-nah). Same as Cinchona.
  • Chinaphthol (kin-aj'-thol). A yellow, bitter, insoluble powder, used as an intestinal anti- septic. Dose 7I-75 gr. (0.5-5.0 Gm.) daily. Syn., Quinin betanaphthol-a-monosulfate.
  • Chinaseptol (kin-a-sep'-tol). See Diaphtol.
  • Chinoform (kin' -o- form). A compound of for- maldehyd with cinchotannin. Syn., Quinoform.
  • Chinol (kin'-ol). Quinolin monohypochlorite, C 9 H 6 N . CIO, a white, crystalline, odorless powder, with a pungent taste; soluble in alcohol, almost insoluble in cold or hot water. It is antipyretic and analgesic. Dose 3-5 gr. (0.19-0.32 Gm.).
  • Chinolin, Chinolina (kin'-o-lin, kin-o-li'-nah). See Quinolin.
  • Chinon (kin' -on). See Quinon.
  • Chinopyrin (kin-o-pi'-rin). See Quinopyrin. CHINORAL 269 CHLORALACETOPHENONOXIM Chinoral (kin'-or-al). An oily, bitter liquid containing quinin and chloral; antiseptic and hypnotic. Dose 1-15 gr. (0.06-1.0 Gm.). Syn., Quinochloral.
  • Chinosol (kin' -o-soV) . See Quinosol.
  • Chionablepsia (ki-on-ab-lep' -se-ah) (xctov, snow; d^ke^ca, without sight). Loss of sensibility of the retina resulting from the exposure of the eyes to reflection of the sunlight upon snow; snow-blindness.
  • Chionyphe (ki-on'-if-e). Madura-foot.
  • Chiro-, Cheiro- (ki-ro-) (x ei P, the hand). A prefix meaning hand.
  • Chirokinesthetic, Cheirokinesthetic (ki-ro- kin-es-thet' '-ik) (chiro-; kinesthetic). Relating to the subjective perception of the motions of the hand, particularly in writing.
  • Chirol (ki'-rol). A solution of resins and fatty oils in a mixture of ethers and alcohols, used as a protective varnish for the hands in surgery.
  • Chiromegaly (ki-ro-meg'-al-e) (chiro-; iisyakr), large). Enlargement of one, two, or three extremities, in whole or in part, but not of akromegalic nature. Syn., Pscudoakromegaly.
  • Chirometer,Cheirometer (ki-rom'-et-er) (chiro-; {xkxpov, a measure). Osiander's instrument for measuring a distance on the finger or hand in manual pelvimetry.
  • Chiropelvimeter, Cheiropelvimeter (ki-ro- pel-vim' -et-er) (chiro-; pelvis; (ikxpov, a measure). In manual pelvimetry, an instru- ment for measuring the hand.
  • Chiropodalgia, Cheiropodalgia (ki-ro-pod-aV - je-ah). See Acrodynia.
  • Chiropodist (ki-ro p f -o-dist) (chiro-; nobg, foot). A surgeon or person who professionally treats diseases of the hands and feet, especially corns, bunions, etc.
  • Chirospasm, Cheirospasm (ki' -ro - spazm) (chiro-; anao-fioc;, a drawing). Writers' cramp.
  • Chirotheca, Cheirotheca (ki-ro-the'-ka) (chiro-; drjKT), case). A long, narrow roller bandage for wrapping the fingers. C. compieta, one for all the fingers of a hand. C. incompleta, one for a single finger only.
  • Chirurgeon (ki-rur'-jon) (xecpoupyoc, a sur- geon). A surgeon.
  • Chirurgia (ki - rur' - je - ah) (see Chirurgeon). Surgery.
  • Chitin (ki'-tin) (xcrcov, a tunic), C 15 H 26 N 2 O 10 . A colorless skeletin; the animal analog of the cellulose of plants.
  • Chitinous (ki'-tin-us). Resembling chitin. C. Degeneration, amyloid degeneration. Chitonitis (ki-ton-i'-tis) (%cTtuv, a tunic; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of any invest- ing membrane.
  • Chittim-bark (chit' -im-bark) . See Cascara sagrada.
  • Chloracetic Acid (klo-ras-e'-tik). See Acid, Chloracetic.
  • Chloracetization (klo-ras-et-iz-a'-shun). The production of local anesthesia by chloroform and glacial acetic acid.
  • Chloracetyl (klor-as'-et-il). 1. C 2 C1 2 . A radi- cle formed from acetyl by the replacement of hydrogen with chlorin. 2. Acetyl chlorid.
  • Chloralacetaldoxim (klo-ral-as-et-al-doks'-im), C 4 H NO 2 Cl 3 . A white, crystalline powder, soluble in alcohol and ether, melting at 74 C. It is hypnotic.
  • Chloralacetophenonoxim (klo-ral-as-ef-o-fe- non-oks'-im), C 6 H 5 . CH 3 C. A substance forming colorless prisms, soluble in alcohol CHLORALACETOXIM 270 CHLORIN and ether, melting at 8i° C. It is used in tetanus and epilepsy.
  • Chloralacetoxim (klo-ral-as-et-oks'-im), C 4 H 8 - N0 2 C1 3 . A white, crystalline powder, soluble in alcohol and ether, and melting at 72 ° C. It is hypnotic.
  • Chloralamid (klo-ral'-am-id). SeeChloralform- ' amid.
  • Chloralbacid (klo-ral-bas'-id). A compound of chlorin and albumin. It is used as a tonic in gastric disorders. Dose 7J-15 gr. (0.5-1.0 Gm.). C. Sodium, a compound of chloralb- / acid and sodium; it is used in gastric and / intestinal affections. Dose 15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.) before meals.
  • Chloralbenzaldoxim (klo-ral-ben-zal-doks'-im), C 9 H 8 N0 2 C1 3 . A white, crystalline powder, soluble in alcohol and ether, melting at 62 ° C. It is hypnotic and antiseptic.
  • Chloralcamphoroxim (klo - ral - kam - for - oks'-im), C 12 H 18 N0 2 C1 3 . A white, crystalline powder, soluble in alcohol and ether, melt- ing at 98 C. It is hypnotic, stimulant, and antiseptic.
  • Chloralformamid (klo-ral-form'-am-id). A crystalline solid (chloralformamidum, U. S. P.), C 3 H 4 C1 3 N0 2 . Used as a hypnotic. Dose 30-45 gr. (2-3 Gm.). • Chloralic (klo-ral'-ik). Relating to chloral.
  • Chloralimid (klo-ral' -im-id) (chloral; imid), CC1 3 . CH . NH. A hypnotic allied to chloral, soluble in alcohol. The dose is the same as that of chloral hydrate.
  • Chloralin (klo'-ral-in). An antiseptic fluid containing monochlorphenol and bichlor- phenol. It is used in 2 to 3 % solution; as a gargle, in 0.5 to 1 % solution.
  • Chloralism (klo'-ral-izm) (chloral). 1. Chloral- poisoning, the morbid state caused by the injudicious use of chloral. 2. The habit of using chloral.
  • Chloralization (klo - ral -iz- a' -shun). 1. See Chloralism. 2. Anesthesia by means of hydra ted chloral.
  • Chloralose (klo' -ral-ds) (chloral; glucose), C 8 H n Cl 3 . O e . Anhydroglyco-chloral; a pro- duct of the action of anhydrous chloral upon glucose. It is used as a hypnotic. Dose 3-14 gr. (0.2-0.9 Gm.).
  • Chloraloxims (klo-ral-oks'-ims). A series of chemic compounds the physiologic activities of which are claimed to be due to their split- ting up in the system into chloral hydrate and their respective oxims. See Chloral- acetoxim, Chloralbenzaldoxim, etc.
  • Chloraloxylose (klo-ral-o-zi' '-loz) (chloral; xylose). A combination of hydrated chloral and xylose. A convulsivant.
  • Chloralum (klo'-ral-um). Crude aluminium chlorid mixed with various sodium and calcium salts; a disinfectant.
  • Chloramid (klo' -ram-id) . Same as Chloralamid.
  • Chloranemia (klor-an-e'-me-ah). Synonym of Chlorosis.
  • Chloranodyne (klor-an'-o-din) (chlorin; ano- dyne). A proprietary remedy, introduced as an improvement on chlorodyne. It contains morphin hydrochlorid, tincture of cannabis indica, chloroform, dilute hydrocyanic acid, and aromatics. Dose for an adult 15 min. (1 Cc).
  • Chlorargentate (klor-ar'-j en-tat). A combina- tion of silver chlorid with the chlorid of some other radicle or element.
  • Chlorarsenous (klor-ar-se'-nus). Arsenous and also containing chlorin.
  • Chlorate (klo' -rat) (chlorin). A salt of chloric acid.
  • Chlorated (klo'-ra-ted). Containing, combined with, or charged with chlorin.
  • Chlorazol (klo'-raz-ol). A highly toxic, oily liquid, obtained from albumin, glutin, or dried muscle by action of strong nitric and hydrochloric acids.
  • Chlorbenzoyl (klor-ben'-zo-il). See Benzoyl Chlorid.
  • Chlorbromid (kldr-bro'-mid). A combination of a radicle with chlorin and bromin.
  • Chlorcamphor (klor -kam' -for). A name for several compounds of chlorin and camphor.
  • Chlorepatitis (klor-ep-at-i'-tis) (chlorin; hepa- titis). Chronic hepatitis combined with chlo- rosis.
  • Chlorephidrosis (klor -ef -id-ro' -sis) \chlorin; i(f>cdpoocg, perspiration). A condition charac- terized by greenish perspiration.
  • Chlorethylene (klor-eth'-il-en). A substance formed from ethylene by replacement of one or more atoms of hydrogen with chlorin. C. Chlorid, C. Dichlorid, C 2 H 3 C1 3 , an oil with odor like that of ethene chlorid, boiling at 115 C; employed as an anesthetic.
  • Chlorethylidene (klor-eth' -il-id-en). A chlorin substitution-compound of ethylidene. C. Chlorid, C. Dichlorid, C 2 H 4 C1 2 , a liquid used as an anesthetic. Syn., Chlorinated ethyl chlorid; Mono chlorethylidene dichlorid.
  • Chloretone (klor'-et-on). See Acetone Chloro- form.
  • Chlorhematin (klor -hem' -a-tin). See Hemin.
  • Chlorhydria (klor-hi'-dre-ah). An excess of hydrochloric acid in the stomach.
  • Chlorhydric (klor-hi'-drik). Composed of chlorin and hydrogen; hydrochloric.
  • Chloric (klo'-rik) (chlorin). Pertaining to or containing chlorin. C. Acid. See Acid, Chloric. C. Ether. 1. See Ethyl Chlorid. 2. See Chloroform, Spirit of.
  • Chlorid (klo'-rid) (chlorin). A binary com- pound, one of the elements of which is chlorin. C, Methyl-. See under Anesthetic, Local.
  • Chlorinated (klo' - rin - a - led). Containing chlorin or combined with it.
  • Chloriodoform (klo-ri-o' -do-form), CHC1 2 I. A yellow oil obtained from chloroform by replacement of one atom of chlorin by an atom of iodin; it boils at 131 C. and does not solidify.
  • Chloriodolipol (klo-ri-o-do-lip'-ol). A com- bination of creasote and chlorinated phenols, a disinfectant and antiseptic; in surgery, 2 to 3 % solution is employed; for inhalation in diseases of the air-passages, 5 % solution.
  • Chloroalbumin (klo-ro-al f -bu-min). A deriva- tive of peptone, protogen, or albumoses by action of chlorin.
  • Chlorobrom (klo'-ro-brom) (chlorin; bromin). A solution each ounce of which contains 30 grains of chloralamid and of potassium bromid. It is hypnotic and useful in sea-sickness.
  • Chlorobromhydrin (klo-ro-brom-hi f -drin). A substance formed from glycerol by replace- ment of two molecules of hydroxy! with one atom of chlorin and one of bromin. Syn., Allyl chlorobromhydrin.
  • Chlorodyne (klo'-ro-din) (chlorin; dduvq, pain). An English proprietary remedy sup- posed to contain chloroform, ether, morphin, cannabis indica, hydrocyanic acid, and cap- sicum. It is anodyne and narcotic. Dose 10-30 min. (0.65-2.0 Cc).
  • Chloroformin (klo-ro-form'-in). A poison extracted by Auclair from tubercle bacilli. Syn., Chloroformobacillin.
  • Chloroformism (klo f -ro-form-izm) (chloroform), 1. The use of chloroform to excess for its narcotic effect. 2. The symptoms produced by this use of the drug.
  • Chloroformization (klo-ro-form-i-za'-shun). 1. The act of administering chloroform as an anesthetic. 2. The anesthetic results from the inhalation of chloroform.
  • Chlorol (klo r -roV). A solution of sodium chlorid, mercury bichlorid, and hydrochloric acid, each, 1 part, and 3^ of copper sulfate in 100 parts of water; it is disinfectant and antiseptic.
  • Chlorolin (klo'-ro-lin). A solution said to consist mainly of the chlorphenols; recom- mended as a disinfectant and as an antiseptic wash in 2 to 3 % solution.
  • Chloroma (klo-ro'-mali) (yXcupoc, green; o;xa, a tumor). "Green cancer"; a rare va- riety of sarcoma, of a greenish tint, usually seated upon the periosteum of the bones of the head.
  • Chlorophan (klo r -ro-fan) (%Xcop6f, green; q^ahecv, show). A yellowish-green chromophan. See Chromophan.
  • Chlorophthisis (klo-ro-ti f -sis). Pulmonary tu- berculosis associated with chlorosis.
  • Cholecystectomy (kol-e-sist-os' -to-me) (chole- cyst; azo/ia, mouth). The establishment of an opening into the gall-bladder.
  • Cholecystotomy (kol-e-sist-ot' -o-me) (cholecyst; TSit>etv, to cut). Incision of the gall-bladder to remove gall-stones, etc.
  • Choledocholithiasis (kol-e-dok-o-lith-i' -as-is) (choledochus; lithiasis). The formation of a cal- culus in the common bile-duct.
  • Choledocholithotomy (kol-e-dok-o-lith-ot f -o- me) (choledochus; lithotomy). The incision of the common bile-duct for the removal of gall-stones.
  • Choledochotomy (kol-ed-o- kot'- o - me) (chole- dochus; rofxrj, section). An incision into the - common bile-duct.
  • Choleglobin (kol-e-glo' -bin) (x°^V, bile; globin). Latschenberger's name for the antecedent of bile-pigment, resulting, in his estimation, from the decomposition of the coloring-mat- ter of blood.
  • Choleic (kol-e'-ik) (^oAtj, bile). Pertaining to the bile.
  • Cholelithiasis (kol-e-lith-i' '-as-is) (xoXtj, bile; lithiasis). The presence of, or a condition associated with, calculi in the gall-bladder or in a gall-duct.
  • Cholelithotomy (kol-e-lith-ot'-o-me) (chole- lithiasis; rifivecv, to cut). An incision for the removal of gall-stones.
  • Choleraic (kol-er-a'-ik) (cholera). Pertaining to or resembling cholera. C. Diarrhea, diarrhea characterized by a profuse, ex- hausting discharge of watery material.
  • Cholerase (kol'-er-dz). The special bacterio- lytic enzym of the cholera vibrio. Cf. Pyocyanase and Ty phase.
  • Choleric (kol'-er-ik). 1. Having abundant bile. 2. Applied to a temperament easily excited to anger. 3. Choleraic.
  • Cholerine (kol-er-en') (dim. of cholera). A mild form of Asiatic cholera, or the initial stage of a more severe form.
  • Cholero typhus (kol-er-o-ti'-fus). 1. See Chol- era-typhoid. 2. The most malignant type of Asiatic cholera.
  • Cholerythrin (kol-er-ith'-rin). See Bilirubin.
  • Cholestearin (kol-es-te'-ar-in). See Choles- terin.
  • Cholesteatoma (kol-es-te-at-o f -mah) (choles- terin; bp.a, tumor). A teratoid tumor con- taining plates of cholesterin, epithelial cells, hair, and other dermal structures, and occur- ring most frequently in the brain.
  • Cholestegnosis (kol-e-steg-no' -sis) (xoXjj, bile; azkyvcoocg, a making close). Thickening of the bile.
  • Cholesteremia, Cholesterinemia (kol-es-ter- e'-me-ah, kol-es-ter-in-e' '-me-ah) (cholesterin; aljia, blood). The morbid state resulting from the retention of cholesterin in the blood. The condition is probably due to the reten- tion of the bile-acids.
  • Cholesterilins (kol-es-ter' -il-ins) . Hydrocar- bons formed from cholesterin by action of con- centrated sulfuric acid, and supposed to stand in close relationship to the terpene group.
  • Choletelin (kol-e? '-el-in) (cholin; rrjXoc, com- pletion), C 16 H 18 N 2 6 . An amorphous, solu- ble, yellow pigment derived from biliru- bin. It is the final product of the oxidation of bile-pigments. It is readily soluble in alkalis, alcohol, and chloroform.
  • Choletherapy (kol-e-ther' '-ap-e) (cholin; 'therapy). The remedial use of bile. Choleuria (kol-e-u'-re-ah) (xoXi), bile; o&pov, urine). The presence of bile in the urine.
  • Cholic (kol'-ik) (xoXtj, bile). Pertaining to the bile. C. Acid. See Acid, Cholic.
  • Cholicele (kol'-is-el) (%oXij, bile; ktjXt), a tumor). A tumor of the gall-bladder, due to accumula- tion of bile.
  • Cholin (kol'-in) (xoXr), bile), C 5 H 15 N0 2 . A sub- stance found among the products of the de- composition of hog's bile and ox bile. It is also found in the extracts of the suprare- nals, and is a product of the decomposition of lecithin.
  • Choloidinic Acid (kol-oi-din'-ik), C 24 H 38 4 . A decomposition-product of cholic acid.
  • Chololith (koV -o-litK) (xoXrj, bile; Xcdoe, stone). A gall-stone.
  • Cholosis (kol-o'-sis) (xoXtj, bile). 1 . Any disease caused by or associated with a perversion of the biliary secretion. 2. Lameness. C. americana, yellow fever.
  • Chondral (kon'-dral) (chondrus). Cartilagin- ous; relating to or composed of cartilage.
  • Chondrification (kon-drif -ik-a' -shun) (chon- drus; facer e, to make). The process of being converted into cartilage.
  • Chondrin (kon'-drin) (chondrus). A substance obtained from the matrix of hyaline cartilage by boiling. It resembles gelatin in general properties, but differs from it in not being precipitated by tannic acid. C. Balls, -a substance found in cartilage and composed of chondromucoid and chondroitic acid.
  • Chondritis (kon-dri' -tis) (chondro-; tttf, in- flammation). Inflammation of a cartilage.
  • Chondro costal (kon-dro-kos'-tal) (chondro-; costa, a rib). Relating to the ribs and their cartilages.
  • Chondro cranium (kon-dro-kra'-ne-um) (chon- dro-; cranium). The cartilaginous cranium, as of the embryo.
  • Chondro dendron (kon-dro-den'-dron) (chondro-; dkvdpov, a tree). A genus of South American menispermaceous climbing plants. C. glaber- rimum and C. iomentosum are among the plants that furnish pareira .
  • Chondro phyte (kon' -dro -fit) (chondro-; urov, a plant). A fungous neoplasm springing from a cartilage.
  • Chondro tomy (kon-drot'-o-me) (see Chondro- tome). The division of a cartilage.
  • Chondro- (kon-dro-) (chondrus). A prefix mean- ing relating to cartilage.
  • Chondroblast (kon' -dro-blasf) (chondro-; (IXao- rof, germ). A cell of developing cartilage.
  • Chondrocoracoid (kon-dro-kor'-ak-oid). Re- lating to a costal cartilage and to the coracoid process of the scapula.
  • Chondrocrasis (kon-dro-kra f -sis) (chondro-; update, a mixing). The diseased state of the cartilages accompanying leprosy.
  • Chondrodialysis (kon-dro-di-al f -is-is) (chon- dro-; dialysis). The decomposition of cartilage.
  • Chondroepiphysis (kon-dro-ep-if'-is-is) (chon- dro-; epiphysis). A cartilage which later develops into a bony epiphysis.
  • Chondromucoid (kon-dro-mu'-koid). A mucin found in cartilage. Cf. Osseomucoid; Tendo- mucoid.
  • Chondromyoma (kon-dro-mi-o'-mah) (chon- dro-; myoma). A neoplasm presenting the characteristics of both chondroma and myoma.
  • Chondrophyma (kon-dro-fi'-mah) (chondro-; up.a, a growth). i. A tumor of a cartilage.
  • Chondroplast (kon' -dro-plast) . See Chondro- mas t.
  • Chondroporosis (kon-dro-por-o'-sis) (chon- dro-; nopoc, a passage). The thinning of cartilage by the formation of spaces, occur- ring during the process of ossification.
  • Chondrosarcoma (kon-dro-sar-ko'-mah) (chon- dro-; sarcoma). A tumor composed of car- tilaginous and sarcomatous tissue.
  • Chondrosis (kon-dro'-sis) (chondrus). 1. For- mation of cartilage. 2. A cartilaginous tumor.
  • Chondrosternal (kon-dro-ster'-nal). Pertain- ing to the sternum and costal cartilages.
  • Chondrosyndesmus (kon-dro-sin-dez'-mus) . See Synchondrosis.
  • Chondrotome (kon'-dro-tom) (chondro-; rkjivecv, to cut). An instrument for cutting cartilage.
  • Chordee (kor-de') (chorda). A painful curved erection of the penis with concavity down- ward. The corpus spongiosum being infil- trated from urethral inflammation, does not fill with blood during erection, and so acts like a bow-string.
  • Chorditis (kor-di' -tis) (chorda; czcc, inflamma- tion). Inflammation of a vocal band. C. nodosa, inflammatory growths occurring on the free edge of the vocal cord at the junc- tion of the anterior and middle third. Syn., Singers' nodes.
  • Chordurethritis (kor-du-re-thri'-tis). Chordee.
  • Chorea (ko-re'-ah) (^opeca, dancing).
  • Choreic (ko-re'-ik) (chorea). Relating to, of the nature of, or affected with chorea.
  • Choreiform (ko-re'-if-orm) (chorea; forma, form). Resembling chorea.
  • Choremania, Chore omania (ko-re-ma'-ne-ah, ko-re-o-ma'-ne-ah) (chorea; (lav'ca, madness). Synonym of Choromania.
  • Choriocapillaris (ko-re-o-kap-il-a'-ris) (chor- ion; capillus, a hair). The network of capillaries over the inner portion of the choroid coat of the eye.
  • Chorioid (ko'-re-oid). See Choroid.
  • Chorioidal (ko-re-oid'-al). See Choroid (2).
  • Chorioideal Tubercle (ko-re-oid' -e-al tu'-ber-kX) . See Choroid Tubercle.
  • Chorioideremia (ko-re-oid-er-e f -me-ah). See Choroideremia .
  • Chorioiditis (ko-re-oid^i'-tis). See Choroiditis.
  • Chorioma (ko-re-o' -mah) (chorion; op.a, tumor). A neoplasm developed from the chorion.
  • Chorionic (ko-re-on'-ik) (chorion). Relating to the chorion.
  • Chorionin (ko-re-on' '-in) . A name given by Bronchacourt (1902) to a preparation made from sheep's placenta by submitting it to pressure without heat. The juice thus ex- pressed is made palatable with syrup after being sterilized with ammonium fluorid; em- ployed as a galactagog.
  • Chorionitis (ko-re-on-i' '-tis) . See Scleroderma.
  • Chorioretinitis (ko-re-o-ret-in-i f -tis) . See Choroidoretinitis .
  • Choroideremia (ko-roid-er-e 1 '-me-ah) (choroid; iprj/iia, desolation). Absence of the choroid.
  • Choroidocyclitis (ko-roid-o -si-Mi' -tis) (choroid; kukXoc, a circle; czcc, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the choroid and of the ciliary body.
  • Choroidoiritis (ko-roid-o-i-ri'-tis) (choroid; iritis). Inflammation of the choroid and the iris.
  • Choroidoretinitis (ko-roid-o-rel-in-i'-tis) (cho- roid; retinitis). Choroiditis associated with retinitis. C, Ametropic, that caused by ametropia.
  • Choromania (ko-ro-ma' '-ne-ah) (%d>poc, a dance; fxavia, madness). A nervous disorder charac- terized by dancing or other rhythmic move- ments; epidemic chorea; dancing mania.
  • Choronosologia, Choronosology (ko-ro-no- sol-o'-je-ah, ko-ro-no-sol' -o-je) (%(bpoc, a region; voaoc, a disease ; koyoc, science). The science of the geographic distribution of diseases or of endemic diseases of some region.
  • Christison's Formula. A formula for esti- mating the amount of solids in the urine: multiply the last two figures of the specific gravity expressed in four figures by 2.33 (or by 2, Trapp; or by 2.2, Loebisch). This gives the amount of solids in every 1000 parts.
  • Chroatol (kro f -at-ol) , C 10 H 16 . 2HI. A greenish- yellow, crystalline substance obtained by action of turpentine on iodin; used in powder or ointment in treatment of skin diseases. Syn., Terpiniodohydrate.
  • Chromate (kro'-mdt) (xp cc, vision). Color-blindness.
  • Chromatic (kro-mat'-ik) (xpa>p.a, color). Relating to or 'possessing color. C. Aber- ration. See Aberration, Chromatic. C. Aud- ition, luminous sensations aroused by sound.
  • Chromatin (kro'-mat-in) (see Chromatic). The portion of the protoplasm of a cell that takes the stain, forming a delicate reticular network or plexus of fibrils permeating the achromatin of a cell. Syn., Karyomitome.
  • Chromatogenous (kro - mat - oj'- en - us) (chro- mato-; yevvav, to beget). Producing color.
  • Chromatolysis (kro-mat-ol'-is-is) (chromato-; Xuocc, a loosing). Flemming's term for the breaking-down of the nucleus at the death of the cell. Syn., Karyolysis.
  • Chromatophore (kro-mat'-o-for) (chromato-; 4>6poc, bearing). Any colored cell-plastid.
  • Chromatoplasm (kro-maf '-o-plazm) (chromato-; r.Xaap.a, anything formed). The substance of the chromatoplasts as distinguished from the other cell-substances, karyoplasm, cytoplasm, metaplasm, paraplasm, etc.
  • Chromatoplast (kro-maf -o-plast) . See Chro- matophore.
  • Chromo- (kro-mo-) (xpcXog, loving). Readily stained; easily ab- sorbing color.
  • Chromophobic (kro - mo - o' - bik) (chromo-; (f>6j3oc, fear). Not stainable; not readily ab- sorbing color. Cf. Chromophilous.
  • Chromophoric, Chromophorous (kro-mo f'-or- ik, kro-moj'-or-us). Applied to chromogenic bacteria in which the pigment is stored in the cell-protoplasm of the organism.
  • Chromophose (kro'-mo-fos) (chromo-; a\6c, navel). A varicose condition of the navel.
  • Cirsotomy (sir-sot' -o-me) (cirsoid; xep.vecv, to cut). Excision of a varix.
  • Cistern (sis' -tern) (cistema, a vessel; receptacle). i. A reservoir. 2. Any dilation of the space between the pia and arachnoid. C. of Pecquet, the receptaculum chyli. C, Sem- inal, the posterior cul'desac of the vagina. Syn., Receptaculum seminis.
  • Citrate (sit' -rat) (citric acid). Any salt of citric acid.
  • Citric (sit'-rik) (citrus). Pertaining to or de- rived from lemons or citrons. C. Acid. See Acid, Citric.
  • Citrol (sit'-rol). Silver citrate.
  • Citrophen (sit' -ro -fen), C 3 H 4 OH — CONH — OC 2 H 5 C 6 H 4 . Paraphenetidin citrate. It is antipyretic and antineuralgic. Dose 3-15 gr. (0.2-1.0 Gm.).
  • Citrullin (sit-ruV -in) . A resinoid from Citrul- lus colocynthis. It is a cathartic exten- sively used in veterinary practice. Syn., Amorphous colocynthidin; Colocynthidin.
  • Citrullus (sit-ruV -lus) (L.). A genus of the Cucurbitacece, comprising but two species, indi- genous to tropical Asia and southern Africa. C. colocynthis, the bitter cucumber or gourd, furnishes colocynth.
  • Citrurea (sit-ru'-re-ah). A combination of citric acid, urea, and lithium.
  • Citrus (sit'-rus) (L.). A genus of aurantiaceous trees. See Aurantium, Bergamot, Lime, Limo.
  • Cladosporium cancerogenes (klad-o-spo'-re- um kan-ser-oj'-en-ez). A fungus said to be the cause of carcinoma. Syn., Canceromyces.
  • Cladothrix (klad' -o-thriks) (nXadog, branch; dp!$, a hair). A genus of bacteria having long, apparently branching filaments.
  • Clamp (klamp) (Ger., Klampe). An instrument for compressing the parts in surgical opera- tions to prevent hemorrhage, etc.
  • Clap (klap) (OF., clapoir, a venereal sore). 'Gonorrhea. C. -threads, slimy threads con- sisting of mucus and pus-cells in the urine of gonorrheal patients.
  • Claret (klar'-et) (clarus, clear). A light wine of a red color.
  • Clarify (klar'-if-i) (clarus; facere, to make). To free a liquid or solution from insoluble substances; to make clear.
  • Clastic (klas f -tik) (nXaoToc, broken). Breaking up into fragments; causing division.
  • Clathrocystis (klath-ro-sis'-tis) (nXijdpa, a trellis; Kuaxcg , pouch). A genus of microor- ganisms with round or oval cells, forming zoogleae in the form of circular layers.
  • Claustrophilia (Maws-tro-fil' -e-ah) (claustrum; cXe~cv, to love). A morbid dread of open places; it is noted in neurasthenia.
  • Claustrophobia (Maws-tro-fo' -be-ah) (claustrum; (fidftof, fear). Morbid distress at being in a room or confined space.
  • Claustrum (Haws' -tr um) (L., "a barrier"). A layer of gray matter in the cerebrum to the outer side of the lenticular nucleus.
  • Clava (kla'-vah) (L., "a club" ). An enlarge- ment of the funiculus gracilis.
  • Clavate (Mav'-dt) (clava). Club-shaped or be- coming gradually thicker toward one end.
  • Claviceps (klav'-is-eps) (clava; caput, head). A genus of fungi. C. purpurea, the fungus producing the ergot of rye.
  • Clavicle (Mav'-ik-l) (clavicula; clavus, a key). The collar-bone. C. -crutch, Cole's device for supporting a broken clavicle; it is so furnished with pads and adjustments as to render bandaging unnecessary.
  • Clavicotomy (Mav-ik-ot' -o-me) (clavicle; tojxtj, a cutting). Surgical section of the clavicle.
  • Clavicula (Mav-ik'-u-lah). The clavicle. C. capitis, the projection formed by the ptery- goid and entopterygoid bones on the pleur- apophysis of the hemal arch of the nasal vertebra.
  • Clavicular (kla-vik' -u-lar) (clavicle). Relating to the clavicle.
  • Claviculate (Mav-ik'-u-lat). Having a clavicle.
  • Claviform (Mav'-e-form). See Clavate.
  • Clavipes (Mav'-e-pez) (clava; pes, a foot). Having club-shaped feet.
  • Clavis uteri (Ma' -vis u'-ter-i). Womb-key; an electrotherapeutic intrauterine device, de- signed for the application of electricity in certain pathologic conditions of the uterus and adnexa.
  • Cleidarthritis (kli-dar-thri'-tis) (xvU-Zf, clavicle ; arthritis). Inflammation of the sternocla- vicular articulation.
  • Cleido- (kli-do-) (nXe'cc, clavicle). A pre- fix meaning pertaining to the clavicle. CLEIDOCOSTAL 285 CLONIC Cleidocostal (kli-do-kos'-tal). Pertaining to the ribs and the clavicle.
  • Cleidooccipital (kli-do-ok-sip' -it-al) Relating to the clavicle and occiput. C. Muscle. See under Muscle.
  • Cleidotomy (kli-dot f -o-me) (cleido-; xep.ve.cv, to cut). The operation of dividing the clavicles in cases of difficult labor due to the broad shoulders of the child.
  • Cleptomania (klep-to-ma'-ne-ah). See Klep- tomania.
  • Climatology (kli-mat-oV -o-)e) (nkcpa, climate; Xoyoc, science). The science of climate.
  • Clinic (klin'-ik) (kXcvckoc, pertaining to a bed). i. Medical instruction given at the bedside, or in the presence of the patient whose symptoms are studied and whose treatment is considered. 2. A gathering of instructors, students, and patients for the study and treatment of disease.
  • Clinical (klin' -ik-al) (clinic). Relating to bed- side treatment or to a clinic.
  • Clinicopathology (klin -ik -0 - path - ol'-o - je) (clinic; pathology. Pathologic conditions as open to clinical observation.
  • Clino- (klin-o-) (icXiveev, to incline). A prefix denoting inclination or declination.
  • Clinocephalus (klin-o -sef'-al- us) (clino-; «£(f)aXr), the head). A variety of dolicho- cephalus occurring through synostosis of the sphenoparietal suture and resulting in a saddle-formed depression of the skull. Syn., Saddle-head.
  • Clinodiagonal (hlin-o-di-ag' -on-al) (clino-; diagonal). Inclined and diagonal; obliquely transverse.
  • Clinoid (klin'-oid) \kXLvt), a bed; eldoc", like- ness). Resembling a bed; applied to sundry bony structures of the body, as the clinoid processes. C. Processes. See under Process.
  • Clinology (klin-ol'-o-je) (clino-; Xoyoc, science). 1. The science of the decline of animal life after it has reached the meridian. 2. The study of beds for the sick.
  • Clinometer (klin - om' - et - er) (clino-; phpov, a measure). An apparatus to estimate the rotational capacity of the ocular muscles. C, Duane's, a device for estimating tor- sional deviations of the eye, and also used in the study of metamorphopsia.
  • Clinoscope (klin'-o-skop) (clino-; okotzsiv, to view). An instrument for measuring the torsion of the eyes when gazing at a fixed object with the axes of vision presumably parallel.
  • Clinotechny (klin-o' -tek-ne) (kXcvi), a bed; Tiyyt), an art). The art of making and pre- paring beds for the sick.
  • Cliseometer (klis-e-om' -et-er) (kX!o!c, inclina- tion; phpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring the degree of inclination of the pelvic axis.
  • Clition (klit'-e-on) (kAct&c, a slope). A cranio- metric point located in the middle of the ' anterior border of the clivus ossis.
  • Clitoridectomy (kli-tor-id-ek'-to-mc) (clitoris; £K7op.T), excision). Excision of the clitoris.
  • Clivus (kli'-vus) (L., "a slope"). A slope. C. ossis, C. of Blumenbach, the slanting surface of the body of the sphenoid bone between the sella turcica and the basilar process of the occipital bone.
  • Clostridium (klos-trid' '-e-um) (kXojottjp, a spin- dle). A genus of bacteria differing from bacilli in the fact that their spores are formed in enlarged rods.
  • Closure (klo'-zhilr) (clausura, a closing). The act of completing or closing an electric circuit.
  • Clot (klot) (AS., elate, a bur). A peculiar solidification of the blood, such as takes place when it is shed. It is due to the formation of fibrin, which entangles the blood-corpuscles and, contracting, squeezes out the liquid portion of the blood.
  • Clownism (klown'-izm) (Icel., klunni, a boorish fellow). That stage of hystero- epilepsy in which there is an emotional dis- play with a remarkable series of contortions.
  • Club-moss (klub'-mos). See Lycopodium.
  • Clumping (klump' -ing) . See Agglutination (2). C. Serum. See under Serum.
  • Clupein (klu' '-pe-in) (clupea, a kind of small river-fish), C 30 H 57 N 17 O 6 + 4H 2 0. A protamin from the herring. Syn., Salmin.
  • Clysis (Mi' -sis) (kXu^iv, to cleanse). The ad- ministration of an enema; the cleansing by means of an enema.
  • Clysma (kliz'-mah). See Clyster.
  • Clysmic (kliz'-mik). Relating to an enema; suitable for cleansing or washing.
  • Cnemoscoliosis (ne-mo-sko-le-o'-sis) (Kvfjfi-q, the leg; oKoXcog, curved). Lateral curvature of the legs.
  • Coagulation (ko-ag-u-la'-shun) (coagulum). The formation of a coagulum or clot, as in blood or in milk.
  • Coagulative (ko-ag'-u-la-tiv) (coagulum). Causing or marked by coagulation. C. Ne- crosis. See Necrosis, Coagulative.
  • Coagulin (ko-ag' -u-lin) (coagulum). A sub- stance endowed with capacity to precipitate certain albuminous bodies contained in the COAGULOMETER 287 COCAIN culture-fluid injected into an inoculated ani- mal.
  • Coagulometer (ho-ag-u-lom' -et-er) (coagulum; fihpov, a measure). An apparatus for the determination of the rapidity of coagulation of the blood. C, Wright's, a cylinder sur- rounded by pockets for thermometer and coagulation-tubes.
  • Coagulum (ko-ag' -u-lum) (coagulare, to curdle). A clot. The mass of fibrin, inclosing red and colorless corpuscles and serum, that forms from the blood after the latter has been drawn from the body. Also, the curd of milk and the insoluble form of albumin.
  • Coalescence (ko-al-es' '-ens) (coalescere, to grow together). The union of two or more parts or things previously separate.
  • Coalescent (ko-al-es' -ent) . In a condition of coalescence.
  • Coalitus (ko-al-i'-tus) (L.). Coalescent; coal- escence. C. artuum, adhesion of limbs to each other. See Ankylomele.
  • Coarctate (ko-ark'-tat) (coarctare, to press to- gether). Crowded together.
  • Coarctation (ko-ark-ta'-shun) (coarctate). A compression of the walls of a vessel or canal, narrowing or closing the lumen; reduction of the normal or previous volume, as of the pulse; shriveling and consequent detachment, as of the retina. A stricture.
  • Coarse (kors) (ME., course). Not fine; gross. C. Adjustment. See Adjustment, Coarse. C. Features of Disease, macroscopic organic lesions, such as swelling, hemorrhage, etc.
  • Coca (ko'-kah). See Erythroxylon.
  • Cocaethylin (ko-kah-eth' '-il-in) , C 18 H 23 N0 4 . A white powder obtained from benzoylecgonin by action of ethyl iodid. It is soluble in alcohol and ether and almost insoluble in water; it is a local anesthetic, milder than cocain. Syn., Benzoylecgoninethylic ester; Elhylbenzoylecgonin; Homococain.
  • Cocapyrin (ko-ka-pi' -rin) . A mixture of cocain, 1 part; antipyrin, 100 parts; used as an analgesic and antipyretic. Dose 3^ gr. (0.22 Gm.).
  • Coccidiosis (kok-sid-i' -o-sis) (coccidium; vboog, disease). The group of symptoms produced by the presence of coccidia in the body.
  • Coccinella (kok-sin-el' -ah) . See Cochineal.
  • Coccineous (kok-sin' '-e-us) (coccinus, scarlet). In color, pure carmin tinged with yellow.
  • Coccobacillus (kok-o-ba-siV -us) . See under Bac- teria.
  • Coccobacteria (kok-o-bak-te' '-re-ah) (coccus; fiaKTTjpcov, a little rod). The rod-like or spheroid bacteria found in putrefying liquids, and called C. septica. See under Bacteria.
  • Coccogenous (kok-oj'-en-us) (coccus; jevvdv, to produce)^ Caused by the presence of pus- cocci.
  • Cocculus indicus (kok'-u-lus in'-dik-us). The dried fruit of Anamirta cocculus. It is an active narcotic poison. It is employed as a destroyer of vermin. See Picrotoxin.
  • Coccus (kok'-us) (kokkoc, a berry). 1. A genus of insects including C. cacti, the cochineal insect. 2. A spheric bacterium — a micro- coccus.
  • Coccycephalus (kok-se-sef -al-us) (coccyx; K£(f)aXrj, the head). 1. Having a beaked process for a head. 2. A monstrosity with such a head.
  • Coccydynia (kok-se-din'-e-ah). See Coccy- godynia.
  • Coccygeus (kok-sij f -e-us) (coccyx). One of the pelvic muscles. See under Muscle.
  • Coccygodynia (kok-sig-o-din'-e-ah) (coccyx; oduvrj, pain). Pain referred to the region of the coccyx; confined almost exclusively to women who have given birth to chil- dren.
  • Coccyx (kok'-siks) (kokku£, cuckoo (resembling the bill)). The last bone of the spinal column, formed by the union of four rudimentary vertebras.
  • Cochinilin (kotch-in-il f -in) . The same as Carminic acid.
  • Cochlear, Cochleare (kok'-le-ar, kok-le-a' -re) (L.). A spoon; a spoonful. C. magnum, a tablespoon. C. medium, a dessertspoon. C. minimum, a teaspoon.
  • Cochleariform (kok-le-ar' -e-form) (cochlear; forma, shape), i. Spoon-shaped. 2. (nS^^of, a conch-shell.) Having the shape of a snail- shell.
  • Cocinin (ko' 'sin-in) . A peculiar fatty principle, the chief constituent of cocoanut oil. Syn., Cocin; Cocostearin; Cocostearyl; Cocyl.
  • Cockroach (kok' '-rock) . See Blatta.
  • Coco (ko f -ko). See Coko Disease.
  • Cocoa, Coco (ko'-ko). See Cacao and Theo- broma. C. -butter. See Cacao-butter.
  • Cod (kod) (ME.). The Gadus morrhua, a fish furnishing cod-liver oil. C. -liver Oil, an oil derived from the liver of the Gadus morrhua, and ranging in color, according to the method of its preparation, from pale straw to dark brown; its specific gravity is 0.923 to 0.924 or even 0.930 at i5°C. See Morrhua.
  • Codeia (ko-de'-ah). See Codein.
  • Coelom, Cceloma (se'-lom, se-lo'-mah). See Celom.
  • Coelongate (ko-e-lon' -gat) (con, together; elon- gatus, elongated). Of equal length.
  • Coenesthesis (sen -es- the' -sis). See Ceneslhe- sis.
  • Coercible (ko-ers' -ib-il) (coercerg, to curb). Applied to gases which are capable of being liquefied.
  • Coercive (ko-ers'-iv). Capable of being ren- dered magnetic and continuing so.
  • Coetaneous ' (ko-et-a' -ne-us) (con, together; cetas, age). Reaching maturity simultane- ously.
  • Coffea (kof'-e-ah). The coffee tree. C. ara- bica, the common coffee plant, is the original source of most of the coffee cultivation.
  • Coffee (kof'-e). See Coffea. C. -ground Vomit, the material ejected by emesis in gastric carcinoma and other conditions that give rise to a slow hemorrhage into the stomach. It consists of blood changed by the action of the gastric juice, and mixed with other contents of the stomach.
  • Coffeon (kof'-e-on). A product obtained by condensing the material volatilized when coffee is roasted. The pleasant flavor of coffee is due to it.
  • Cognac (kon-yak) (a district in France). French brandy distilled from wines produced in the district of Cognac.
  • Cohabitation (ko-hab-it-a' -shun) (con, together; habitare, to dwell). 1. The living together of a man and woman, with or without legal marriage. 2. Sexual connection.
  • Cohesion (ko-he r -zhun) (cohecrere, to stick together). The force whereby molecules of matter adhere to one another; the attraction of aggregation.
  • Cohosh (ko'-hosh) (Am. Ind.). A name given to several medicinal plants. C, Black. See Cimicifuga. C, Red. See Actcea rubra. C, White. See Actcea alba.
  • Coin-sign, Coin-test (koin'-sln, koin'-test). See Bell-sound.
  • Coinosite (ko-in f -o-slt) (kocvoc, common; ocx- £~cv, to feed). An animal parasite capable of separating itself from its host at will; a free commensal organism.
  • Coition (ko-ish' -un) . Same as Coitus.
  • Coitophobia (ko-it-o-fo f -be-ah) (coitus; 4>6ftoc, fear). Morbid dread of coitus from disgust or dyspareunia.
  • Coitus (ko'-it-us) (coire, to come together). The act of sexual connection; copulation.
  • Coko Disease (ko'-ko). A name applied in the Fiji Islands to a disease resembling fram- besia.
  • Cola-nut (ko'-lah-nut). See Kola-nut.
  • Colauxe (kol-awks' -e) (koXov, colon; au^f), in- crease). Distention of the colon.
  • Colchicein (kol-chis-e' -in) (colchicum), C 17 H 21 - NO s + 2H 2 0. A crystalline decomposition- product of colchicin. It is used subcutane- ously in treatment of gout. Dose gV" 3V gr. (0.001-0.002 Gm.).
  • Colchicin (koV -chis-in) (colchicum), C 22 H 25 NO e , colchicina (U. S. P.). An alkaloid of colchi- cum; it is a pale, brownish-yellow, exceed- ingly bitter powder, freely soluble in water. It is a very active poison. Its dose is y$ gr. (0.0032 Gm.) hypodermatically. C. Sali- cylate. See Colchisal.
  • Colchiflor (kol f -chi-flor). A remedy for gout prepared from a tincture made from the fresh flowers of Colchicum autumnale and powdered kola. It is said to be free from the drastic properties contained in prepara- tions from the bulb and seeds of colchicum.
  • Colchisal (koV -chis-al) . Colchicin salicylate. A yellow, amorphous powder, soluble in alcohol, ether, and water. It is used in gout and arthritis. Dose T ^ ¥ gr. (0.00065 Gm.).
  • Colectomy (ko-lek'-to-me) (colon; hro/ir), cut- ting out). Excision of a portion of the colon.
  • Colibacillosis (ko-le-bas-il-o' '-sis) . The morbid condition due to infection with Bacterium coli. COLIBACTERIURIA 291 COLLES' FASCIA Colibacteriuria (ko-le-bak-te-re-u' -re-ah). The presence in the urine of Bacterium coli.
  • Colicolitis (ko-le-kol-i' -tis) . See Dysentery.
  • Colicystitis (ko-le-sist-i' '-tis) (colon; kuotcc, blad- der; exec, inflammation). Cystitis dependent upon the pathogenic activity of the colon bacillus.
  • Colicystopyelitis (ko-le- sist -o-pi-e- W - tis) . Combined cystitis and pyelitis due to Bacillus coli communis.
  • Coliform (kol'-e-form) (colum, a sieve; forma, form). Sieve-like.
  • Colipuncture (ko-le-punk'-chur) . See Colocen- tesis.
  • Collacin, Collastin (kol'-as-in, -tin). A sub- stance found abundant, by Unna, in colloid degeneration of the skin.
  • Collaform (kol'-a-orm). A formaldehyd-gel- atin preparation intended as a vulnerary.
  • Collagen (kol'-aj-en) (noXXa, glue; yevvdv, to produce). A substance existing in various tissues of the body, especially bone and car- tilage; it is converted into gelatin by boiling.
  • Collapsing (kol-aps 1 '-in g) (collapse). Suddenly breaking down. C. Pulse. See Corrigan's Pulse.
  • Collargol, Collargolum (kol-ar'-gol, kol-ar'-gol- um). See Silver, Colloidal.
  • Collateral (kol-al'-er-al) (con, together; lateralis, of the side). 1. Accessory or secondary; not direct or immediate. 2. One of the first branches of an axis-cylinder of a nerve-cell passing at a right angle.
  • Collemia, Collaemia (kol-e' -me-ah) (nolla, glue; alfia, blood). Haig's term for a condition of capillary obstruction which he attributes to a clogging of the capillaries by urates or col- loid deposits.
  • Collidin (kol'-id-in) (noXXa, glue), C 8 H n N. A ptomain, isomeric but not identical with colli- din aldehyd. The ptomain was obtained from pancreas and gelatin allowed to putrefy together in water. C. Aldehyd. See Al- dehyd, Collidin.
  • Colligamen (kol-ig'-a-men) (colligare, to bind), i. A ligament. 2. A name given to a variety of bandages prepared with glycerol and a glycerol-zinc paste.
  • Collin (kol'-in) (noXXa, glue). Gelatin in soluble form.
  • Collinic (kol-in'-ik). Relating to or obtained from gelatin.
  • Colliquation (kol-ik-wa' -shun) (con, together; liquare, to melt). The liquefaction or break- ing down of a tissue or organ.
  • Colliquative (kol-ik' -wa-tiv) (colliquation). Profuse or excessive; marked by excessive fluid discharges. C. Diarrhea, a profuse watery diarrhea. C. Necrosis. See Necrosis, Liquej active. C. Sweat, a profuse clammy sweat.
  • Colloidin (kol-oid' -in) (colloid), C 9 H 15 N0 6 . A jelly-like substance obtained from colloid tissue.
  • Colloma (kol-o' -mah) (noXXa, glue; ofia, a tumor). A cystic tumor containing a gel- atiniform substance.
  • Collosin (kol'-o-sin) (noXXa, glue). A skin- varnish made by the addition of camphor to acetone collodion.
  • Collum (kol'-um) (L.). The neck; espe- cially the anterior part of the neck. C. dis- tortum. Synonym of Torticollis.
  • Collutory (koV -u-to-re) (colluere, to rinse). A gargle or mouth -wash.
  • Collyrium (kol-ir' -e-um) (noXXuptov, an eye- salve). A lotion for the eyes.
  • Colocentesis (kol-o -sen-te' -sis) (colon; Kevzrjocc, puncture). Surgical puncture of the colon.
  • Colocholecystostomy (ko-lo-kol-e-sis-tos' '-to- me). See Cholecystocolotomy.
  • Colocleisis (ko-lo-kW -sis) (colon; kXs'cocc, closure). Occlusion of the colon.
  • Coloclyster (ko-lo-klis'-ter) (colon; clyster). An enema in the colon.
  • Colocolostomy (ko-lo-kol-os'-to-me). The oper- ation of forming a connection between two portions of the colon.
  • Colocynth (kol'-o-sinth). Same as Colocynthis.
  • Colocynthidism (kol-o -sinth' -id-izm) (colocyn- this). Poisoning from undue use of colocynth. A condition marked by violent inflammation of the digestive tract, watery and bloody stools, bilious vomiting, cramps in the calves of the legs, and collapse.
  • Colocynthin (kol-o -sin' -thin) (colocynthis). The bitter principle of colocynth. See Colo- cynthis.
  • Coloenteritis (ko-lo-en-ter-i'-tis) (colon; en- teritis). Inflammation of the small and large intestine. See Enterocolitis.
  • Colomba, Colombo (kol-om'-bah, kol-om f -bo). See Calumba.
  • Colon (ko'-lon) (koXov, the colon). The part of the large intestine beginning at the cecum and terminating at the end of the sigmoid flexure. In the various parts of its course it is known as the ascending colon, the trans- verse colon, the descending colon, and the sigmoid flexure.
  • Colonometer (kol-on-om' -e-ter) (colony; pkxpov, a measure). An apparatus for estimating the number of colonies of bacteria on a culture-plate.
  • Colonoscope (ko-lon'-o-skop) (colon; onoizelv, to view). An instrument for examining the colon.
  • Colony (kol'-o-ne) (colonia, colony). A collec- tion or assemblage, as of microorganisms in a culture.
  • Colopexia, Colopexy (ko-lo-peks'-e-ah, ko'-lo- pek-se) (colon; tz^cc, a fixing). Suturing of the sigmoid flexure to the abdominal wall. .
  • Colopexotomy (ko-lo-peks-ot'-o-me) (colon; n^cc, a fixing; zipvsiv, to cut). Incision into and fixation of the colon.
  • Colophony (kol'-o-fo-ne) (KoXocpcbv, a city of Ionia). Rosin. The solid residue left on distilling off the volatile oil from crude turpentine. See Rosin.
  • Coloptosis (ko-lo-to'-sis) (colon; tztcoocc, a falling). Descent or displacement of the colon.
  • Colorimetric (kol-or-im-et'-rik). Relating to methods of color -measuring.
  • Colostomy (ko-los'-to-me) (colon; o-opa, a mouth). 1. The formation of an artificial anus by an opening into the colon. 2. Any surgical operation upon the colon that makes a permanent opening into it, whether internal or external.
  • Colotomy (ko-lot'-o-me) (colon; xkp.ve.tv, to cut). Incision of the colon, abdominal, lateral, lum- bar, or iliac, according to the region of en- trance.
  • Colotyphoid (ko-lo-ti'-foid). Typhoid accom- panied with follicular ulceration of the colon and lesions in the small intestine.
  • Colpeurynter (kol-pu-rin'-ter) (koX-oc, vagina; eupuvscv, to widen). An inflatable bag or sac used for dilating the vagina and the cervix.
  • Colpeurysis (kol-pu' -ris-is) (see Colpeurynter). Dilation of the vagina, especially that effected by means of the colpeurynter.
  • Colpitis (kol-pi' -tis) (koX-oc, vagina; iTt£ y inflammation). Inflammation of the vagina.
  • Colpo cystoplasty (kol-po-sisf -o-plas-te) (col- po-; kugtcc, bladder; r.Xaooecv, to form). Plastic surgery of the vagina and bladder.
  • Colpo- (kol-po-) (koIt.oc, vagina). A prefix denoting relation to the vagina.
  • Colpoceliotomy (kol-po-se-le-ot'-o-me) (colpo-; celiotomy). Vaginal celiotomy. C, Antero- lateral, Diihrssen's name for a new vaginal operative route into the abdomen. It con- sists in a combination of vaginal celiotomy with complete division of one broad ligament.
  • Colpocleisis (kol-po-kW -sis) (colpo-; nXelocc, a closure). The surgical closure of the vagina.
  • Colpocystoureterocystotomy (kol-po-sist-o-u- re-ter-o-sist-ot' -o-me) (colpo-; koo-cc, bladder; ureter; cystotomy). Exposure of the orifices of the ureter by incision of the walls of the bladder and vagina.
  • Colpodesmorrhaphy (kol -po - des - mor' - af-e) (colpo-; dcopoc, a fastening; pacfrrj, a seam). Suturing of the vaginal sphincter.
  • Colpohysterectomy (kol-po-his-ter-ek' -to-me) (colpo-; hysterectomy). Removal of the uterus through the vagina.
  • Colpohysteropexy (kol - po - his' - ter-o-pek- se) (colpo-; hysteropexy). Vaginal hysteropexy; supravaginal amputation of the cervix and anastomosis of the uterus and the vaginal mucosa. Syn., Hysteropexy vaginalis.
  • Colpomyomectomy (kol-po-mi-o-mek' '-to-me) (colpo-; myomectomy). Myomectomy through the vagina.
  • Colpomyotomy (kol-po-mi-of -o-me) . m See Col- pomyomectomy.
  • Colpoperineorrhaphy (kol-po-per-in-e-or f -af-e) (colpo-; perineorrhaphy). Repair of a perineal laceration by denuding and in part suturing the posterior wall of the vagina.
  • Colpoptosis (kol-po-to' -sis) (colpo-; izxcoat^, a falling). Prolapse of the vaginal walls.
  • Colporrhaphy (kol-por' '-a-fe) (colpo-; paip- ecv, to bear). A genus of shrubs and trees of the order Burseracece, found in Africa and the East Indies. C. africanum yields African bdellium. C. agallocha yields In- dian bdellium. C. myrrha yields myrrh. C. opobalsamum yields balsam of Mecca or of Gilead.
  • Commissura (kom-is-u'-rah). See Commis- sure. C. magna, the corpus callosum. C. magna cerebelli, the superior peduncles of the cerebellum. C. maxima, C. maxima cerebri, the corpus callosum.
  • Commissural (kom-is'-u-ral) (commissure). Having the properties of a commissure; uniting symmetric parts, as commissural fibers of the brain.
  • Communicans (kom-u' '-nik-ans) (L.). i. Com- municating; 2. Alternating; connecting. C. noni. See under Nerve. C. willisii. See Artery, Communicating, Posterior.
  • Commutator (kom r -u-ta-tor) (commutare, to exchange). An instrument for automatically interrupting or reversing the flow of an elec- tric current.
  • Compatibility (kom-pat-ib-iV '-it-e) (Fr., com- patibilite). Of medicines, the relation of one substance to another, so that they may be mixed without chemic change or loss of therapeutic power.
  • Compensating (kom r -pen-sa-ting) (see Com- pensation). Making good a deficiency. C. COMPENSATION 296 CONCENTRIC Ocular. See under Ocular. C. Operation, in ophthalmology, tenotomy of the associated antagonist in cases of diplopia from paresis of one of the ocular muscles.
  • Compensation (kom-pen-sa' -shun) (compen- sare, to equalize). The act of making good a deficiency; the state of counterbalancing a functional or structural defect.
  • Compensatory (kom-pen' 'sa-to-re) (see Com- pensation). Making good a deficiency. Restoring the balance, after failure of one organ or part of an organ, by means of some other organ or part of an organ.
  • Complaint (kom-pldnt') (complangere, to la- ment). A disease or ailment. C, Bowel-, diarrhea. C, Summer-, summer diarrhea.
  • Complemental, Complementary (kom-ple- ' men'-tal, kom-ple-men' -ta-re) (complement). Supplying a deficiency. C. Air. See Air, Complemental. C. Colors, a term applied to any two colors which combined produce white light, as, e. g., blue and yellow.
  • Complemented (kom-ple-ment r -oid). That substance which results from the destruction of a complement (q. v.); it can go to form an anticomplement.
  • Complementophil (kom-ple-menf '-o-fil) . The haptophore group of the intermediary body by means of which it combines with the com- plement.
  • Complementophilic (kom-ple-ment-o-fil'-ik). Showing a special affinity for the complement.
  • Complexus (kom-pleks'-us) (L., "complex"). The totality of symptoms, phenomena, or signs of a morbid condition. C. Muscle. See under Muscle. ■* Complication (kom-plik-a' '-shun) (complicare, to fold together). A disease occurring in the course of some other disease and more or less dependent upon it.
  • Compos mentis (Jkom'-pos men'-tis) (L.). Of sound mind.
  • Composite (kom-poz' -it) (compound). Composed of distinct portions.
  • Compression (kom-presh f -un) (compress). The state of being compressed. C. -atrophy, atrophy of a part from constant compression. C. -myelitis. See Myelitis, Compression-.
  • Compressor (kom-pres' -or) (compress). 1. An instrument for compressing an artery, vein, etc. 2. A term applied to muscles having a compressing function. C. sacculi laryngis, the inferior arytenoepiglottideus •muscle. See under Muscle. C. urethrae. See under Muscle.
  • Conalbumin (kon-aV -bu-min) . A proteid body obtained by Osborne and Campbell from white of egg, and so designated "on account of its close relation in properties and com- position to ovalbumen." C H N S O 52.25$ 6.99$ 26.11$ 1.70$ 22.95$ Cf. Ovalbumen; Ovomucin; Ovomucoid.
  • Conarium (ko-na'-re-um) (Kcovapcov; dim. of Kcbvoc, a cone). The pirleal gland.
  • Concave (kon-kdv') (com, together; cavus, hol- low). Hollow; incurved, as the inner sur- face of a hollow sphere.
  • Concavoconvex (kon-ka-vo-kon-veks') . Having one surface concave, the other convex, the convexity exceeding the concavity. See Lens, Concavoconvex.
  • Conceive (kon-sev') (concipere, to take in). To become pregnant.
  • Concentration (kon-sen-tra' '-shun) (com, to- gether; centrum, the center). 1. The act of making denser, as of a mixture, by evapor- ating a part of the liquid. 2. Afflux toward a part.
  • Concentric (kon-sen'-trik). Arranged in an equidistant manner about a center. C. Hy- CONCEPTION 297 CONDYLE pertrophy of the Heart, increase in the muscular texture of the heart, the capacity of the cavities remaining unchanged.
  • Conchinin (kon' -kin-in) . See Quinidin.
  • Conchoscope (kong f -ko-skop) (concha; oKonelv, to inspect). A speculum and mirror for inspecting the nasal cavity.
  • Conchotome (kong'-ko-tdm) (concha; to/ij?, a cutting). An instrument for the surgical removal of the middle turbinated bone.
  • Concomitant (kon-kom 1 '-it-ant) (concomitari, to accompany). Accompanying. C. Stra- bismus. See under Strabismus. C. Symp- toms, symptoms that are not in themselves essential to the course of a disease, but that may occur in association with the essential symptoms.
  • Concrescence (kon-kres'-ens) (com, together; crescere, to grow). 1. See Concretion (3). 2. Held's term for the plunging of the terminal of one neuron deep into the cell-body of another. C. of Teeth, a growing together of the roots of two teeth after complete de- velopment.
  • Concretion (kon-kre' -shun) (see Concrescence). 1. The solidification or condensation of a fluid substance. 2. A calculus. 3. A union of parts normally separate, as the fmgers.
  • Condenser (kon-den 1 '-ser) . A lens or combina- tion of lenses used in microscopy for gathering and concentrating rays of light.
  • Conduction (kon-d.uk' -shun) (see Conductor), The passage or transfer of force or material from one part to another.
  • Condylarthrosi^ (kon-dil-ar -thro' -sis) (condyle; apdpov, a joint). A form of diarthrosis wherein a condyle is set in a shallow and elliptic cavity and free and varied move- ment of the joint is possible; condylar articulation.
  • Condyle (kon'-dil) (novdoXoc, a knuckle). Any rounded eminence such as occurs in the CONDYLECTOMY 298 CONGO RED joints of many of the bones, especially the femur, humerus, and lower jaw.
  • Condylectomy (kon-dil-ek' -to-me) (condyle; i/CTOfxr), excision). Excision of a condyle.
  • Condylion (kon-diV '-e-on) (condyle). In crani- ometry, the point at the lateral tip of the condyle of the jaw.
  • Condyloid (kon' -dil-oid) (condyle; ddoc, like- ness). Resembling or pertaining to a con- dyle.
  • Condylosis (kon-dil-o' -sis). The formation of a condyloma.
  • Confection (kon-fek' '-shun) (confectio, a prepa- ration). In pharmacy, a mass of sugar and water, or of honey, used as an excipient with a prescribed medicinal substance.
  • Confertus (kon-fer' -tus) (conjercire, to press close together). Pressed together, dense, crowded; applied to cutaneous eruptions.
  • Confinement (kon-fin' -ment) (com, together; finis, boundary; limit). The condition of women during childbirth.
  • Confluent (kon' -fiu-ent) (confiuere, to flow to- gether). Running together. ( The opposite of discrete. In anatomy, coalesced or blended ; applied to two or more bones originally separate, but subsequently formed into one.
  • Confrontation (kon- fron-ta' -shun) (conjrontari, to be contiguous to). The examination of a person by whom a diseased person may have been infected as a means of diagnosing the disease in the latter.
  • Confusion (kon-fu f -zhun) (com, together; fundere, to pour). Mixing; confounding. C. Colors, a set of colors so chosen that they cannot be distinguished by one who is color-blind. C. Letters, test-type letters, such as C, G, O, or F, P, T, liable to be mistaken for one another.
  • Congelation (kon-jel-a' -shun) (congelatio, a freezing). 1. Freezing; frost-bite; intense cold or its effect on the animal economy or any organ or part. 2. The chilling or be- numbing effect of any freezing-mixture or application; mainly employed for its local anesthetic effect. 3. Coagulation.
  • Congenerous (kon-jen'-er-us) (congener, of the same race). Of the same genus. C. Mus- cles, muscles producing one action.
  • Congenital (kon-jen' -it-al) (com, together; gigni, to be born). Existing at birth.
  • Congestive (kon-jes' -tiv) (congestion). Marked by, due to, or of the nature of congestion.
  • Congius (kon-je'-us) (L.). A Roman measure; a gallon.
  • Conglomerate (kon-glom'-er-at) (conglomerare, to heap up). 1. Massed together; aggregated. 2. A mass of units without order. C. Glands, acinous glands.
  • Conglutin (kon-glu' -tin) (com, together; gluten, glue). One of the proteids found in peas, beans, and other kinds of pulse.
  • Conglutination (kon-glu-tin-a r -shun) (conglu- tinare, to glue together). The abnormal union of two contiguous surfaces or bodies, as of two fingers, or of the opposed surfaces of the pleural or pericardial sac.
  • Conic, Conical (kon'-ik, kon'-ik-al) (cone). Cone-shaped. C. Cornea. See Kerato globus.
  • Conicin (kon'-is-in). See Conin.
  • Coniin (ko-ni'-in). See Conin and Conium.
  • Coniism (ko-ni' -izm) (conium). Poisoning by conium. It begins with paralysis of the legs, which extends to the arms and respiratory muscles, leading to unconsciousness and death.
  • Conjugal (kon'-ju-gal) (com, together; jugare, to yoke). Pertaining to marriage; affecting both husband and wife. C. Diabetes, dia- betes affecting husband and wife together; this is said to be not infrequently observed.
  • Conoid, Conoidal (ko'-noid, ko-noi'-dal) (kojvoc, cone; eldoc, shape). Of a conic shape. C. Ligament, the lower and inner part of the coracoclavicular ligament. C. Tubercle, the eminence on the inferior surface of the clavicle to which the conoid ligament is attached.
  • Conquinamin (hon-k-win'-a-min). An alkaloid of cuprea-bark. CONRADI'S LINE 300 CONTRACTION Conradi's Line. A line drawn from the base of the xiphoid process to the point of the apex-beat, marking, under normal conditions, the upper limit of percussion-dulness of the left .lobe of the liver.
  • Conservation (kon-ser-va' '-shun) (conservare, to keep). Preservation without loss. C. of Energy. See under Energy.
  • Consolidation (kon-sol-id-a' '-shun) (consolidare, to make firm). The process of becoming firm or solid, as a lung in pneumonia.
  • Constant (kon'-stant) (constans, steady). Fixed. C. Current, one that goes continu- ously in one direction.
  • Constitution (kon-stit-u' '-shun) (constituere, to dispose). In chemistry, the atomic or molec- ular composition of a body. In pharmacy, the composition of a substance. In physiol- ogy, the general temperament and functional condition of the body.
  • Constitutional (kon-stit-u' -shun-al) . Pertain- ing to the state of the constitution. C. Diseases, such diseases as are inherent, owing to an abnormal structure of the body. Also, a condition in which the disease per- vades the whole system. General diseases, in contradistinction to local.
  • Contagion (kon-ta'-jun) (contingere, to touch), i. The process by which a specific disease is communicated from one person to another, either by direct contact or by means of an intermediate agent. 2. The specific germ or virus from which a communicable disease develops.
  • Contagious (kon-ta'-jus) (contagion). Commun- icable or transmissible by contagion or by a specific contagium.
  • Contagium (kon-ta' -je-um) (L.). Any virus or morbific matter by means of which a com- municable disease is transmitted from the sick to the well.
  • Contiguity (kon-tig-u' -it-e) (contingere). Prox- imity. C, Amputation in the, one performed at a joint, without section of a bone.
  • Continuity (kon-tin-u' -it-e) (com, together; tenere, to hold). The state of being con- tinuous or uninterrupted. C, Amputation in the, amputation in which a bone is divided.
  • Contraaperture (kon-trah-ap' -er-chur) . A coun- teropening.
  • Contract (kon-trakf) (contrahere, to draw together). 1. To draw the parts together; to shrink. 2. To acquire by contagion.
  • Contractor (kon-trakt'-or). A tensor muscle.
  • Contracture (kon - trak' - chur) (contraction). Contraction; permanent shortening, as of a muscle; distortion or deformity due to the shortening of a muscle or of various muscles. C, Nurse's. See Nurse's Contracture. C, Thomsenean, that occurring in Thomsen's disease.
  • Contradolin (kon-trad'-ol-in). A compound of acetamid, salicylic acid, and phenol; analgesic. Dose 4-8 gr. (0.25-0.5 Gm.) hourly.
  • Contralateral (kon-trah-laf '-er-al) (contra; latus, side). Opposite; applied to a muscle acting in unison with another on the opposite side of the body.
  • Contre-coup (kon-tr-koo) (Ft.). Counter- stroke. The transmission of a shock from the point struck to a point on the opposite side of the body or the part.
  • Controller (kon-trdl' -er). An apparatus for regulating the electric current to the operation of small lamps, faradic coils, small motors, etc.
  • Contunding (kon-tund'-ing) (see Contusion). Producing a contusion; bruising.
  • Contusion (kon-lu 1 '-zhun) (contundere, to bruise). A bruise or injury inflicted without the integument being broken. C. -pneumo- nia, a form of pneumonia following trauma- tism.
  • Convalescence (kon-val-es'-ens) (convalescere, to become well). A term applied to the restor- ation to health after disease.
  • Convallamaretin (kon-val-am-ar-e'-tin), C 2e - H 36 8 . A crystalline substance obtained by heating convallamarin with dilute sulfuric acid.
  • Convallamarin (kon-val-am' -ar-in) (conval- laria; amarus, bitter), C^H^O^. A glucosid derived from Convallaria majalis. It is soluble in water and is used as a cardiac stimulant. Dose f gr. (0.05 Gm.). Syn., Convallama- rinum.
  • Convallaretin (kon-val-ar-e'-lin), C 14 H 26 3 . A substance obtained from convallarin by pro- longed boiling in dilute acids.
  • Convallarin (kon-vaV -ar-in) (convallaria), C^HggOn. A crystalline purgative glucosid derived from Convallaria majalis.
  • Convergent (kon-ver' '-jent) (see Convergence. Tending to a common center. C. Strab- ismus. Sec Strabismus, Convergent.
  • Converter (kon-vert'-er). See Alternator.
  • Convex (kon-veks') (convexus, vaulted). Hav- ing a surface approximating more or less a part of the surface of a sphere.
  • Convexity (kon-veks' -it-e) (see Convex). A surface rounding outward; the quality of being convex.
  • Convexoconcave (kon-veks-o-kon-kdv') . See Concavoconvex.
  • Convexoconvex (kon-veks-o-kon-veks'). Hav- ing two convex surfaces; biconvex. See Lens, Biconvex.
  • Convolvulin (kon-vol' -vu-lin) (convolvere, to roll together), CgjH^Ojg. A glucosid derived from the roots of jalap (Convolvulus purga). It is a gummy mass, with active purgative properties.
  • Convulsant (kon-vuV '-sant) (see Convulsion). A medicine that causes convulsions.
  • Coordination (ko-or-din-a' '-shun) (com, to- gether; or dinar e, to regulate). The har- monious activity and proper sequence of operation of those parts that cooperate in the performance of any function.
  • Coordinator (ko-or' -din-a-tor) (see Coordina- tion). The part of the nervous system regulating coordination. C, Oculonuchal, Spitzka's name for the part of the postero- longitudinal fasciculus below the floor of the fourth ventricle.
  • Copiopia (kop-i-o'-pe-ah). See Kopiopia.
  • Copperas (kop'-er-as) (cupri rosa, rose of cop- per ( ?)). A common name for ferrous sulfate.
  • Copraol (kop'-ra-ol) (copra, the dried kernel of the cocoanut). A solid fat, derived from the cocoanut, and used as a substitute for cacao-butter in making suppositories. It melts at 30.3 C.
  • Copremia (kop-re'-me-ah) (no-poc, dung; alfia, blood). A form of general blood-poi- soning arising from chronic constipation. The symptoms are anemia, sallow complexion, anorexia, frontal headache, vertigo, nausea, flatulence, thirst, fetid breath, lassitude, hypochondriasis, and irritability of temper.
  • Copro- (kop-ro-)(K.oT:poc, dung). A prefix mean- ing relating to the feces or to dung.
  • Coprolalia (kop-ro-la'-le-ah) (copro-; XaXca, speech). The use of filthy and offensive lan- guage when a manifestation of disease.
  • Coprolith (kop'-ro-lith) (copro-; X'cOoc, a stone). A hard mass of fecal matter in the bowels.
  • Coprophagy (kop-roj'-a-je) (copro-; (f>ayel\s, to eat). The eating of dung, a symptom seen in insane and hysteric patients.
  • Coproplanesis (kop-ro-plan-e'-sis) (copro-; TtXavyocc, wandering). Escape of feces through a fistula or other abnormal opening.
  • Coprostasis (kop-ros' '-fas-is) (copro-; a-aatc, a standing). The accumulation of fecal mat- ter in the bowel.
  • Coptis (kop'-tis) (kot.-scv, to cut). Goldthread. The root of C. trifolia, a simple bitter tonic resembling quassia. It contains coptin, an alkaloid closely allied to berberin. Dose 10—30 gr. (0.65-2.0 Gm.).
  • Coraco- (kor-ak-o-) (n6pa£, a crow). Pertain- ing to the coracoid process.
  • Coracobrachialis (kor-ak-o-bra-ke-al'-is). See under Muscle.
  • Coracohyoid (kor-ak-o-hi'-oid). i. Relating to the coracoid process and the hyoid bone. 2. The omohyoid muscle.
  • Coracoid (kor f -ak-oid) (coraco-; eldoc, like- ness). 1. Having the shape of a crow's beak. 2. The coracoid process. C. Liga- ment, a triangular ligament joining the cora- coid process to the acromion. C. Process, a beak-shaped process of the scapula.
  • Coracoscapular (ko-rak-o-skap'-u-lar). Relat- ing to the coracoid process of the scapula and to some other portion of the scapula.
  • Cordate (kor'-dat) (cor). Heart-shaped.
  • Cordial (kord'-yal) (cor). 1. Pertaining to the heart; exhilarant; stimulant. 2. An aro- matic, spirituous stimulant.
  • Cordiform (kor' -de -form) (cor; forma, form). Cordate; shaped like a heart.
  • Cordite (kor'-dit). A smokeless gun-powder consisting of gun-cotton dissolved in acetone and nitroglycerin.
  • Cordol (kor'-dol). See Salol Tribromid.
  • Cordyl (kor'-dil). See Acetyl Tribromsalol.
  • Core (kor) (cor). The central slough of a boil or carbuncle. 2. (/copy, the pupil.) The pupil of the eye.
  • Coreclisis (kor-ek-li'-sis). See Coroclisis.
  • Corectasis (kor-ek'-ta-sis) (i<6prj, the pupil; BKxaocc, a stretching out). Dilation of the pupil.
  • Corectome (kor-ek'-tom) (core; kH.xkp.vEcv, to cut out). An instrument used in iridectomy.
  • Corectopia (kor-ek-to' -pe-ah) (core; eKX07toc, misplaced). An anomalous position of the pupil; displacement of the pupil.
  • Coredialysis (ko-re-di-aV -is-is) (core; dcaXuocc, dialysis). The production of an artificial pupil at the ciliary border of the iris.
  • Corelysis (kor -eV -is-is) (core; Xuocc, a loosening). The detachment of iritic adhesions to the lens or to the cornea.
  • Coremorphosis (kor-e-mor-fo'-sis) (core; pbp- (fxoocg, formation). The operation for estab- lishing an artificial pupil.
  • Coreometer (kor-e-om'-et-er) (core; pkxpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring the pupil of the eye.
  • Coreometry (kor-e-om 1 '-et-re) (see Coreom- eter). The measurement of the pupil of the eye.
  • Coreplasty (kor' -e-plas-te) (core; nXapoetv, to form). Any operation for forming an artificial pupil.
  • Coriamyrtin (ko-re-am-er' -tin) (Coriaria myrti- folia, myrtle), C^H^O^. An exceedingly poisonous principle, a glucosid, obtained from the fruit of Coriaria myrti folia. A cardiac stimulant. Maximum dose ■£% gr. (0.001 Gm.).
  • Coriandrol (kor-e-an'-drol), C 10 H 18 O. The chief constituent of oil of coriander; a liquid iso- merid of borneol. CORIDIN 305 CORONALE Coridin ikor'-id-in), C 10 H 15 N. A liquid base obtained from the distillation of bones.
  • Corium (ko'-re-um) (L., "a hide; leather"). The deep layer of the skin. See Skin.
  • Corm (korm) (nop fide, the trunk of a tree). The bulbous underground part of certain plants, as the crocus.
  • Corneitis (kor-ne-i'-tis). See Keratitis.
  • Corneoblepharon (kor-ne-o-blej'-ar-on) (cor- nea; blepharon). Adhesion of the surface of the eyelid to the cornea.
  • Corneoiritis (kor-ne-o-ir-i'-tis). See Keratoiri- tis.
  • Corneosclera (kor-ne-o-skle'-rah) (cornea; sclera). The cornea and sclera taken together.
  • Corneous (kor' -ne-us) (corneus, horny). Horny or horn-like. C. Tissue, the substance of the nails.
  • Cornet (kor -net') (cornu). 1. A small ear- trumpet worn within the ear and sometimes concealed by the hair of the wearer. 2. A bony layer. C, Bertin's, C, Sphenoid, the anterior part of the body of the sphenoid bone.
  • Corniculate (kor-nik' '-u-lat) (cornu). Furnished with horns or horn-shaped appendages.
  • Corniculum (kor-nik' -u-lum) (cornicula, a little horn). A small cornu or horn-like process.
  • Cornification (kor-nif-ik-a' -shun) (cornu; facere, to make). The process of hardening or making horny.
  • Cornual (kor'-nu-al) (cornu). Relating to a cornu. C. Myelitis, myelitis affecting the anterior cornua of the spinal cord.
  • Cornus (kor'-nus) (L.). Dogwood. The bark of the root of C. florida, the properties of which are due to a crystalline principle, cornin. It is a simple stomachic bitter and slightly antiperiodic. Dose of the fluidex- tract 10 min.— 1 dr. (0.65—4.0 Cc).
  • Cornutin (kor -nu' -tin). An alkaloid, the active principle of ergot. Dose ^2 g r - (°- 00 5 Gm.). C. Citrate. Dose aVrV g 1 "- (0.003-0.006 Gm.) in spermatorrhea.
  • Coroclisis, Corocleisis (ko-ro-kW -sis) (nbpy, the pupil; nh'tocc, a closure). Pathologic closure or obliteration of the pupil.
  • Coronal (kor-o'-naV) (corona). Encircling like a crown; pertaining to the crown of the head. C. Suture, the suture joining the frontal with the two parietal bones.
  • Coronale (kor-o-naV -e) (L.). The frontal bone. CORONARY 306 CORPUSCLE Coronary (kor' -o-na-re) (corona). A term ap- plied to vessels, nerves, or attachments that encircle a part or an organ.
  • Coroner (kor'-o-ner) (corona). An officer who inquires by authority of the law into the causes of sudden or violent deaths. C.'s Inquest, the legal inquiry before a jury into the cause of a sudden or violent death.
  • Coronillin (kor-o-niV -in) (see Coronilla). An alkaloid, C 7 H 12 3 , from Coronilla scorpioides; it is a cardiac tonic and diuretic. Dose 1-2 gr. (0.06-0.13 Gm.).
  • Coronoid (kor'-o-noid) (corona; etdoc, likeness). Crown-shaped, as the coronoid process of the ulna or of the jaw.
  • Coroparelcysis (kor-o-par-eV -si-sis) (nop-q, the pupil; izapklnuotc, a drawing aside). Opera- tive displacement of the pupil to remedy partial opacity of the cornea by bringing it opposite a transparent part.
  • Coroscopy (kor-os'-ko-pe). See Retinoscopy.
  • Corpulence, Corpulency (kor'-pu-lens, -se) (corpulentus, corpulent). Obesity; fatness of the body.
  • Corpulin (kor'-pu-lin). A remedy for obesity said to consist of bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosis), tamarinds, and cascara sagrada.
  • Corpuscular (hor-pus'-ku-lar) (corpuscle). Re- lating to or of the nature of a corpuscle.
  • Corradiation (kor-ra-de-a'-shun). The act of radiating together, as focused rays.
  • Correctant, Corrective (kor-ek'-tant, kor-ek'- tiv) (corrigere, to correct). 1. Modifying favorably. 2. A substance used to modify or make more pleasant the action of a purga- tive or other remedy.
  • Corrigent (kor'-ij-ent). See Correctant.
  • Corroborant (kor-ob'-o-ranf) (corrobarans, strengthening). A tonic invigorating remedy.
  • Corrugator (kor f -u-ga-tor) (corrugere, to wrinkle). That which wrinkles. See under Muscle.
  • Cortical (kor'-tik-al) (cortex). Pertaining to the cortex or bark or to the cortex of the brain or of the kidney. C. Epilepsy, C. Paralysis K such as is due to a lesion of the cortical substance of the brain.
  • Corticate (kor' -te-kat) . Furnished with a bark or cortex.
  • Corticifugal (kor-te-sif -u-gal) (cortex; fugere, to flee). Conducting away from the cortex.
  • Corticipetal (kor-te-sip' -et-al) (cortex; petere, to seek). Conducting toward the cortex.
  • Corticoafferent (kor-te-ko-af f -er-ent). See Cor- ticipetal.
  • Corticoefferent (kor-te-ko-ef'-er-ent). See Cor- ticifugal.
  • Corticospinal (kor-tik-o-spi'-nal). Pertaining to the cortex of the brain and the spinal cord.
  • Corydalin (kor-id'-al-in) (corydalis). 1. An ex- tract from the root of Corydalis formosa (Dicentra canadensis); it is used in syphilis and scrofula. 2. An alkaloid, C 22 H 27 N0 4 (Freund) from Corydalis tuberosa; it is used as % a heart -tonic. Dose 1-5 gr. (0.065- 0.032 Gm.).
  • Corydin (kor' '-id-in) . An amorphous alkaloid from Corydalis tuberosa.
  • Coryl (kor' -it). The name given to an anes- thetic composed of ethyl chlorid and methyl chlorid in such proportions that the boiling- point of the mixture should be about 32 F.
  • Coryleur (kor-il-ur'). An apparatus for spray- ing with coryl.
  • Coryza (kor-i'-zah) (nopu^a, a catarrh). Ca- tarrh of the mucous membrane of the nasal passages and adjacent sinuses, popularly called "cold in the head." See Rhinitis.
  • Cosaprin (kos-ap'-rin), C 6 H ' NI |— €0— CH A sulfoderivative of acetanilid; it is a whitish- gray powder with a slightly saline taste, freely soluble in water. It is used as an antipyretic instead of acetanilid. Dose 5-8 gr. (0.3- 0.5 Gm.) 3 times daily.
  • Cosmetic (kos-mef -ik) (koojisIv, to adorn). 1. Beautifying. 2. A remedy designed to hide defects of the skin or other external parts. C. Operation, a surgical operation to give a natural appearance to a defective or unsightly part.
  • Cosmic (kos'-mik) (koojioc, the universe). Worldwide; of wide distribution, as a cosmic disease.
  • Cosmolin (koz r -mo-lin). See Petrolatum.
  • Costa (kos'-tah) (L.). A rib.
  • Costal (kos'-tal) (costa). Pertaining to the ribs. C. Arch, the arch of the ribs. C. Cartilages, the twelve cartilaginous extensions of the ribs.
  • Costate (kos'-tat). Ribbed; furnished with ribs or connecting structures.
  • Costiform (kos'-te-form). Rib-shaped.
  • Costive (kos'-tiv) (constipare, to be bound). Constipated.
  • Costiveness (kos' -tiv-nes) (constipare). Con- stipation.
  • Costo- (kos-to-) (costa). A prefix denoting connection with the ribs.
  • Costoabdominal (kos-to-ab-dom'-in-al). Re- lating to the ribs and the abdomen. COSTOCHONDRAL 309 COULOMB Costochondral (kos-lo-kon'-dral). Pertaining to the ribs and their cartilages.
  • Costoclavicular (kos-to-klav-ik'-u-lar). Per- taining to the ribs and the clavicle.
  • Costocolic (kos-to-ko'-lik). Relating to the ribs and the colon.
  • Costoinferior (kos-to-in-fe'-re-or). Relating to the lower ribs; applied to a form of respira- tion in which the lower ribs move more than the upper.
  • Costoscapular (kos-to-skap'-u-lar). i. Re- lating to the ribs and the scapula. 2. The serratus magnus muscle.
  • Costosuperior (kos-to-su-pe'-re-or). Relating to the upper ribs.
  • Costotome (kos' '-to-torn) (costo-; ripjetv, to cut). A strong knife or heavy shears with the under blade in the shape of a hook, for cutting the costal cartilages in dissection, etc.
  • Costotrachelian (kos-to-tra-ke'-le-an). Relat- ing to the ribs and to the transverse processes of the cervical vertebras.
  • Costotransverse (kos-to-tranz'-vers). 1. Per- taining to the ribs and transverse vertebral processes. 2. The scalenus lateralis. See under Muscle.
  • Costotransversectomy (kos-lo-lranz-vers-ek f - to-me) (costotransverse; iKzop.Tj, a cutting out). Excision of part of a rib and a transverse vertebral process.
  • Costoxiphoid (kos-to-zi'-Joid). Relating to the ribs and to the ensiform cartilage.
  • Cot (kot) (AS., cote). 1. A small bed. 2. The finger of a glove. See Finger -cot. C, Fever-, C.,Kibbee's, a bed devised especially for applying cold-water treatment to fever patients.
  • Cotarnin (ko-tar f -nin) (an anagram of narcotin), C 12 H 15 N0 4 . An oxidation-product of nar- cotin. C. Hydrochlorate, C 12 H 15 N0 4 . HC1 . - • H 2 0, small yellow crystals, soluble in water and alcohol. It is an internal hemostatic. Dose \-2 gr. (0.03-0.13 Gm.). Syn., Stypticin.
  • Cotoin (ko'-to-in) (coto), C 22 H 18 6 . An astrin- gent alkaloid from coto (q. v.). It is employed in dysentery and cholera. Dose §-5 gr. (0.03- 0.3 Gm.). Paracotoin is one-half as strong as cotoin.
  • Cotyloid (kot' -il-oid) (koxuXtj, a cup; eldoc, form). Cup-shaped. C. Cavity, C. Fossa, the acetabulum. C. Ligament, a ligament surrounding the acetabulum. C. Notch, a notch in the anterior and lower border of the acetabulum.
  • Cotylopubic (kot-il-o-pu' -bik) . Relating to the acetabulum and the os pubis.
  • Cotyltfsacral (kot-il-o-sa' '-kral) . Relating to the acetabulum and the sacrum.
  • Couch-grass (kowlch' '-gras) . See Triticum.
  • Couching (kowtch' -ing) (Fr., coucher, to de- press). The operation, now fallen into dis- use, of depressing a cataractous lens into the vitreous chamber, where it was left to be absorbed.
  • Coumarin (koo'-mar-in), C 9 H 6 2 . A vege- table proximate principle that occurs in Dipteryx odorata, Tonka bean, and in Meli- lotus officinalis. It conceals the odor of iodoform.
  • Counteraction (kown-ter-ak'-shun). The ac- tion of a drug or agent opposed to that of some other drug or agent.
  • Counterextension (kown-ter-eks -ten' -shun) . See under Extension.
  • Counterindication ( kown - ter - in-dik-a' -shun) . See Contraindication.
  • Counterirritation (kown-ter-ir-it-a' -shun) (contra, against; irritare, to irritate). Su- perficial inflammation produced artificially, in order to exercise a good effect upon some adjacent or deep-seated morbid process.
  • Counteropening (kown' -ter -o -pen-in g) (contra; opening). An incision made in an abscess or cavity, opposite to another, generally for pur- poses of drainage.
  • Counterpoison (kown' -ter -poi-zn) (contra; potio, a drink). A poison given as an anti- dote to another poison.
  • Counterpressure (kown'.-ter-presh-ur). Pres- sure opposed to pressure from a contrary di- rection. * Counterpuncture (kown' -ter -punk-chur). See Counteropening.
  • Counterstroke (kown' -ter -str ok). See Contre- coup.
  • Coupler (kup'-ler) (copulare, to bind), i. An arrangement for fastening wire to a tooth in correcting irregularities in dentition. 2. A device for connecting different parts of an electric apparatus.
  • Courbometer (koor-bom' -et-er) (Fr., courbe, a curve; ixtcpov, a measure). A device of Chatelain to show the curve of the alternat- ing current.
  • Court-plaster (kort'-plas-ter). See under Plaster.
  • Coutoubea (koo-toc' -be-ah) (South American name). A genus of plants of the order Gen- tianece. C spicata, of Brazil, is emmenagog and anthelmintic.
  • Cover (kuv'-er) (com, together; operire, to shut). C. -glass, in microscopy, the thin slip of glass covering the object mounted on the slide.
  • Cowage, Cowhage, Cowitch (kow'-aj, -itch) (Hind., kawanch, cowage). The external hairs of the pod of Mucuna pruriens, formerly used in medicine as a mechanic vermifuge. See also Mucuna.
  • Cowperitis (kow-per-i'-tis). Inflammation of the glands of Cowper, usually gonorrheal in origin.
  • Cowpox, Cowpock (kow'-poks). A contagious eruptive fever occurring in the cow, and thought to correspond with smallpox in man.
  • Coxalgia (koks-al' -je-ah) (coxa; aXyoc, pain). Literally, pain in the hip-joint, but generally used synonymously with hip-disease.
  • Coxalgic (koks-aV -jik) (coxalgia). Relating to coxalgia.
  • Coxankylometer (koks-ang-kil-om' -et-er) (coxa; ajKuXoc, bent; fiexpov, a measure). Volk- mann's instrument for measuring the de- formity in hip-disease.
  • Coxarthritis (koks-ar-thri'-tis). The same as Coxitis.
  • Coxarthrocace (koks-arth-rok'-as-e) (coxa; apdpov, joint; nandc, bad). A fungoid in- flammation of the hip-joint.
  • Coxitis (koks-i'-tis) (coxa; tree, inflammation). Inflammation of the hip-joint. C. coty- loidea, that confined principally to the acetab- ulum. C, Senile, a rheumatoid disease of the hip-joint occurring in old people, marked by pain, stiffness, and wasting, without any tendency to suppuration.
  • Coxofemoral (koks-o-fem' -or-al) (coxa; femur, the thigh-bone). Relating to the hip and the femur, as the coxofemoral joint — the hip-joint.
  • Coxopathy (koks-op' -ath-e) (coxa; tzoBoc, dis- ease). Any affection of the hip-joint.
  • Crab-louse (krab'-lows). See Pediculus pubis.
  • Crabs'-eyes (krabz'-iz). 1. Flat, calcareous concretions (Lapides cancrorum) derived from the stomach of the crab; they have been used as a means of removing foreign bodies from the eye. 2. A name for the seeds of Abrus precatorius.
  • Cranial (kra' -ne-at) (cranium). Relating to the cranium. C. Capacity, Modes of Measur- ing. See under Skull.
  • Craniectomy (kra-ne-ek' -to-me) (cranium; en- ropLT), a cutting out). The surgical removal of strips or pieces of the cranial bones. It is performed in cases of microcephalia.
  • Craniencephalometer (kra-ne-en-sef-al-om' '- et-er) (cranium; i-fukcfraXoc, the brain; fxirpov, a measure). An instrument for determining the position of the gyri of the brain from the outer surface of the head.
  • Cranio cervical (kra-ne-o-ser' -vik-al) . Relat- ing to the cranium and the neck.
  • Cranio- (kra-ne-o-) (cranium). A prefix mean- ing relating to the cranium.
  • Cranioabdominal (kra-ne-o-ab-dom' -in-at) . Re- lating to the cranium and the abdomen; ap- plied to temperaments showing a predomin- ance of cerebral and abdominal influences.
  • Craniocerebral (kra-ne-o-ser'-e-bral). Relat- ing to the cranium and the cerebrum.
  • Cranioclasm (kra' -ne-o-klasm) (cranio-; nXaecv, to break). The operation of breaking the fetal head by means of the cranioclast.
  • Cranioclast (kra' ' -ne-o-klast) (see Cranioclasm). A heavy forceps for crushing the fetal head.
  • Craniognomy (kra-ne-og' -no-me) . See Cepha- lology.
  • Craniology (kra-ne-oV-o-je) (cranio-; Xoyoc;, science). A branch of anatomy comprising the study of skulls.
  • Craniometry (kra-ne-om r -et-re) (see Craniometer). The ascertainment of the proportions and measurements of skulls.
  • Craniorrachischisis (kra-ne-or-rak-is'-kis-is) (cranio-; pa%ic, spine; ox'tocc, a cleaving). Congenital fissure of the skull and spine.
  • Cranioschisis (hra-ne^os' -his -is) (cranio-; ox'cocc, a cleaving). Congenital fissure of the skull.
  • Craniotabes (kra-ne-o-ta' -bez) (cranio-; tabes, a wasting). An atrophy of the cranial bones occurring in infancy, with the formation of small, shallow, conic pits in the bone- substance. Craniotabes results from rachitis, syphilis, or marasmus.
  • Craniothoracic (kra-ne-o-thor-as'-ik). Relat- ing to the skull and the thorax; applied to temperaments showing a predominance of cerebral and thoracic influences.
  • Craniotomy (kra-ne-ot'-o-me) (cranio-; rofirj, a cutting). The operation of reducing the size of the fetal head by cutting or breaking it up, when delivery is otherwise impossible. C, Linear. See Craniectomy.
  • Craniotrypesis (kra-ne-o-trip-e' 'sis) (cranio- ; rpuTt-qocc, a boring). Trephining.
  • Craniotympanic (kra-ne-o-tim-pan f -ik) (cran- io-; tympanum. Pertaining to the skull and the tympanum.
  • Craniovertebral (kra-ne-o-ver' '-te-bral). Same as Cerebrospinal.
  • Cranitis (kra"-ni' -lis) . Inflammation of a cranial bone.
  • Cranium (kra'-ne-um) (npavhv, the skull). The skull. The cavity that contains the brain, its membranes, and vessels.
  • Crapulent, Crapulous krap' -u-lent, -lus) (crapula, drunkenness; surfeit). Marked by excess in eating and drinking.
  • Crassamentum (kras-am-en' '-turn) (L., "thick- ness"). A clot, as of blood.
  • Crealbin (kre-al'-bin). An internal antiseptic said to consist of creolin and albumin. Syn., Creolalbin.
  • Cream (krem) (cremor, ■ thick juice or broth). The rich fat part of milk. C. of Tartar. See Potassium Bitartrate.
  • Crease (kres) (Celtic). A line made by folding. C, Gluteofemoral, C, Iliofemoral, the crease that bounds the buttock below, cor- responding nearly to the lower edge of the gluteus maximus muscle. It is of supposed significance in the diagnosis of hip-disease.
  • Creaspl (kre'-as-ol) (icpiac, flesh; oleum, oil), C 8 H 10 O 2 . One of the principal phenols con- tained in creasote. It is formed from guaia- cum-resin, and is found in beechwood tar. It is a colorless, oily liquid of an agreeable odor and a burning taste, boiling at 220 C. It is very similar to guaiacol.
  • Creatin (kre'-at-in) (npiac, flesh), C 4 H 9 N 3 2 . A neutral organic substance that occurs in the animal organism, especially in the juice of muscles. C, Dehydrated, cre- atinin.
  • Creatinemia (kre-at-in-e' -me-ah) (creatin; a/xa, blood). An excess of creatin in the blood.
  • Creatinin (kre-af '-in-in) (creatin), C 4 H 7 N 3 0. An alkaline substance, a normal constituent of urine. It crystallizes in rhombic prisms and is a strong base. It is much more soluble than creatin. C, Reaction for. See Jaffe, Kemer, v. Maschke, Weyl.
  • Creek Dots. Small shining dots, of unknown nature and often hereditary, occurring at times in the retina anterior to the retinal vessels; they were so named by Marcus Gunn, who first described them.
  • Cremaster (kre-mas' -ter) (Kpep.av, to support). The muscle that draws up the testis. See under Muscle.
  • Cremasteric (kre-mas-ter' -ik) (cremaster). Per- taining to the cremaster muscle. C. Reflex. See under Re-flex.
  • Cremation (kre-ma' '-shun) (cremare, to burn). The destruction of the dead body by burning, as distinguished from interment.
  • Cremnophobia (krem-no-fo' -be-ah) (kptj/ivoc, a crag; 6ftoc, fear). Morbid fear of preci- pices.
  • Cremometer (krem-oni'-et-er) (cream; (ikrpov, a measure). A graduated tube for deter- mining the percentage of cream in milk.
  • Cremor (kre'-mor) (L., "broth"). Cream. Any thick substance formed on the surface of a liquid. C. tartari, cream of tartar.
  • Crenation (kre-na' -shun) (crena, a notch). A notched or mulberry -like appearance of the red corpuscles of the blood. It is seen when they are exposed to the air or strong saline solutions.
  • Crenothrix (kren' '-oth-riks) (kptjvt), a spring; dpi$, hair). A genus of Schizomycetes the filaments of which are enveloped in a gelatin- ous sheath.
  • Creoform (kre f -o-orm). A solid, tasteless antiseptic consisting of guaiacol, creasote, and formaldehyd.
  • Creolalbin (kre-ol-aV -bin) . See Crealbin.
  • Creolin (kre'-o-lin) (fcpeac, flesh; oleum, oil). A coal-tar product deprived of phenol; it is an antiseptic, used especially as a douche in obstetric practice. It has also been used in a solution of 5 : 1000 for irrigation of the bowel in dysentery and enterocolitis.
  • Creosal (kre'-o-sal). A dark -brown, hygro- scopic powder, with odor and taste of creasote, obtained by heating beechwood creasote with tannic acid and phosphorous oxychlorid. It is antiseptic and astringent, and is used in bronchial inflammations. Dose 15-135 gr. (1-9 Gm.) daily. Syn., Tannosal.
  • Creosin (kre f -o-sin) . A compound of creasote, iodin, calcium hypophosphite, and balsam of peru; it is used like creasote.
  • Creosoform (kre-o' -so-) orm). A combination of creasote and formaldehyd, occurring as a greenish powder.
  • Creosolid (kre-o-sol'-id). See Creasote-mag- nesia.
  • Creosomagnesol (kre-o-so-mag' -ne-sol) . A dry mixture of potassium hydroxid, creasote, and magnesia; antiseptic. Dose 2 gr. (0.13 Gm.) in pill with honey.
  • Creosotal (kre-o 1 '-so-tal) . See Creasote Carbonate.
  • Creosote, Creosotum (kre'-o-sot, kre-o -so' -turn). See (Creasote.
  • Crepitant (kref '-it-ant) (crepitare, to crackle). Possessing the character of crepitation. C. Rale. See under Rale.
  • Crepitus. See Crepitation.
  • Cresalol (kres'-al-ol) (cresol; salol). Cresol salicylate, an intestinal antiseptic Cresamin (kres'-am-in). An antiseptic and ger- micide mixture of ethylenediamin and tricresol.
  • Cresin (kre'-sin). A mixture of cresol, 25%, and sodium cresoxylacetate ; a brown, clear • fluid, said to be less poisonous than phenol. It is used in 0.5 to 1 % solution as a wound antiseptic. Syn., Cresaprol.
  • Cresyl (kres f -il), CyHy. The radicle of cresol. C. Alcohol, C 6 H 4 (OH)CH 3 , formed from phenyl alcohol by the substitution of a molecule of methyl for an atom of the hydrogen of the phenyl. C. Hydrate. See C. Alcohol.
  • Cresylate (kres'-il-at). Any compound of cresol with a metallic radicle.
  • Cretaceous (kre-ta' -she-us) (creta). 1. Chalky. 2. Chalky -white in color.
  • Cretin (kre'-tin) (Fr., cretin, a simple-minded person). A person affected with cretinism.
  • Cribration (krib-ra' -shun) (cribrum). 1. The state of being cribriform or perforate. 2. The act of sifting.
  • Cribriform (krib' '-re-form) (cribrum). Perfor- ated like a sieve, as the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone.
  • Crichton Browne's sign. See Browne's Sign.
  • Crico- (kri-ko-) (KpUoc, a ring). A prefix denoting connection with the cricoid carti- lage.
  • Cricoarytenoid (kri-ko-ar-i 1 '-te-noid) (crico-; arytenoid). Pertaining to the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages.
  • Cricohyoid, Cricohyoideus (kri-ko-hi' -old, kri-ko-hi-oid'-e-us). Relating to the cricoid cartilage and the hyoid bone.
  • Cricoid (kri' -koid) (crico-; tlbog, form). Ring- shaped. C. Cartilage, the ring-shaped cartil- age of the larynx.
  • Cricoidectomy (kri-koid-ek' -to-me) (cricoid; kn~kp.ve.Lv, to cut out). The excision of the cricoid cartilage.
  • Cricothyrotomy (kri-ko-thi-rot' -o-me). Cricot- omy with division of the . cricothyroid mem- brane.
  • Cricotomy (kri-kot' -o-me) (crico-; zkpvecv, to cut). Surgical laryngotomy by cutting through the cricoid cartilage.
  • Cricotracheal, Cricotrachealis (kri-ko-lra' '- ke-al, -tra-ke-aV -is) . Relating to the cricoid cartilage and to the trachea.
  • Cricotracheotomy (kri - ko - trak - e - ot'-o - me) (crico-; tracheotomy). Tracheotomy through the cricoid cartilage.
  • Crinate, Crinated (krin'-dt, krin-a f -ted) (crinis, a hair). Bearded with long hairs or hair -like processes; crinite.
  • Criniform (krin'-e-form) (crinis, a, hair; forma, form). Filiform ; resembling horsehairs.
  • Crinosity (krin-os' '-it-e) . Hairiness'.
  • Crismer's Test for Glucose. An alkaline solution of glucose when heated to boiling with a solution of 1 part safranin in 1000 parts- water decolorizes the safranin solution or renders it pale yellow. It is not decolorized when heated with uric acid, creatinin, or creatin in an alkaline solution.
  • Crispation (kris-pa'-shun) (crispare, to curl). 1. See Crispatura. 2. A slight involuntary quivering of the muscles.
  • Crispatura (kris-pah-tn' -rah) (L.). A pucker- ing; a contracture. C. tendinum, Dupuy- tren's contraction.
  • Cristallin (kris f -tal-in) . A kind of collodion, in which the ether and alcohol employed as solvents for pyroxylin are replaced by methyl- alcohol. It does not dry so readily as ordinary collodion. Syn., Crystallin.
  • Cristate (Jiris' -tat) . Crested. CRITH 316 CRUROINGUINAL Crith (krith) (apcdrj, barley-corn). The as- sumed unit of mass for gases. It is the weight of one liter of hydrogen, which is 0.0896 of a gram, or 1.37 grains.
  • Critical (krit' -ik-al) (uplocc, a decisive point). Pertaining to a crisis.
  • Crocated (kro' -ka-ted) (see Crocus). Contain- ing saffron.
  • Crocidism, Crocidismus, Crocidixis (kro f - sid-izm, kro-sid-iz'-mus, -iks'-is). See Car- phology.
  • Croconic (kro-kon'-ik). Saffron-colored.
  • Crocus (kro'-kus) (uponoc, crocus; saffron). Saffron. The stigmas of the flowers of C. sativus. It is an aromatic stimulant, em- menagog, and antispasmodic. Dose of the tincture (10% in strength) 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc); of the drug 5-20 gr. (0.32-1.3 Gm.) in infusion.
  • Crossed (krosd) (crux, a cross). Having the shape of a cross. Affecting alternate sides of the body. C. Anesthesia. See Anesthesia, Crossed. C. Hemiplegia, C. Paralysis. See Paralysis, Crossed. C. Reflexes, reflex movements on one side of the body, ex- cited by stimulation of a part on the oppo- site side.
  • Crotin (kro' -tin). A mixture of toxic albumin- oids contained in croton seeds. It is a yel- lowish powder containing about 21% of ashes, soluble in water and in a 10% solu- tion of sodium chlorid; it is a protoplasmic poison.
  • Crotonism (kro'-ton-izm). Poisoning by croton oil; a condition marked by hemorrhagic gas- troenteritis.
  • Crounotherapy (kru-no-ther r -ap-e) (apouvog, a spring; therapy). Riesman's term for the employment of mineral waters for drinking- cures.
  • Croupine (kroop'-en). Laryngismus stridulus.
  • Crowd-poison (krowd' '-poison). Volatile or- ganic matter recognizable in the air of ill- ventilated places where many persons are con- gregated.
  • Crown (krown). See Corona. C. of a Tooth, the exposed part of the tooth above the gums.
  • Crucial (kru'-shal) (crux, sl cross). Re- sembling or pertaining to a cross, as a crucial incision .
  • Cruciform (kru'-se-form) (crux; jorma, form). Crucial; shaped like a cross.
  • Crudivorous (kru-div'-or-us) (crudus, raw; vorare, to devour). Applied to savages sub- sisting entirely upon uncooked food.
  • Cruentous (kru-en' -tus) (cruor). Bloody.
  • Cruenturesis (kru-en-tu-re' -sis) (cruentus, bloody; oopov, urine). Hematuria.
  • Cruor (kru'-or) (L., "blood"). Blood, espe- cially coagulated blood.
  • Crura (kru'-rah) (pi. of crus). See Crus. C. anthelicis, C. bifurcata, two ridges on the inner aspect of the external ear, converging at the anthelix. Syn., Radices anthelicis. C. of the Fornix. See Pillars, Anterior and Posterior, of the Fornix. C. of the Penis, the corpora cavernosa.
  • Cruritis (kru-ri f -tis) See Phlegmasia alba dolens.
  • Crurogenital (kru-ro-jen' '-it-al) (crura; genitalis, relating to generation). Relating to the thighs and the genitalia.
  • Crurseus (kru'-re-us) (L.). See Vastus inter nus under Muscle.
  • Crust (krust) (crusta). A covering, especially a dried exudate on the skin.
  • Crusta (krus' -tali) (L., " a crust"), i. See Crust. 2. The inferior portion of the crus cerebri. C. lamellosa, psoriasis. C. osteoides (radicis), C. petrosa, a thin layer of bone covering the fang of a tooth. C. phlogistica, the yellowish layer of the upper stratum of a blood-clot, coagulating slowly.
  • Cryalgesia (kri-al -je'-ze-ah) (xpuoe, cold; aXyqocc, pain). Pain from the application of cold.
  • Cryogenin (kri-oj' -en-in) . Metabenzamino- semicarbazid. It is given in treatment of tuberculosis for diminishing the fever, be- ing innocuous and effective.
  • Cryoscopy (kri-os'-ko-pe) (npuoc, cold; oKoxelv, to examine). The process whereby the freez- ing-point of certain liquids, blood, urine, etc., may be compared with that of distilled water.
  • Cryostase (kri'-os-taz). A compound of equal parts of phenol, camphor, saponin, and traces of oil of turpentine. It solidifies when heated, and becomes liquid when cooled to below o° C. Recommended as an antiseptic.
  • Crypto- (krip-to-) (crypt). A prefix meaning relating to a crypt, or a small sac or follicle.
  • Cryptobiotic (krip-to-bi-ot'-ik) (crypto-; ft'cog, life). Having dormant life; applied formerly to calculi, crystals, or any inanimate objects which increase in size. Syn., Lithobiotic.
  • Cryptocephalus (krip-to-sef'-al-us) (crypto-; K$(paXrj, head). A fetal monster with an im- perfectly formed and concealed head.
  • Cryptococcus (krip-to-kok'-us). See under Bacteria.
  • Cryptogam (krip'-to-gam) (crypto-; ya/wc, marriage). In biology, one of the Cryp- togamia, a division of the vegetable king- dom comprising all plants with concealed sexual organs, without pistils or stamens.
  • Cryptogenic (krip-to-jen' -ik) (crypto-; yevvav, to produce). 1. Obscure as to origin. 2. Parasitic from the outset within another living organism.
  • Cryptolithiasis" (krip-to-lith-i'-a-sis) (crypto-; lithiasis). The calcification and ossification of tumors of the skin and subcutaneous tissue.
  • Cryptomerorrachischisis (krip-to-mer-o-rak- is'-kis-is) (crypto-; pkpoc, a part; payjc, the spine; oyc^ecv, to cleave). Spina bifida occulta, a variety with bony deficiency but without a tumor.
  • Cryptophthalmos (krip-tof-thal'-mos) (crypto-; dcpOaXpoc, the eye). 1. Congenital union of the eyelids, usually over imperfect eyes. 2.
  • Cryptopin (krip'-to-pin) (crypto-; bncov, opium), C 21 H 23 N0 5 . One of the alkaloids of opium, colorless and odorless. It is said to be anodyne and hypnotic, but it is less safe than morphin. Dose gr. (0.008 Gm.).
  • Cryptoporous (krip-top f -or-us) (crypto-; rcbpoc, a pore). Having hidden or obscure pores.
  • Cryptorchid, Cryptorchis (krip-tor'-kid, -kis) (crypto-; bpycg, testicle). A person with retained testicles, *. e., not descended into the scrotum.
  • Cryptorchidism (krip-tor'-kid-izm) (see Cryptorchid). Retention of the testes in the abdomen or inguinal canal.
  • Crystallin (kris' -tal-in) (crystal). i. The globulin of the crystalline lens. 2. See Cris- tallin.
  • Crystalline (kris' '-tal-en or -In) (crystal). Like a crystal. C. Lens. See Lens, Crystal- line.
  • Crystallose (kris f -tal-oz) . Sodium saccharinate. Crystalluridrosis (kris - tal - u - rid - ro'- sis) (crystal; oOpov, urine; cdpcbc;, sweat). A condition marked by excretion of urinary elements in the sweat which crystallize on the skin.
  • Cubebic Acid (ku-beb' -ik) . See Acid, Cubebic.
  • Cubebin (ku-beb' -in) (cubeb), C 10 H 10 O 3 . An odorless, crystalline substance obtained from cubeb.
  • Cubebism (kuf-beb-izm). Poisoning by cubeb; it is marked by acute gastroenteritis.
  • Cubit (ku'-bit) (cubitus). 1. The forearm; cubitus. 2. The ulna. 3. The elbow.
  • Cubitodigital (ku-bit-o-dij 1 '-it-al) . Relating to the forearm or the ulna and to the fingers.
  • Cubitometacarpal (ku-bit-o-met-ah-kar' -pal). Relating to the forearm or the ulna and the metacarpus.
  • Cubitosupraphalangeal (ku-bit-o-su-prah-fal- an'-je-al). Relating to the forearm or the ulna and the bases of the phalanges.
  • Cubitus (ku'-bi-tus) (L., "the elbow"). The forearm. C. valgus, a deformity consisting of an abnormal curvature of the humeral diaphysis. C. varus. See Gunstock De- formity.
  • Cubocuneiform (ku-bo-ku-ne'-if-orm). Re- lating to the cuboid bone and to one or more of the cuneiform bones.
  • Cuboid (ku'-bmd) (ku(3oc~, cube; eldog, like). Resembling a cube. C. Bone, a bone of the foot situated at the outer anterior part of the tarsus.
  • Cuca (koo'-kah). See Erythroxylon.
  • Culdesac (kuV -de-sak) (Fr.). A closed or "blind" pouch or sac. C, Douglas', a pouch between the anterior wall of the rectum and the posterior wall of the uterus, formed by the reflection of the peritoneum.
  • Culex (ku'-leks) (L., "a gnat"). A mosquito. C. fasciatus. See Stegomyia fasciata.
  • Culicide (ku'-lis-id) (culex; ccedere, to kill). Any agent which destroys mosquitos.
  • Culicifuge (ku-lis'-if-uj) (culex; fugare, to drive away). An agent to drive away mosquitos.
  • Culmen (kul'-men) (L., "summit"). A part of the cerebellum on the cephalic side of the vermis.
  • Cumarin (ku 1 '-mar-in). See Coumarin.
  • Cumene (ku'-men) (cumin), C 9 H 12 . A com- pound made by distilling cumic acid with lime.
  • Cumin (ku'-mht) (cuminum, cumin). An um- belliferous plant, Cuminum cyminum, native in Egypt and Syria. The fruit possesses well-marked stimulating and carminative properties. Its active principle is an oil.
  • Cuminic (ku-min' -ik) . See Cumic.
  • Cumulative (ku' ' -mu-la-tiv) (cumulare, to heap up). Increasing; adding to. C. Action, C. Effect, the production of a marked and sudden result, after the administration of a considerable number of comparatively in- effective doses.
  • Cundurango (kun-du-ran' -go) . See Condu- rango. Cuneal, Cuneate (ku f -ne-al, ku'-ne-at) (cuneus).
  • Cuneocuboid (ku-ne-o-ku' '-boid) . See Cubocu- neiform.
  • Cuneoscaphoid (ku-ne-o-skaf'-oid). Relating to the cuneiform bones and to the scaphoid bone.
  • Cuniculus (ku-nik' -u-lus) (L., "a subterranean passage"). The burrow of the itch-mite. In the plural, cuniculi, the semicircular canals of the ear.
  • Cunisset's Test for Bile-pigments. Addition to the urine of half its volume of chloroform imparts a yellow color to the latter.
  • Cuphosis (ku-fo f -sis). See Kyphosis.
  • Cupola (ku'-po-lah) (L., "a dome"). The dome-shaped extremity of the canal of the cochlea; also the summit of a solitary gland of the small intestine.
  • Cupram (ku'-pram) (cuprum). A solution of copper carbonate in ammonia-water used as a fungicide.
  • Cuprammonic (ku-pram-on'-ik). Containing copper and ammonia.
  • Cuprargol (ku-prar'-gol). A cupro nucleic acid compound, occurring as a gray powder, slowly soluble in water. It is used in the treatment of conjunctivitis by instillation of a 1 to 5 % solution once or several times daily; in trachoma used as an astringent in 20% aqueous solution.
  • Cuprate (ku'-prat). A double salt containing a cupric compound.
  • Cupratin (ku f -pra-tin) . A preparation of copper albuminoid, similar to ferratin.
  • Cuprea Bark (ku' -pre-ah) . The bark of cer- tain species of Remijia. It affords quinin and the associated alkaloids.
  • Cuprein (ku r -pre-in) , C 19 H 22 N 2 2 . An alkaloid derived from cuprea bark.
  • Cuprene (ku'-pren), C 7 H 8 . A nonvolatile in- soluble hydrocarbon; a yellow, bulky solid consisting of matted filaments resembling amadou in appearance, obtained by passing a current of pure acetylene gas over bright copper filings.
  • Cuprescent (ku-pres'-ent). Having the appear- ance of copper.
  • Cupressin (ku-pres' -in) . Cypress oil.
  • Cupriaseptol (ku-pre-ah-sep' -tol) . Copper sul- focarbolate. * Cupric (ku'-prik). Containing copper as a bivalent element. C. Oxid. See Copper Oxid, Black.
  • Cuprocitrol (ku-pro-sif-rol). A copper and citrol derivative used in trachoma in 5 to 10 % salve.
  • Cuprohemol (ku-pro-he'-mol). A compound of copper and hemol used in tuberculosis. Dose 1 \-2 gr. (0.1-0.13 Gm.).
  • Cuprol (ku'-prol). See Copper Nucleinate.
  • Cuprosopotassic (ku-pro-so-po-tas'-ik). Re- lating to a combination of cuprous salt and potassium.
  • Cuprosulfate (ku-pro-sul'-fdt). A double sul- fate containing copper.
  • Cuprotartrate (ku-pro-tar'-trat). A combina- tion of copper and tartaric acid. Cuprous (ku'-prus). Containing copper as a univalent element. C. Oxid. See Copper Oxid, Red.
  • Cuprum (ku'-prum) (L.). Copper. See Copper.
  • Cupula (ku'-pu-lah) (L., "a little cup"). An invisible substance on the crista? acusticas that on the application of fixation fluids coagulates and becomes visible. C. termi- nalis. See Membrana tectoria.
  • Cupular, Cupulate (ku'-pu-lar, -lat). Cup- shaped.
  • Curage (ku-rahzh) (Ft.), i. Curettage; cleans- ing of the eye or of an ulcerated or carious surface. 2. A term used by some authorities for clearing the uterine cavity by means of the finger, as distinguished from the use of the curet.
  • Curarize (koo'-rah-riz). To bring a subject under the influence of curara.
  • Curasao, Curacoa (ku-ra-so') (island of Curagao, north of Venezuela). A cordial or elixir prepared from brandy, and flavored, principally with orange-peel. It is used as a vehicle for certain medicines.
  • Curcuma (ker f -ku-mah) (L.). Turmeric. The rhizome of Curcuma longa, of India, a plant of the Zingiber ace T), nourishment). Nutrition of the fetus.
  • Cy stotrachelotomy (sist-o-trak-el-ot f -o-me) . See Cystauchenotomy .
  • Cy taster (si-tas'-ter). The same as Aster.
  • Cyprian (sip' -re-an) (island of Cyprus, the original source of copper). Containing copper.
  • Cypridol (sip'-rid-ol). A 1 % solution of nas- cent mercuric iodid in aseptic oil; it is used in syphilis (dose 3 gr. — 0.2 Gm.) and as an application in skin diseases.
  • Cypridopathy (sip-rid-op' -ath-e) (Konpcg, Venus; Ttadoc, disease). An adenopathy of venereal origin.
  • Cyrtoid (sir'-toid) (nup-bg, curved; eldoc, likeness). Hump-like.
  • Cyrtometer (sir-torn' -et-er) (nuproc, curved; p.hpov, a measure). An instrument adapted for measuring curves. One form is used to locate the fissures of the brain.
  • Cyrtosis (sir-to'-sis) (Kuproc, curved). Spinal curvature.
  • Cystadenoma (sist-ad-en-o'-mah) (cyst; ade- noma), i. An adenoma containing cysts. 2. Adenoma of the bladder. C. papilli- ferum, an adenoma containing cysts with papillas on the inner aspect of the cyst-walls.
  • Cystadenosarcoma (sist-ad-en-o-sar-ko'-mah) . See Cyst, Proligerous.
  • Cystalgia (sist-al'-je-ah) (cyst; aXyog, pain). Pain in the bladder.
  • Cystamin (sist'-am-in). A compound of formaldehyd and ammonia, used as a bac- tericide and antiseptic in cystitis and gout. Dose 5-10 gr. (0.33-0.66 Gm.).
  • Cystanastrophe (sist-an-as'-tro-fe). See In- version of Bladder.
  • Cystauchenotomy (sist - aw - ken - of - o - me) (cyst; auyrpj, neck of bladder; ~kp.vecv, to cut). A surgical incision into the neck of the bladder.
  • Cystectomy (sist-ek'-to-me) (cyst; inzefivecv, to cut out). Excision of the cystic duct.
  • Cystein (sist'-e-in) (cyst), C^NC^S. A compound obtained by reducing cystin; it is a crystalline powder, soluble in water, yielding an indigo -blue color with ferric chlorid; in the air it rapidly oxidizes to cystin. C, Reaction for. See Andreasch's Reaction for Cystein.
  • Cystencephalus (sist-en-sef -al-us) (cyst; EfK£(f)aX6c, the brain). A form of monstrosity in which the brain is replaced by a cyst-like structure.
  • Cysterethism (sist-er' -eth-izm) (cyst; ips.dcop.6g, irritation). Irritability of the bladder.
  • Cysthypersarcosis (sist - hi - per - sar - ko'- sis) (cyst; b%kp, over; oapKcootf, a fleshy excres- cence). Hypertrophy of the muscular walls of the bladder.
  • Cystic (sist'-ik) (cyst). 1. Pertaining to or resembling a cyst. 2. Pertaining to the urinary bladder or to the gall-bladder.
  • Cysticercoid (sist - e - ser' - koid) . Resembling Cysticercus: applied to any encysted tape- worm larva.
  • Cysticolithectomy (sist -ik-o- lith - ek'-to-me) (cystic duct; Xcdoc, a stone; eKxipvecv, to cut out). Von Greiffenhagen's operation for re- moval of calculi from the gall-bladder, con- sisting in opening the cystic duct alone and leaving the gall-bladder intact.
  • Cysticotomy Csist-ik-ot'-o-me) (cystic duct; xopi), a cutting). Incision into the cystic duct. Cystidolaparotomy (sist-id-o-lap-ar-of -o-me) (cystic duct; laparotomy). An abdominovesical incision.
  • Cystidotrachelotomy (sist-id-o-trak-el-ot'-o- me). See Cystauchenotomy .
  • Cystin (sist' -in) (cyst), C 3 H 7 N0 2 S. A substance found in the urine. It occurs in regular, colorless, six-sided tables, of very characteristic appearance. C, Test for. See Baumann and Goldmann, Liebig, Mueller.
  • Cystinemia (sist-in-e' -me-ah) (cystin; aliia, blood). The occurrence of cystin in the blood.
  • Cystinuria (sist-in-u' -re-ah) (cystin; oupov, urine). The presence of cystin in the urine.
  • Cystitis (sist-i 1 '-lis) (cyst; ncc, inflammation). Inflammation of the bladder.
  • Cystitome (sist' -it-om) . See Cystotome.
  • Cysto- (sis-to-) (kCoxcc, bladder). A prefix de- noting relation to the bladder.
  • Cystocele (sist'-o-sel) (cysto-; ktjXt), a hernia). A hernia of the bladder.
  • Cystocolostomy (sist-o-kol-os' -tom-e) (cysto-; colostomy). The surgical establishment of a per- manent passage from the bladder to the colon.
  • Cystoenterocele (sist-o-en'-ter-o-sel) (cysto-; evxepov, an intestine; /oj^,a hernia). A hernia containing a part of the bladder-and intestine.
  • Cystoepiplocele (sist-o-ep-ip' -lo-sel) (cysto-; kninXoov, the omentum; ktjXt), a hernia). Hernia of the bladder and of the omentum.
  • Cystoepithelioma (sist-o-ep-ilh-e-le-o'-mah) (cysto-; epithelioma). An epithelioma contain- ing cysts filled with fluid.
  • Cystogen (sist'-o-jen). See Formin.
  • Cystogenia, Cystogenesis (sist-o-je'-ne-ah, sisl- o-jen'-e-sis) (cysto-; ytvvav, to produce). The formation or genesis of cysts.
  • Cystohemia (sist-o-he' -me-ah) (cysto-; alua, blood). A congested condition of the bladder.
  • Cystoid (sist'-oid) (cyst; dooc, likeness). 1. Having the form or appearance of a cyst. 2. Composed of a collection of cysts. 3. A pseudocyst.
  • Cystomyoma (sist-o-mi-o'-mah). A myoma containing cysts.
  • Cystomyxoadenoma (sist - - miks - - ad - en-o'-mah). Cystomyxoma with adenoma.
  • Cystomyxoma (sist-o-miks-o'-mah). A myx- oma containing cysts.
  • Cystoneuralgia (sist-o-nu-ral'-je-ah) (cysto-; neu- ralgia). Neuralgia of the bladder; cystalgia.
  • Cystopexy (sist' -o-peks-e) (cysto-; tj^ic, fixation). Fixation of the bladder, an operation for the cure of cystocele.
  • Cystophlegmatic (sist-o-fleg-mat'-ik) (cysto-; cpXiypa, phlegm). Pertaining to vesical mucus. CYSTOPYELITIS 326 CYTOPHIL Cystopyelitis (sist-o-pi-el-i' -tis) (cysto-; pyelitis). Inflammation of the urinary bladder and the pelvis of the kidney.
  • Cystopyelonephritis (sist-o-pi-e-lo-nej-ri' -tis) . See Cystopyelitis.
  • Cystopyic (sist-o-pi'-ik). Relating to suppura- tion of the bladder.
  • Cystorectostomy (sist-o-rek-tos' -to-me) (cysto-; rectum; ozojia, a mouth). The formation of a fistula between the rectum and bladder.
  • Cystorrhaphy (sist-or'-af-e) (cysto-; pa^-q, a seam). . Suture of the bladder.
  • Cystorrhea (sist-or-e'-ah) (cysto-; po'ca, a flow), i. Vesical catarrh. 2. Vesical hemorrhage. 3. Polyuria.
  • Cystosarcoma (sist-o-sar-ko' '-mah) (cysto-; sar^ coma). Miiller's name for a sarcoma contain- ing cysts.
  • Cystoschisis (sist-osk f -is-is) (cysto-; 0x101$, a cleaving). A congenital fissure of the urin- ary bladder from imperfect development.
  • Cystoscirrhus (sist-o-skir' -us) (cysto-; oiuppbc, an induration). Scirrhus of the urinary blad- der.
  • Cystoscope (sist'-o-skdp) (cysto-; okoizuv, to examine). An instrument for inspecting the interior of the bladder.
  • Cystose (sist'-os) (cyst\ Cystic; full of cysts.
  • Cystospermitis (sist-o-sperm-i 1 '-tis) (cysto-; 07iipp.a, a seed; tzic, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the seminal vesicles.
  • Cystosteatoma (sist-o-ste-at-o'-mah). See Cyst, Sebaceous.
  • Cystotome (sist' -o-tdm) (see Cystotomy). A knife used in cystotomy; also a knife used in rupturing the capsule of the lens in cataract operations.
  • Cystotomy (sist-of '-o-me) (cysto-; zo/itj, a cutting).
  • Cytameba, Cytamoeba (sit-am-e'-bah). See Plasmodium malarice.
  • Cytase (si'-tdz). Metchnikoff's name for com- plement.
  • Cytitis (si-ti'-tis) (cutis; czee, inflammation). Dermatitis.
  • Cyto- (si-to-) (kuzoc, a cell). A prefix denoting relating to a cell.
  • Cytochemism (si-to-kem' -izm) (cyto-; pj^e/a, chemistry). The reaction of the living cell to chemic reagents, antitoxins, etc.
  • Cytochemistry (si-to-kem' -is-tre). The chem- istry of living cells.
  • Cytochrome (si'-to-krom) (cyto-; %pu)/ia, color). A term applied by Nissl to nerve-cells deficient in cell-protoplasm, the nucleus not being com- pletely surrounded. The nucleus stains well and is about the size of the leukocyte nucleus.
  • Cytoclasis (si-to -kla' -sis) (cyto-; aXav, to break; to weaken). Cell-necrosis.
  • Cytode (si'-tod) (cyto-; eldoc, form). The sim- plest, most primitive form of cell, without nu- cleus or nucleolus.
  • Cytodendrite (si-to-den' -drtt) (cyto-; divdpov, sl tree). Lenhossek's term for a truemedullated, cellulifugally conducting collateral fibril of a nerve-cell. Cf. Axodendrite.
  • Cytodiagnosis (si-to-di-ag-no'-sis). The deter- mination of the nature of a pathogenic liquid by the study of the cells it contains.
  • Cytodistal (si-to-dis'-tal) (cyto-; distare, to stand apart). Applied to that portion of an axon furthest removed from its cell of origin.
  • Cytogenesis (si-to-jen' -es-is) (cyto-; yeveocc, pro- duction). The formation or genesis of the cell.
  • Cytoglobin (si-to-glo' -bin) (cyto-; globus, a ball). An albuminoid, obtainable in the form of a white, soluble powder. It forms about 3 % of the pulp of the lymphatic glands.
  • Cytohydrolist (si-to-hi' -dro-list) (cyto-; hydroly- sis). An agent producing hydrolysis of cellu- lar substance.
  • Cytolymph (si' -to -Urn f) (cyto-; lympha, clear water). The ground-substance or matrix of the cytoplasm of cells.
  • Cytolysin (si-toV -is-in) (cyto-; Xbocq, a loosing). A substance capable of destroying cells, and resulting from inoculation by organic products. Cf. Epitheliolysin, Leuko cytolysin, Nephroly- sin, Spermolysin.
  • Cytolysis (si-tol'-is-is). Cell-dissolution.
  • Cytolytic. (si-to-lit'-ik). Relating to or con- cerned in cell-destruction.
  • Cytometer (si-tom' -et-er) (cyto-; fikxpov, a meas- ure). A device for counting cells, especially blood-corpuscles. See also Hemo cytometer.
  • Cytomicrosome (si-to-mik' -ro-som) (cyto-; p.c- Kpoc, small; ooo/ia, body). A microsome of cytoplasm.
  • Cytomitoma (si-to -mi-to'-mah) (cyto-; n'czog, a fiber). The fibrillar part of a cell-body. See Mi tome.
  • Cytomorphosis (si-to-mor-fo'-sis)^ (cyto-; p.6p- (pujocc, a, shaping).' A term proposed by Minot to designate comprehensively all the structural alterations which cells or successive generations of cells may undergo from the earliest undifferentiated stage to their final destruction.
  • Cytophagy (si-tof '-aj-e) (cyto-; (fraye'ev, to de- vour). The englobing of cells by other cells.
  • Cytophil (si f -to-fil) (cyto-; (j>delv, to love). The haptophorous group of the intermediary body CYTOPLASM 327 DACRYURIA with which it combines with the receptor of the cell.
  • Cytoplasm, Cytoplasma (si'-to-plazm, -plaz'- mah) (cyto-; nXaofia, anything formed), i. Protoplasm. 2. Cell -plasm other than that of the nucleus; the paraplasm and endo- plasm of a cell.
  • Cytoplastin (si-to-plas' '-tin) (cyto-; TiXaooecv, to mold). Schwartz's name for cell-protoplasm.
  • Cytoproximal (si-to-proks' -im-al) (cyto-; proxi- mare, to draw near). A term applied to that portion of an axon nearest its cell of origin.
  • Cytoreticulum (si-to-ret-ik' -u-lum) (cyto-; retic- ulum, a little net). Same as Cytomitoma.
  • Cytospongium (si-to-spun' -je-um) (cyto-; o-koj- yoc, sponge). The cell network or spongio- plasm containing in its meshes the hyalo- plasm. Cf. Mitome and Paramitome.
  • Cytothesis (si-to-the' -sis) (cyto-; Qkacg, a placing or arranging). Cell-repair.
  • Cytotoxin (si-to-toks'-in). See Cytolysin. Cf. Hemotoxin, Hepatotoxin, Leukotoxin, Neph- ro toxin, Spermatoxin.
  • Cytozoon (si-to-zo'-on) (cyto-; £(l>, a shrub). A genus of plants of the order Palmce. The inspissated juice of D. draco, a palm of Malaya, constitutes the finest cjragon's-blood. D. grandis, same habitat as D. draco, affords a variety of dragon's-blood.
  • Dahlin (dah'-lin). 1. An anilin dye obtained by the action of ethyl iodid on mauvein. It gives a reddish -purple color. 2. A form of inulin obtained from the roots of Inula helenium. See Inulin. Syn., Aluntin; Men- y anthin ; Sinistrin; Syantherin.
  • Dalton's Law, Dalton-Henry's Law. Al- though the volume of a gas absorbed by a liquid remains constant, the weight]] (volume multiplied by the density) of the absorbed gas rises and falls in proportion to its pressure.
  • Daltonian (dal-ton'-e-an). 1. Pertaining to John Dalton, an English chemist (1 766-1844). 2. A color-blind person.
  • Daltonism (dal'-ton-izm). Color-blindness.
  • Damar, Damaria (dam'-ar, dam-a'-re-ah). See Dammar.
  • Dambose (dam'-boz) (n'dambo, the African name), C 6 H 12 6 . A glucose derived from Gaboon caoutchouc. It forms hexagonal prisms, melts at 212 C, and is soluble in water.
  • Dammaran (dam-ar'-an). A neutral resin obtained from dammar.
  • Dammarin (dam'-ar-in). A resin extracted from dammar.
  • Damper (damp'-er) (ME., dampen, to choke).
  • Dandelion (dan' -de-li-on) . See Taraxacum.
  • Dandruff (dan' -druf) (origin unknown). The scurf or scales formed upon the scalp in seborrhea.
  • Dandy Fever (dan' -de). See Dengue.
  • Dansomania (dan-so-ma'-ne-ah). See Choro- mania.
  • Danta (dan'-tah) (Sp.). The American tapir, Tapirus americanus ; the powdered hoofs are employed as a sudorific and ae a remedy for epilepsy.
  • Daphne (daf'-ne). See Mezereon. DAPHNIN 329 DEAFNESS Daphnin (daf'-nin) (oacf>vr), laurel), C 16 H 16 9 + 2H 2 0. A glucosid from the bark of several species of Daphne.
  • Dartoid (dar'-toid) (dartos; etdoc, likeness). Resembling or consisting of the dartos.
  • Dartos (dar'-tos) \oapxbg, flayed). The con- tractile musculofibrous layer beneath the skin of the scrotum.
  • Dartrous (dar'-trus) (Fr., dartre). Of the nature of tetter or herpes; herpetic.
  • Darwin's Ear. A congenital deformity of the ear in which the helix is absent at the upper outer angle of the ear so that the free border forms a sharp point upward and outward. In another form a blunt point (Darwin's tubercle) projects from the upper portion of the helix toward the center of the ear.
  • Darwinism (dar r -win-izm) . The doctrine that higher organisms have been developed from lower forms by the influence of natural selec- tion, a theory advocated by Charles Darwin.
  • Daturism (dat'-u-rizm) (see Datura). Stra- monium-poisoning.
  • Dauciform (daw' -si-form). See Daucoid.
  • Daucoid (daw'-koid) \0auK0v, the carrot; eldoc; likeness). Resembling a carrot; dauciform.
  • Daughter (daw'-ter). A female child or de- scendant. D.-cell. See Cell, Daughter-. D.-cyst. See Cyst, Daughter-. D. -nuclei. See Karyokinesis. D.-star, an amphiaster. See Karyokinesis.
  • Davidsohn's Sign. The illumination of the pupil obtained on placing an electric light in the mouth will be less marked on the side on which there is a tumor or empyema of the antrum of Highmore.
  • Davy's Test for Phenol. To 1 or 2 drops of the phenol solution add 3 or 4 drops of a so- lution of 1 part molybdic acid in 10 or more parts of concentrated sulfuric acid. A pale yellowish-brown coloration is produced, which passes to reddish-brown and then to a beauti- ful purple.
  • Day-blindness. See Nyctalopia and Hemer- alopia.
  • Deacidification (de-as-id-if-ik-a'-shun). The act or process of neutralizing an acid.
  • Dealbate (de-al'-bat) (dealbatus, whitewashed). In biology, coated with a fine white down or powder.
  • Dealbation (de-al-ba' -shun) (see Dealbate). The process or act of becoming or being made white, as by bleaching.
  • Dealcoholization (de -al - ko-hol-i-za' -shun) . The removal of alcohol from an object or compound used in microscopic technic. D. -agent, a liquid employed for the purpose of getting rid of the alcohol in preserved specimens, and to facilitate the penetration of paraffin in microtomy.
  • Deambulation (de-am-bu-la' -shun) (deambu- lare, to take a walk). Gentle exercise as by walking.
  • Deanesthesiant (de-an-es-the'-ze-ant) (de, from; dvacadfjoca, want of feeling). A means for arousing the system from a state of anesthesia.
  • Deaquation (de-ak-wa' '-shun) (de, from; aqua, water). The act or process of removing water from a substance.
  • Deargentation (de-ar-jen-ta' '-shun) (deargen- tare, to plate with silver). The act or process of silvering.
  • Dearterialization (de-ar-te-re-al-i-za' -shun) (de, from; arterial ization). The transformation of the blood from the arterial to the venous state. Cf. Atmospherization.
  • Dearticulation (de-ar-tik-u-la'-shun). See Di- arthrosis, Disarticulation, Dislocation.
  • Deauration (de-aw-ra'-shun) (deaurare, to gild). The act or process of gilding.
  • Debilitant (de-b 11' -it-ant) (debilitare, to weaken). 1. An agent allaying excitement. 2. Weak- ening.
  • Debility (de-biV -it-e) . See Asthenia. D., Nervous. See Neurasthenia.
  • Debove's Disease. Splenomegaly. D.'s Membrane. See Membrane, Debove's.
  • Debridement (da-bred-mon(g)) (Ft.). The enlargement of a wound or hernia in oper- ating.
  • Deca- (dek-a-) (dim, ten). Ten; prefixed to the units of weight, capacity, and length in the metric system, it signifies a measure ten times as large as the unit. See Metric System.
  • Decalcification (de-kal-sif-ik-a'-shun) (de, priv.; calx, lime; facere, to make). The withdrawal of the lime-salts of bone.
  • Decalcify (de-kaV -sif-i) (see Decalcification). To remove lime-salts from tissues. Decalvant (de-kal'-vant) (decalvans, depila- tory). Destroying hair.
  • Decantation (de-kan-ta' -shun) (de, down; cantus, a side). The operation of removing the supernatant fluid from a sediment.
  • Decapitation (de-kap-it-a' -shun) (de, from; caput, head). The act of beheading, espe- cially as performed on the fetus when other means of delivery have failed.
  • Decarbonated (de-kar'-bon-a-ted). Deprived of carbonic acid.
  • Decarbonization, Decarburation, Decarbu- rization (de-kar-bon-i-za' -shun, de-kar-bu-ra' - shun, de-kar-bu-ri-za' -shun). The act or pro- cess of freeing a substance from carbon.
  • Decay (de-ka') (de, down; cadere, to fall). 1. Putrefactive change. 2. The ultimate kata- bolic state; decline of life, of health, or of one or more functions.
  • Decemcostate (de-sem-kos'-tdt) (decern, ten; cosla, a rib)? Having ten ribs.
  • Decemfid (de' '-sem-fid) (decern; findere, to divide). Cut into ten parts.
  • Decemipara (de-sem-ip' -ar-ah) (decern; parere, to bring forth). A woman pregnant for the tenth time.
  • Decentered (de-sent' -erd) (de, from; center). Out of common center; said of lenses as to focus, or of masses as to equilibrium, etc.
  • Decentration (de-sen-tra' -shun) (see Decentered). Removal from a center.
  • Decerebrated (de-ser'-e-bra-ted). Decerebrized.
  • Decerebrize (de-ser' -e-brlz) (de, from; cere- brum). To remove the brain, as of a frog, in physiologic experiments; decerebrate.
  • Deci- (des-e-) (decern, ten). A prefix which, joined to the metric units of length, capacity, and weight, signifies a measure one-tenth as large as the unit. See Metric System.
  • Deciduation (de-sid-u-a' '-shun) . The act or process of dropping off or shedding.
  • Deciduitis (de-sid-u-i'-tis). Inflammation of the decidual membranes of the gravid uterus.
  • Deciduosarcoma (de-sid-u-o-sar-ko'-mah). See Deciduoma malignum.
  • Deciduous (de-sid' -u-us) (de, away from; cadere, to fall). Falling off. D. Teeth, the temporary teeth or milk-teeth.
  • Decinormal (des-e-nor'-mal) \deci-; norma, nor- - mal). Having one-tenth the strength of the normal.
  • Declination (dek-lin-a' -shun) (decline). . The dip of the magnetic needle.
  • Declinator (dek' -lin-a-tor) (decline). An in- strument for holding the dura apart during trephining.
  • Decline (de-klin') (declinare, to bend). A gradual decrease, as of a fever; a wasting away of the bodily strength.
  • Declive (de-kliv') (declivis, sloping). i. A lower or descending part. 2. See Declivis cerebelli.
  • Declivis cerebelli (de-kli'-vis ser-e-bel'-i) (L.). The sloping posterior aspect of the monticulus.
  • Decoction (de-kok' -shun) (decoquere, to boil down). A liquid preparation obtained by boiling vegetable substances in water.
  • Decollation (de-kol-a' '-shun) . See Decapita- tion.
  • Decollator (de-kol f -a-tor) (decollare, to behead). An instrument for fetal decapitation.
  • Decolorant (de-kul'-or-ant) (de, priv.; color). An agent for the altering or removal of color.
  • Decoloration (de-kul-or-a* '-shun) (decolorare, to deprive of color). Removal of color.
  • Decombustion (de-kom-bust'-yun). See De- oxidation.
  • Decompensation (de-kom-pen-sa' -shun) (de, priv.; compensare, to compensate). Failure of compensation (as of the circulation or of the heart).
  • Decompose (de-kom-poz'). 1. To cause a compound to break up into its simpler con- stituents. 2. To undergo putrefaction.
  • Decomposition (de-kom-po-zish' '-un) (decom- ponere, to decompose). 1. The separation of the component principles of a body. 2. Pu- trefactive fermentation. Decompression (de-kom-presh' '-un) . The re- moval of compression or pressure.
  • Decortication (de-kor-tik-a' -shun) (de, from; cortex, the bark). 1. The stripping of the bark or husk of a plant. 2. The stripping off of portions of the cortical substance of the brain from the summits of the gyri.
  • Decostate (de-kos'-tat) (de, from; costa, a rib). Without ribs.
  • Decrement (dek' -re-ment) . See Decline.
  • Decrepitation (de-krep-it-a' -shun) (decrepitare, to crackle). A crackling or crepitation.
  • Decrustation (de - krust - a' - shun) (de, from; crusta, a crust). The detachment of a crust.
  • Decubital (de-ku' -bit-al) . Relating to a de- cubitus or to a bed-sore.
  • Decubitus (de-ku' -bit-us) (decumbere, to lie down). 1. The recumbent or horizontal pos- ture. 2. A bed-sore. D., Acute, a form of bed-sore due to cerebral lesions. D., Andral's. See under Sign.
  • Decurtation (de-kur-ta'-shun) (decurtare, to curtail). The ablation or shortening of a structure or usual duration of a condition.
  • Decurvature (de-kurv' -a-chur) (decurvatus, bent back). A descending curvature.
  • Decussate (de-kus'-dt) (see Decussation). To intersect; to cross.
  • Decussorium (de-kus-o' -re-um) (L.). An in- strument for depressing the dura after trephin- ing.
  • Dedalous, Dgedalous (ded'-al-us) (dacdaXeoc, curiously wrought). Labyrinthiform; in- tricately wrought.
  • Dedentition (de-den-tish' -un) (de, down; dens, a tooth). The shedding of the teeth.
  • Dedolation (ded-o-la' -shun) (dedolatio, a hewing off). A cutting off obliquely.
  • Deep (dip). Not superficial. D. Reflexes. See under Reflex. D. Water, water obtained from a porous layer beneath the first imper- vious stratum.
  • Def erentiovesical (def-er-en-she-o-ves'-ik-al) . Pertaining to both the vas deferens and the bladder.
  • Defecation (def-ek-a'-shun) (defcecare, to sep- arate from the dregs), i. The . evacuation of the bowels. 2. Clarification, as of wine. Cf. Decantation.
  • Deferent (def -er-ent) (deferens, carrying away). Carrying away or down; efferent.
  • Deferentectomy (def-er-ent-ek'-to-me). Exci- sion of the vas deferens.
  • Deferential (def-er-en'-shal). Pertaining to the vas deferens.
  • Deferentitis (def-er-en-ti'-tis) (deferens; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of the vas deferens.
  • Defervescence (de-fer-ves'-ens) (defervescere, ■ to cease boiling). Disappearance of fever.
  • Defibrination (de-fl-brin-a'-shun) (de, from; fibra, a fiber). The removal of fibrin from blood or lymph.
  • Defining Power (de-fi'-ning). See Definition.
  • Definition (def-in-ish'-un) (definire, to bound by limits). In optics, the power of a magni- fying lens to show clear outlines of the object examined, free from aberration or distortion.
  • Deflagration (def-lag-ra' -shun) (deflagrare, to be consumed). A sudden, 'violent com- bustion, such as % accompanies the oxidation of certain inorganic substances by mixing them with an easily decomposing salt, such as the alkaline chlorates and nitrates.
  • Deflagrator (def-la-gra'-tor) (see Deflagration). An apparatus for producing very rapid combustion. D., Hare's. See Battery, Hare's.
  • Deflect (de-flekf) (deflecto, to bend away). To turn or bend from a straight course.
  • Defluvium capillorum (de-flu' -ve-um kap-il- or'-um). Alopecia.
  • Defluxion (de-fluk'-shun) (de, down; fluere, to flow). A discharge.
  • Deformation (de-for-ma' -shun) (deformare, to deform). The process of disfigurement. D., Sprengel's, congenital upward displacement of one of the scapulas. D., Volkmann's, congenital tibiotarsal dislocation.
  • Deformity (de-for'-mi-te). Abnormal shape or structure of a body or part. D., Anterior. See Lordosis. Defunctionalization (de-funk-shun-al-iz-a r - shun). The act of destroying a function.
  • Defurfuration (de-fur -fur -a f -shun) (de, from; furfur, bran). Desquamation.
  • Defuselation (de-fu-sel-a' -shun) . The removal of fusel oil from spirits.
  • Defusion (de-fu'-zhun). See Decantation.
  • Deganglionate (de-gan' -gle-on-dt) . To remove ganglions.
  • Degenerate (de-jen'-er-at) (see Degeneration). 1. To revert to a lower type. 2. An individual who has reverted to a lower type.
  • Deglabration (deg-la-bra' '-shun) (deglabrare, to make smooth). The process of becoming bald.
  • Deglutitio impedita (de-glu-tish' -e-o im-ped- i'-tah). Synonym of Dysphagia.
  • Deglutition (deg-lu-tish' -un) (deglutitio, a swal- lowing). The act of swallowing.
  • Degustation (de-gus-ta' '-shun) (degustare, to taste). The act of tasting.
  • Dehiscence (de-his' -ens) (de, off; hiscere, to gape or yawn). The act of splitting open. D.s, Zuckerkandl's, small gaps sometimes existing in the papyraceous lamina of the ethmoid bone, and bringing the lining mem- brane of the latter in contact with the dura. They are not pathologic.
  • Dehydratation (de-hi-dra-ta' -shun) . The re- moval of hydrogen from a compound by means of reducing agents, by heating, or by the action of strong acids on hydrocarbons. Cf. Dehydration.
  • Dehydration (de-hi-dra' -shun) (de, away from; udcop, water). The removal of water.
  • Dehydrogenize (de-hi' -dro-jen-iz) . To deprive of hydrogen.
  • Dehydrotriacetonamin (de-hi-dro-tri-as-et-on- am'-in). A substance acting as a base obtained from acetone by action of ammonia. Syn., Acetonin.
  • Deintoxication (de-in-toks-ik-a 1 '-shun) (de, from; intoxication). The process of over- coming the effects of toxic substances.
  • Deintoxification (de-in-toks-i-ik-a' -shun) . See Detoxification.
  • Dejecta (de-jek' -tah) (L.). Feces.
  • Dejection (de-jek' -shun) (dejecta). The dis- charge of fecal matter; the matter so dis- charged.
  • Dejecture (de-jek' -chur) (dejecta). Matter evacuated from the intestine; feces.
  • Dejerine's Disease. Hypertrophic interstitial neuritis of infancy.
  • Dejerine-Sottas' Disease, D.-S.'s Type of Muscular Atrophy. See Dejerine's Disease.
  • Delaceration (de-las-er-a' -shun) (delacerare). To tear to pieces or lacerate severely.
  • Delactation (de-lak-ta' -shun) . See Ablactation.
  • Delamination (de-lam -in-a' -shun) (de, away; lamina, a plate). The splitting into layers.
  • Delhi Boil (del' -he). See Furunculus ori- en talis.
  • Deligation (del-ig-a' -shun) (deligatio, a bind- ing). Ligation, as of an artery.
  • Delimitation (de-lim-it^a' -shun) (delimitare, to mark out). The determination of the limits of areas, regions, or organs in physical diag- nosis.
  • Deliquation, Deliquiation (del-ik-wa' -shun, del-ik-wi-a' -shun) . Deliquescence.
  • Deliquescence (del-ik-wes' -ens) (deliquescere, to melt away).- A liquefaction by absorption of water from the atmosphere.
  • Deliquescent (del-ik-wes' -ent) (see Deliques- cence). Dissolving: applied especially to salts that absorb moisture from the air and liquefy.
  • Deliriant, Delirifacient (de-W -re-ant, de- le-re- j a' -she-ent) (delirium). Producing de- lirium.
  • Delirious (de-le' -re-us) (delirium). Affected with delirium.
  • Delitescence (del-it-es' -ens) (delitescere, to lie hid) The sudden disappearance of inflam- mation by resolution.
  • Deliver (de-liv'-er) (de, -from; liberare, to free). To free from something, especially to deliver a woman of a child or of the after- birth. The word is also applied to the part removed, as to deliver the placenta or a tumor.
  • Delivery (de-liv'-er -e) (see Deliver). The act of delivering or freeing from something, espe- cially the relieving of a woman from the con- tents of the uterus; parturition; childbirth. D., Postmortem, the birth of a fetus after the death of the mother.
  • Delomorphous (del-o-mor' -fus) (drjXoc, con- spicuous; jiopcfyf), form). Having a conspicu- ous form. D. Cells of Rollet, large, well- defined cells between the membrana propria and the chief cells of the fundus glands of the gastric mucous* membrane. They are supposed to secrete the hydrochloric acid.
  • Delphinin, Delphinium, Delphinoidin, Delphisin (del' -fin-in, del-fin' -e-um, del-fin- oid'-in, del'-fis-in). See Staphisagria.
  • Deltoid (del'-toid) (delta, the Greek letter A; eldoc, likeness). Having the shape of the Greek letter delta; triangular, as the deltoid 'muscle. See under Muscle.
  • Delusional (de-lu' -zhun-al) (delusion). Of the nature of a delusion; characterized by delusions. D. Stupor. See Insanity, Con- fusional. Demagnetize (de-mag' -net-lz) . To deprive an object of magnetic properties.
  • Demarcation (de-mar k-a' -shun) (demarcare, - to set the bounds of). Separation. D., Line of, a red line forming at the edge of a gan- grenous area and marking the limit of the process.
  • Demedication (de-med-ik-a' -shun) . The re- moval of deleterious drugs from the system, as lead, arsenic, or phosphorus, by the re- versal of the electric current used in cataphor- esis, in a suitably arranged bath.
  • Dement (de'-ment) (dementia). A person suf- fering with dementia.
  • Dementation (de - men - ta' - shun) (dementia). Loss of mind; insanity.
  • Demented (de-ment'-ed). Deprived of reason.
  • Demifacet (dem-e-fas'-et) (demi-; facet). One- half of an articulation surface adapted to articulate with two bones.
  • Demilune Cells, Heidenhain's (dem'-e-lun). Crescentic bodies lying between the cells and the membrana propria of an acinus of a salivary gland.
  • Demipenniform (dem-e-pen' -e-form) (demi-; penna, a wing). Applied to structures or organs which have one of two margins winged.
  • Demodex (dem' -o-deks) (drjjiof, fat; dr)$, an insect). A genus of parasitic insects. D. folliculorum, Jhe pimple-mite, a minute parasite found in the sebaceous follicles, par- ticularly of the face. It probably does not produce any symptoms.
  • Demonomy (de-mon'-om-e) (ofjp.oc, the people; vofxof, a law; a custom). The science of humanity.
  • Demonophobia (de-mon-o-fo' -be-ah) (dacptov, a devil; (frofiog, fear). Morbid dread of devil and demons.
  • Demorphinization (de-morf-in-i-za' -shun) (de, from; morphin). Treatment of morphinism by gradual withdrawal of the drug.
  • Demulcent (de-muV '-sent) (demulcere, to soothe). i. Soothing; allaying irritation of surfaces, especially mucous membranes. 2. A soothing substance, particularly a slippery, mucilagin- ous liquid.
  • Denarcotized (de-nar' '-ko-tlzd) (de, priv.; vapKioycKoc, narcotic). 1. Deprived of nar- cotizing qualities. 2. Of opium, deprived of narcotin.
  • Denaturization (de-nat-u-ri-za' -shun) (de, priv.; natura, nature). Alteration in the character- istics of an organic substance by chemic action, boiling, or addition.
  • Dendraxon (den-draks'-on) (dendron; axon). Von Lenhossek's term for a neuron with a short axon, its axonal processes being for the most part devoid of sheaths.
  • Dendric (den'-drik) (dendron). Provided with dendrons.
  • Dendrite (den'-drit). See Dendron.
  • Dendritic (den-drif Ak) (dendron). Branch- ing like a tree.
  • Dendron (den'--dron) (dhdpov, a tree). One of the short, free projections or socalled proto- plasmic processes of a nerve-cell.
  • Denguis (den'-gwis). Synonym of Dengue.
  • Denidation (de-ni-da'-shun) (de, priv.; nidus, a nest). The disintegration and ejection of the superficial part of the uterine mucosa.
  • Denigration (de-ni-gra' -shun) (denigrare, to blacken). The act or process of rendering black; the state of having become black.
  • Denitration (de-ni-tra' -shun) . The process of taking away nitric acid from a com- pound.
  • Denitrify (de-ni f -tre-fi) (de, priv.; nitrogen). To remove nitrogen.
  • Denitrifying (de-ni'-tre-fi-ing). Applied to bacteria which reduce nitric acid to nitrous acid and ammonia.
  • Densimeter (den-sim'-et-er) (densus, dense; fxhpov, a measure). An appliance for ascer- taining the specific gravity of a liquid.
  • Density (den'-sit-e) (densitas, thickness). Close- ness; compactness, especially the degree of closeness of one body compared with an equal volume of another taken as a standard; specific gravity. In electricity, the amount of electricity accumulated on a unit of surface during a given time.
  • Dentagra (den-ta' -gr ah) (dens, a tooth; ay pa, a seizure). 1. Toothache. 2. A tooth- forceps.
  • Dentaphone (den'-ta-fon) (dens; (^ojutj, sound). An instrument placed on the teeth to aid in hearing.
  • Dentata (den-ta' -tali) . See Axis (2).
  • Dentate (den' -tat) (dens). Toothed; having a toothed or serrated edge. D. Body. See Corpus dentatum. D. Convolution, a convolution found in the hippocampal fis- sure. D. Fascia, the serrated free edge of the dentate convolution. D. Fissure, the hippocampal fissure.
  • Dentation (den-ta' -shun) . The formation of tooth-like structures, as on the margin of a leaf.
  • Dentatum (den-ta' -turn) (L.). The dentate nucleus of the cerebellum.
  • Dentelation (den-tel-a' -shun) . The condition of being furnished with tooth-like processes, DENTES 336 DEPIGMENTATION Dentes (den'-tez) (L. plural of dens, a tooth). Teeth. D. sapientise, wisdom-teeth; the third molar teeth.
  • Denticle (den'-tik-l) (denticulus, a small tooth). A small tooth or projecting point.
  • Denticulate (den-tik' -u-lat) (denticle). Having minute dentations; furnished with small teeth or notches.
  • Dentifrice (den'-tif-ris) (dens; fricere, to rub). A substance for cleansing the teeth.
  • Dentigerous (den-tif '-er-us) (dens; gerere, to carry). Bearing or containing teeth, as a dentigerous cyst.
  • Dentilave (den'-te-ldv) (dens; lavare, to wash). A mouth-wash or tooth-wash.
  • Dentinal (den' -tin-al) (dentin). Pertaining to or composed of dentin.
  • Dentinification (den-tin-if-ik-a' -shun) (dentin; facer e, to make). The formation of dentin through the agency of specialized cells, the odontoblasts.
  • Dentinoid (den' -tin-oid) . i. Similar to dentin. 2. Pertaining to an odontoma.
  • Dentinosteoid (den-tin-os' -te-oid) (dentin; 6az- eov, bone). A tumor of dentin and bone.
  • Dentiporous (den-tip' -or -us) (dens; Tibpoc, a pore). Having pores with toothed edges.
  • Dentist (den'-tist) (dens). One who practises dentistry.
  • Dentistry (den' -tis-tre) . Dental surgery, em- bracing everything pertaining to the treatment of diseases of the teeth.
  • Dentition (den-tish' -un) (dens). Teething; Incisors. Canine. Milk molars. The Temporary Teeth.
  • Dentoiletta (dent-wah-let'-ah). A device con- sisting of two mirrors so arranged that per- sons may examine their own teeth.
  • Dentola (den'-to-lah). A solution used on swollen gums, said to consist of cocain hy- drochlorid, 1 part; potassium bromid, 10 parts; glycerol and water, each, 200 parts.
  • Dentolingual (den-to4ing' -wal) . Pertaining to the teeth and the tongue or lingual nerve.
  • Dentoliva (den-toV -iv-ah) (dens; oliva, an olive). The olivary nucleus.
  • Dentomental (den-to -ment' -at). Pertaining to the teeth and chin.
  • Dentonasal (den-to-na'-zal) . Pertaining to the teeth and nose.
  • Denture (den'-chur) (dens). 1. The entire set or group of teeth; the whole assemblage of teeth in both jaws. 2. A set, or plate, of arti- ficial teeth.
  • Denucleated (de-nu' -kle-a-ted) . Deprived of the nucleus.
  • Denudation (den-u-da' -shun) (denudare, to denude). A stripping or making bare.
  • Denutrition (de-nu-trish' -un) (de, from; nutriare, to nourish). 1. Faulty or absent nutrition. 2. An atrophy and degeneration of tissue arising from lack of nutrition.
  • Deobstruent (de-ob' -stru-ent) (de; obstruere, to obstruct). 1. Removing obstruction. 2. A medicine that removes obstruction; an aperient.
  • Deodorant (de-o' -dor-ant) (de; odor are, to smell).
  • Deodoriferant (de-o -dor -if -er -ant) (see Deo- dorant), 1. Possessing the power of over- coming bad odors. 2. See Deodorant.
  • Deodorized (de-o' -dor -izd) (see Deodorant). Deprived of odor.
  • Deoppilant, Deoppilative (de-op' -il-ant, -at- iv) (de; oppilare, to stop). The same as Deobstruent.
  • Deorsum (de-or' -sum) (L.). Downward.
  • Deorsumduction (de-or -sum-duk' -shun) . A downward movement, as of the eye.
  • Deoxidation (de-oks-id-a'-shun) (de, from; oxygen). The removal of the oxygen from a chemic compound.
  • Deoxygenation (de-oks-e-jen-a'-shun). See Deoxidation.
  • Dephlegmation (de --fie g-ma' -shun) (de, from; (frXeyecv, to burn). The removal of water by distillation.
  • Dephlegmator (de-fleg'-mat-or). That part of a still adapted to receive the vapors of such compounds as are condensed at successively lower and lower temperatures.
  • Depigmentation (de-pi g-ment-a 1 '-shun) . The removal of natural pigments from the skin DEPILATE 337 DERMATALGIA or from microscopic preparations by the action of weak solutions of bleaching or oxidizing solutions.
  • Depilate (dep'-il-at) (depilare, to remove the hair). To remove the hair.
  • Depilation (dep-il-a' -shun) (depilate). The re- moval or loss of the hair.
  • Depilatory (de-piV -at-o-re) (depilate), i. Hav- ing the power to remove the hair. 2 . A sub- stance, usually a caustic alkali, used to destroy the hair.
  • Depilous (dep'-il-us) (depilate). Hairless.
  • Deplanate (dep'-lan-dt) (deplanare, to level). Leveled; flattened Depletion (de-ple' -shun) (deplere, to empty). 1. The act of diminishing the quantity of fluid in the body or in a part, especially by bleeding. 2. The condition of the system produced by the excessive loss of blood or other fluids.
  • Deplumation (de-plu-ma' -shun) (de, down; off; pluma, feather). The loss of the eyelashes.
  • Depolarization (de-po-lar-iz-a' -shun) (de; polus, pole). The neutralization of polarity.
  • Depolarizer (de-po'-lar-i-zer). A refracting plate used with a polarizer which resolves the polarized ray into ordinary and extraor- dinary rays.
  • Deportation (de-por-ta' -shun) (de; portare, to bear). Veit's term for the process in which the chorionic fringes are detached and lose all connection with the fetal placenta.
  • Deposit (de-poz'-it) (de; ponere, to place). A sediment; a collection of morbid particles in a body.
  • Depositive (de-poz' -it-iv) (deposit). A term applied to that state of the skin in which lymph is poured out and papules arise.
  • Depravation (dep-rav-a' -shun) (depravare, to vitiate). A deterioration or morbid change in the secretions, tissues, or functions of the body.
  • Depressant (de-pres'-ant) (see Depression). 1. Lowering. 2. A medicine that diminishes functional activity.
  • Depressed (de-prest') (see Depression). 1. Referring to a state of lowered vitality; affected with depression. 2. Having the dor- solateral diameter reduced. 3. Flattened from above downward.
  • Depression (de-presh'-un) (deprimere, to de- press). 1. A hollow or fossa. 2. Inward displacement of a part, as of the skull. 3. Lowering of vital functions under the action of some depressing agent.
  • Depressomotor (de-pres-o-mo' -tor) (depression; mover e, to move). An agent that dimin- ishes the action of the motor apparatus.
  • Depurated (dep' -u-ra-ted) (see Depurator). Purified; cleansed.
  • Depurative (dep' -u-ra-tiv) (see Depurator). Purifying or cleansing.
  • Depurator (dep'-u-ra-tor) (depurare, to purify). A drug or device for aiding a cleansing process.
  • Deradelphus (der -ad-el' -f us) (deprj, neck; adekcfroc, brother). A monocephalic dual monstrosity, with fusion of the bodies above the umbilicus, and with four lower extremities and three or four upper.
  • Deradenitis (der-ad-en-i' -tis) (deprj, neck; ddr)v, a gland; tree, inflammation). Inflammation of the cervical glands.
  • Deradenoncus (der-ad-en-ong' -kus) (deprj, neck; ddr)v, a gland; ofKo^, mass). Swelling of a neck-gland.
  • Derangement (de-ran j' '-men t). Disorder of intellect; insanity.
  • Derbyshire Neck (der'-be-shir). See Goiter.
  • Derencephalocele (der-en-se' '-al-o-sel) (deprj, neck; encephalocele). Hernia of the brain through a fissure in the cervical vertebras.
  • Derencephalus (der-en-se' -al-us) (deprj, neck; iyK£ecv, to write). The description of the ligaments.
  • Desmohemoblast (des-mo-hem'-o-blasi). See Desmoblast.
  • Desmoid (des'-moid) (desmo-; eldog, likeness). Fibrous. D. Tumor, a fibroid tumor.
  • Desmology (des-moV -o-je) (desmo-; Xoyoc, science). The anatomy of the ligaments. Cf. Syndesmography.
  • Desmoma (des-mo 1 '-mah) (desmo-; opa, tumor). A connective-tissue tumor.
  • Desmon (des'-mon) (deopoc, a band). London's name for the intermediary body of Ehrlich.
  • Desmoneoplasm (des-mo-ne' '-o-plazm) (desmo-; neoplasm). Any neoplasm made up of con- nective tissue.
  • Desmonosology (des-mon-os-oV -o-je) . See Des- mo pathology.
  • Desmopathology (des-mo-path-oV -o-je) (desmo-; pathology). The pathology of ligaments.
  • Desmopexia (des-mo-peks' -e-ah) (desmo-; izfficc, a putting together). Fixation of the round ligaments to the abdominal wall or to the wall of the vagina for correction of uterine dis- placement.
  • Desmorrhexis (des-mor-eks' -is) (desmo-; pij£cc, a bursting). The rupture of a ligament.
  • Desmotomy (des-mot'-o-me) (desmo-; to/jltj, section). The dissection and anatomy of the ligaments; surgical cutting of a ligament.
  • Desmurgia, Desmurgy (des-mur'-je-ah, des- mur'-je) (desmo-; epyecv, to do; to work). The art of bandaging or applying ligatures.
  • Desquamative (des-kwam' -at-iv) (desquama- tion). Characterized by desquamation.
  • Dessertspoon. A domestic measure equal to about 2 dr. (8 Cc).
  • Desudation (des-u-da' -shun) (de, away; sudare, to sweat). i. Profuse or morbid sweating. 2. Sudamina.
  • Desulfuration, Desulfurization (de-sul-fur-a'- shun, de-sul-jur-i-za' -shun) . The act or pro- cess of abstracting sulfur from a compound. Cf. Sul juration.
  • Desumvergence (de-swn-ver 1 '-jenz) (desursum, from above; vergere, to turn). A downward inclination of the eyes.
  • Detergent (de-ter' -jent) (deter gere, to cleanse). Purifying; cleansing.
  • Determination (de-ter -min-a' -shun) (deter- mination a directing). Of the blood, a ten- dency to collect in a part, as determination of the blood to the head.
  • Dethyroidism (de-thi' -roid-izm) . See Athyrea and Athyreosis.
  • Detorsion (de-tor' -shun) (detorquere, to turn). The correction of an abnormal curvature; the restoration of a deformed part to its normal position.
  • Detoxification (de-toks-if-ik-a'-shun) (de, priv.; to^ikov, poison). The power of reducing the poisonous properties of a substance.
  • Detoxify (de-toks'-e-fi) . To deprive a substance of its poisonous attributes.
  • Detrital (de-tri' -tal) . Consisting of or pertain- ing to detritus.
  • Detrition (de-trish' '-un) (deter ere, to wear off). The wearing or wasting of a part.
  • Detritus (de-tri' -tus) (see Detrition). Waste- matter from disorganization.
  • Detruncation (de-trun-ka' -shun) . See De- capitation.
  • Detrusion (de-tru'-zhun) (detrudere, to drive). An ejection or expulsion; a thrusting or driving down or out.
  • Detrusor, Detrusprium (de-tru'-zor, -zor'-e-um). i. A means or instrument for performing expulsion. 2. A muscle having as its function the forcing down or out of parts or materials.
  • Deuter-, Deutero- (du-ter-, du-ter-o-) (dea- rs po, second). Greek prefixes indicating the second of two similar substances or con- ditions, especially that one which contains more of the substance.
  • Deuteripara (du-ter-ip'-ar-ah) (deuter-; parere, to bring forth). A woman pregnant for the second time. DEUTEROALBUMOSE 342 DEXTROPEDAL Deuteroalbumose (du-ter-o-aV -bii-mos) . A form soluble in water and not precipitated by saturation with sodium chlorid or magnesium sulfate, but by ammonium sulfate.
  • Deutero toxins (du-ter-o-toks' -ins) . Dissocia- tion products of toxins.
  • Deuterology (du-ter-oV-o-je) (deutero-; Xoyog, science). The biology of the placenta.
  • Deuteromyosinose (du-ter-o-mi-o'-sin-ds). A product of myosin digestion.
  • Deuteropathy (du-ter-op' -a-the) (deutero-; nadoc, a disease). A disease that is second- ary to another.
  • Deuteroplasm (du'-ter-o-plazm). See Deuto- plasm.
  • Deuterostoma (du-ter-os' -to-mah) (deutero-; oxojia, mouth). A secondary blastopore.
  • Deutipara (du-tip'-ar-ah). See Deuteripara.
  • Deutoplasm (du'-to-plazm) (deutero-; TiXaapta, formed material). A store of nutrient ma- terial in the ovum, from which the protoplasm draws to support its growth.
  • Deutosclerous (du-to-skle 1 '-rus) (deutero-; GK.\f)p6c, hard). Relating to an induration secondary to some pathologic condition.
  • Deutyl (du'-til). See Ethyl.
  • Devaporation (de-va-por-a'-shun). To bring vapor back to the liquid state.
  • Developer (de-vel'-op-er). A chemic compound employed in photography to reduce the me- tallic salts and to render visible the image upon an exposed plate.
  • Deviation (de-ve-a' 'shun) (deviare, to deviate). A turning away from the regular course or standard. D., Conjugate, the turning of eyes and head toward one side, observed in some lesions of the cerebrum.
  • Devitalize (de-vi' -tal-iz) (de, from; vita, life). To destroy vitality.
  • Devitrif action, Devitrification (de-vit-re-faW- shun, de-vit-re-fi-ka' -shun) (de, priv.; vitrum, glass; facere, to make). To change from the glass-like state.
  • Devolution (dev-o-lu! -shun) (devolvere, to roll down). i. Transmission from one person to another. 2. Degeneration.
  • Devonshire Colic (dev f -on-shlr kol'-ik). Lead- colic.
  • Devorative (de-vor'-at-iv) (devorare, to swallow down). Intended to be swallowed without chewing.
  • Dew-cure (du'-kur). See Kneippism.
  • Dexiocardia (deks-e-o-kar'-de-ah). See Dex- trocardia. Right; upon the right ad, to). . Toward Dexter (deks'-ter) (L.). side.
  • Dextral (deks' -tral) . 1. Pertaining to the right side. 2. Showing preference for the right eye, hand, foot, etc., in certain acts or func- tions.
  • Dextrality (deks-traV-it-e) (dexter). The condition of turning toward, being on, or pertaining to the right side.
  • Dextran (deks'-tran) (dexter), C 6 H 10 O 5 . A stringy, gummy substance formed in milk by the action of cocci, and also occurring in unripe beet-root.
  • Dextraural (deks-traw 1 '-ral) (dexter; auris, the ear). Right-eared.
  • Dextrin (deks f -trin) (dexter), C 6 H 10 O 5 . A soluble carbohydrate into which starch is converted by diastase or dilute acids. It is a whitish substance, turning the plane of polarization to the right.
  • Dextrinate (deks' -trin-dt) . To change into dextrin.
  • Dextrinuria (deks-trin-u' -re-ah) (dextrin; oupov, urine). The presence of dextrin in the urine.
  • Dextro- (deks-tro-) (dexter). A prefix meaning right.
  • Dextrocardia (deks-tro-kar'-de-ah). (dextro-; Kapd'ca, heart). Transposition of the heart to the right side of the thorax.
  • Dextrocardial (deks-tro-kar' '-de-al) (see Dex- trocardia). Having the heart to the right of the median line.
  • Dextrocerebral (deks-tro-ser 1 '-e-bral) (dextro-; cerebrum, the brain). 1. Located in the right cerebral hemisphere. 2. Functionating pre- ferentially with the right side of the brain.
  • Dextrococain (deks-tro-ko'-kah-in). An arti- ficial alkaloid obtained by heating ecgonin or its derivative with strong alkali. It is a local anesthetic and stimulant, in action similar to cocain, but more rapid, irritating, and fugitive. Syn., Isococain.
  • Dextrocular (deks-trok' -u-lar) (dextro-; oculus, the eye). Right -eyed.
  • Dextrocularity (deks - trok -u- Jar'- it - e) . The condition of being right -eyed.
  • Dextroform (deks'-tro-form). A combination of formaldehyd and dextrin, soluble in water and glycerol. It is used internally in suppu- rating cystitis and in the treatment of gonor- rhea in applications of 10 to 20% solu- tions.
  • Dextroglucose (deks-tro-glu 1 f -koz) . trose.
  • Dextrogyr (deks-tro-jir') (dextro-; turn around). A substance rotation to the right.
  • Dextrogyrate (deks-tro-ji f -rat). Same as Dextrorotatory.
  • Dextromanual (deks-tro-man' '-u-al) (dextro-; mantis, hand). Right-handed.
  • Dextromanuality (deks-tro-man-u-al'-it-e). The condition of being right-handed.
  • Dextropedal (deks-trop'-ed-al) (dextro-; pes, foot). Right-footed. See Dex- gyrare, to producing DEXTROPEDALITY 343 DIACETANILID Dextropedality (deks - tr'op - ed - aV - it - e). The condition of being right -footed.
  • Dextrophoria (deks-tro-o f -re-ah) (dextro-; 4> P°C, tending). A tending of the visual lines to the right. " , Dextrorotatory (deks-tro-ro' -tat-o-re) (dextro-; rotare, to whirl). Turning the rays of light to the right.
  • Dextrosaccharin (deks-tro-sak 1 '-ar-in) . A mix- ture of saccharin and glucose i : 2000.
  • Dextrose (deks'-tros) (dexter), C 6 H 12 6 . Grape- sugar; a sugar belonging to the glucose group, that rotates polarized light to the right. See Glucose.
  • Dextrosinistral (deks -tro -sin-is* '-tral) (dextro-; sinister, left). Extending from right to left.
  • Dextrosuria (deks-tro-su' -re-ah) (dextrose; oOpov, urine). The presence of dextrose in the urine. Cf. Levulosuria; Pentosuria.
  • Dextroversion (deks-tro-ver' '-zhun) (dextro-; verier e, to turn). Version to the right side.
  • Dhatureas (dah-tu'-re-as). Professional poison- ers of India who employ the Datura Jastuosa.
  • Dhooley (doo'-le). A covered stretcher used in India.
  • Dhurrin (dur'-in). A glucosid derived from glucose and occurring in young plants of Sorghum vulgar e (durra or Guinea corn).
  • Diabetico (di-ab-el'-ik-o). A beverage recom- mended in diabetes, said to consist of alcohol, 8.25%; extractive, 3.27%; glycerol, 0.82%; saccharin, 0.023%; sulfuric acid, 0.036%; tartaric acid, 0.56 % ; phosphoric acid, 0.025 %.
  • Diabetid (di-ab-e' -tid) (diabetes). A cutaneous manifestation of diabetes.
  • Diabetin (di-ab-e' -tin) (diabetes). Levulose.
  • Diabetogenic, Diabetogenous (di-ab-et-o- jen'-ik, di-ab-et-oj'-en-us) (diabetes; jzvvav, to produce). Causing diabetes.
  • Diabetograph (di-ab-et'-o-graf) (diabetes; ypa- fecv, to write). An instrument which registers the amount of glucose present in the urine which is dropped into it in boiling Fehling's solution.
  • Diabrotic (di-ab-rot'-ik) (dcafi poor woe; did., through; ftcfipcboKecv, to eat). 1. Corrosive. 2. A corrosive substance.
  • Diacaustic (di-ak-aws'-tik) (oca, through; kouotckoc, caustic). 1. A double convex cauterizing lens. 2. Exceedingly caustic.
  • Diacele (di'-as-el) (dca., between; kocXt), a hollow). The third ventricle of the brain.
  • Diacetanilid (di-as-et-an'-il-id), C 6 H 5 N(C 2 H 3 - 2 ) 2 . A compound of acetanilid and glacial DIACETIC ACID 344 DIAMID acetic acid closely resembling, but stronger in physiologic action than, acetanilid.
  • Diacetic Acid (di-as-e'-tik). See Acid, Dia- cetic.
  • Diacetonuria (di-as-et-on-u' -re-ah) . See Dia- ceturia.
  • Diaceturia (di-as-et-u' -re-ah) (di, two; acetum, vinegar; obpov, urine). The presence of diacetic acid in the urine.
  • Diachylon (di-ak' -il-on) (did, through; x u ^°C> juice). Lead-plaster. See Plumbi oxidum under Plumbum.
  • Diacid (di-as'-id) (di, two; acidus, acid). Having two atoms of hydrogen replaceable by a base.
  • Diaclasia, Diaclasis (di-ak-la' '-ze-ah, di-ak'-la- sis) (ocaitXaocg, a breaking in two), i. Refrac- tion. 2. A breaking.
  • Diaclast (di'-ak-last) (dcanXav, to break apart). An instrument for breaking up the fetal head.
  • Diacrisis (di-ak' '-ris-is) (dta, apart; np'cvecv, to separate or secrete). An affection with altered secretion.
  • Diactinic (di-ak-tin'-ik). Capable of trans- mitting actinic rays.
  • Diad (di'-ad) (di, two), i. Having a quantival- ence of two. 2. An element or radicle having a quantivalence of two. 3. A unit made up of primary units which are differentiated into parts, but yet constitute an individual; e. g., a morula.
  • Diagnose (di'-ag-nos). See Diagnosticate.
  • Diagnostic (di-ag-nos' -tik) (diagnosis). Serv- ing as evidence in diagnosis.
  • Diagnosticate, Diagnose (di-ag-nos' -tik-dt, di'-ag-nos) (diagnosis). To make a diagnosis.
  • Diagnostician (di-ag-nos-tish' -an) (diagnosis). One skilled in making diagnoses.
  • Diagnostics (di-ag-nos' '-tiks) (diagnosis). The science and art of diagnosis.
  • Diagnostitial (di-ag-nos-tish' -at). Procedure having a diagnostic purpose.
  • Diahydric (di-ah-hi' '-drik) (dta, through; udcop, water). Relating to transmission through water, as a percussion-note through a stratum of interposed fluid.
  • Dialysis (di-al'-is-is) (dca, through; Xbecv, to loose). The separation of several substances from one another in solution by taking ad- vantage of their differing diffusibility through porous membranes. Those that pass through readily are termed crystalloids, those that do not, colloids.
  • Dialytic (di-al-it'-ik) (dialysis). 1. Pertaining to or similar to the process of dialysis. 2. Producing relaxation (said of a remedy). 3. A condition of divergent change or evolution.
  • Dialyzable (di-al-i' -za-bl) . Capable of being separated by diffusion.
  • Dialyzed (di'-al-izd) (dialysis). Separated by dialysis. D. Raw Meat, a reddish fluid with a slightly acid or bitter taste, prepared from fresh beef or mutton to which are added 200 Gm. of water, 5 Gm. of hydrochloric acid, and 2 Gm. of pepsin; the whole is boiled at 38 C. for 5 or 6 hours.
  • Dialyzer (di' -al-i-zer) (dialysis). An apparatus for effecting dialysis; also the porous septum or diaphragm of such an apparatus.
  • Diamagnetic (di-ah-mag-net'4k) (dca, across; magnet). Taking a position at right angles to the lines of magnetic force.
  • Diametric (di-am-et'-rik). 1. Of, pertaining to, or coinciding with a diameter — extremely opposed. D. Pupil, one which constitutes a vertical slit, as is the case after two iridec- tomies, one upward and the other downward.
  • Diamid (di'-am-id) (di, two; amid). A double amid formed by replacing hydrogen in two ammonia molecules by an acid radicle. See Hydrazin. DIAMIN 345 DIARRHEA Diamin (di'-am-in) (di, two; atom). An amin formed by replacing hydrogen in two mole- cules of ammonia by a basic radicle. See Amin.
  • Diaminuria (di-am-in-u' -re-ah) (diamin; oupov, urine). The presence of diamin compounds in the urine.
  • Diapedesis (di-ah-ped-e' -sis) (dca, through; xrjddv, to leap). The passage of the blood through the unruptured vessel-walls.
  • Diaphane (di'-aj-dn) (oca, through; cfrahecv, to show), i. A transparent investing membrane of an organ or cell. 2. A small electric lamp used in transillumination.
  • Diaphanometer (di-af-an-om'-et-er). See Lac- toscope.
  • Diaphanoscope (di-aj-an' -o-skop) (dcaavrc, translucent; okotzs'cv, to inspect). An instru- ment for illuminating the interior of a body- cavity so as to render the boundaries of the cavity visible from the exterior.
  • Diaphanoscopy (di-af-an-os' -ko-pe) (see Dia- phanoscope). Examination of body-cavities by means of an introduced incandescent elec- tric light.
  • Diaphoresis (di-ah-jor-e'-sis) (did, through; op£~cv, to carry). Perspiration especially perceptible perspiration.
  • Diaphoretic (di-ah-for-ef '-ik) (diaphoresis). 1. Causing an increase of perspiration. 2. A medicine that induces diaphoresis.
  • Diaphragmatocele (di - ah -frag - mat' -o- set) (diaphragm; nrjXr), hernia). Hernia through the diaphragm.
  • Diaphtherin (di-af f -ther-in) (dcacfrdecpscv, to de- stroy). Oxyquinaseptol; a coal-tar deriva- tive composed of two molecules of oxyquinolin and one of aseptol. It is a yellow powder, with a phenol-like odor, and is used as an antiseptic in solutions varying in strength from 1 to 50 %.
  • Diaphtol (di-af'-tol), C ? H 7 4 SN. Orthooxyqui- nolin-metasulfonic acid. It is used in internal disinfection of the urinary tract in place of salol. Syn., Chinaseptol; Quinaseptol.
  • Diaphysis (di-a'-is-is) (dca, through; rj, distortion; p.kzpov, a measure). The measurement of deformities.
  • Diatela, Diatele (di-at-e'-lah, di'-at-el) (ded, between; tela, a web). The membranous roof of the diacele. . DIATERETIC 347 DICHROMATOPSIA Diateretic (di-ah-ter-ef '-ik) (dcarypelv, to watch closely). Of or pertaining to the practice of hygiene; diasostic.
  • Diathermal, Diathermanous (di-ath-er' -mal, di-ath-er' -man-us) (oca, through; dipp.1), heat). Permeable by waves of radiant heat.
  • Diathermometer (di-ah-ther-mom' -et-er) (dia; thermometer). An appliance for measuring the heat-conducting capacity of substances.
  • Diathesin (di-ath'-es-in), C 7 . H 8 . 2 . A sub- stitute for salicylic acid, the salicylates, and salicin; its use is indicated in gouty diatheses. Dose 75-15 gr. (0.5-1.0 Gm.).
  • Diaxon (di-aks'-on) (dis; a^cov, axis). 1. In biology, having two axes. 2. A neuron having two axons.
  • Diazonal (di-az' -o-nal) (dca, through; ^ojvt), a zone). Applied by Fiirbringer to nerve- trunks which lie across a sclerozone.
  • Dibasic (di-ba'-sik) (die, two; fiaotc, base). Of a salt, containing two atoms of a mono- basic element or radicle; of an acid, having two replaceable hydrogen atoms.
  • Dibenzyl (di-ben' -zil) , C U H U . A compound prepared by the action of sodium upon benzyl chlorid.
  • Dibenzylamin (di-ben-zil' -am-in) , C U H 15 N. An oily liquid having the constitution of am- monia in which two atoms of hydrogen are re- placed by two molecules of benzyl.
  • Diborated (di-bo'-ra-ted). Combined with two molecules of boric acid.
  • Dicalcic (di-kaV -sik) . Containing two atoms of calcium in each molecule. D. Ortho- phosphate, Ca 2 H 2 (P0 4 ) 2 , a salt occurring in urinary deposits.
  • Dicephalous (di-sef -al-us) (dicephalus). Two- headed.
  • Dicephalus (di-sef -al-us) (dec, two; Kecfrahr), a head). A monster with two heads.
  • Dichloracetic Acid (di-klor-as-e'-tik). See Acid, Dichloracetic.
  • Dichloralantipyrin (di-klo-ral-an-te-pi' -rin) . See Antipyrin Bichloral.
  • Dichlorethane (di-klor-eth'-dn). See Ethene Chlorid.
  • Dichlormethane (di-klor-meth'-an). See Methylene Dichlorid.
  • Dichotomy (di-kot' -o-me) (d'c%a, in two; xkp.vtcv, to cut). The state of being bifid; the phenom- enon of bifurcation. D., Anterior, said of a double monster united below the upper limbs. D., Posterior, said of a double monster in which the two individuals are fused above the posterior extremities.
  • Dichroism (di'-kro-izm). See Dichromism.
  • Dichromasy (di-kro'-mas-e) (die, two; xpi^iia, color). The condition of a dichromat; in- ability to distinguish more than two colors.
  • Dichromat (di'-kro-mat). A person with dichromatopsia. Cf. Monochromat; Trichro- mat.
  • Dichromic (di-kro' -mik) . i. Marked by two colors. 2. Containing two atoms of chro- mium.
  • Dichromism (di-kro' -miztn) (di-; xpcop-a, color). The state of presenting one color when seen by reflected light, and another when seen by transmitted light. See also Dichromatopsia.
  • Dichromophilism (di-kro-mo' -il-izm) (di-; Xpd)J.a, color; (f>ds7v, to love). Capability for double staining.
  • Dichromous, Dichroous, Dichrous (di'-kro- mus, di'-kro-us, di'-krus). Having two colors; relating to dichroism.
  • Dicinchonin (di-sin' -kon-in) (di-; cinchona), C 38 H 44 N 4 2 . An alkaloid of cinchona-bark.
  • Diclidostosis (di-klid-os-to'-sis) (dcK^ldsc, fold- ing doors; ooriov, a bone). Ossification of the venous valves. Syn., Osteodiclis.
  • Dicrotic (di-krot'-ik) (dt/cpozoc, double beating). Having a double beat. D. Pulse. See Di- crotism. D. Wave, the recoil-wave of the sphygmographic tracing, generated by closure of the aortic valves.
  • Dicrotism (di' - kro - tizm) (see Dicrotic). A condition of the pulse in which with every wave there is given to the finger of the ex- aminer the sensation of two beats. It is present when the arterial tension is low.
  • Didactic (di-dak' '-tik) (dcdaKxtnoc, apt at teaching). Teaching by description and theory.
  • Didelphic, Didelphous (di-del'-fik, -Jus) (dec, double; deX'JC, the uterus). Having a double uterus.
  • Diduction (di-duk' -shun) (diducere, to draw apart). Abduction of two parts; the with- drawal of a part.
  • Diductor (di-duk' -tor) (diduction). A muscle which in action produces diduction.
  • Didymin (did' -im-in) (d'c8u(xoc, the testes). A dry preparation made from the testes of the ox. Aphrodisiac dose 5 gr. (0.3 Gm.). In larger doses it is hypnotic.
  • Dielectric (di - el - ek' - trik) (dca, through; TJhKrpov, amber). Transmitting electricity by induction and not by conduction. D., Pseudo-, any compound which acts as a dielectric when pure, but as an electrolyte when mixed with other members of its own class.
  • Diencephalon (di-en-sef'-al-on) (dca, between; ij-icecfraAoc, brain). That part of the brain be- tween the prosencephalon and the mesencepha- lon. It includes the thalami and the third ven- tricle. Syn., Between-brain; Thalamence- phalon.
  • Dieresis (di-er' -es -is) (dcacpsocc, a division), A solution of continuity, as a wound, ulcera- tion, etc.
  • Dieretic (di-er -et'-ik) (dieresis). Destructive; escharotic; corrosive.
  • Diestrous, Dicestrous (di-es' -trus) . Pertaining to a type of sexual season in female animals in which there is a short period of sexual rest.
  • Diestrum, Dicestrum (di-es' -trum) (dca, be- tween; o'corpog, gad-fly). Heape's term for the short period of sexual rest characteristic of some female animals.
  • Dietary (di'-et-a-re) (diet). A system of food- regulation intended to meet the requirements of the animal economy.
  • Dietetic (di-et-et'-ik) (diei\. Pertaining to diet.
  • Diethylamin (di-eth-il'-am-in), NC 4 H n . A non- poisonous, liquid ptomain obtained from pu- trefying fish.
  • Dietotherapy (di-et-o-ther' -ap-e) (diet; Oepaneca, therapy). The regulation of diet for thera- peutic purposes.
  • Differentiation (dif -er-en-she-a' -shun) (see Dif- ferential), i. The act or process of distin- guishing or making different. 2. Changing from general to special characters; specializa- tion.
  • Difficulty in standing. Dystaxia (dis-taks' -e-ah) (dys-; xa^cc, regula- tion; order). Ataxia or partial ataxia. D.
  • Diffluence (dif f -lu-enz) (diffluere, to flow apart). The condition of being almost liquefied.
  • Diffusate (dif'-u-sat) (diffuse). The portion of the liquid which passes through the animal membrane in dialysis, and holds crystalloid matter in solution.
  • Diffuse (dif-us 1 ) (diffundere, to spread by pouring). Scattered; not limited to one tissue or spot; opposed to localized.
  • Diffusible (dif-u'-zib-l) (diffuse). Spreading rapidly; capable of passing through a porous membrane; applied to certain quickly acting stimulants, usually of transient effect.
  • Diffusion (dif-u'-zhun) (diffuse). A spread- ing -out. D. -circle, the imperfect image formed by incomplete focalization, the posi- tion of the true focus not having been reached by some of the rays of light or else having been passed.
  • Difluordiphenyl, Difluorodiphenyl (di-flu-or- di-fen'-il, -o-di-fen' -il) , C 6 H 4 F1 — C 6 H 4 F1; used as a 10% dusting-powder or as a 10% oint- ment in treating luetic ulcers, etc.
  • Digallic Acid (di-gaV-ik). Synonym of Tannic acid.
  • Digastric (di-gas' '-trik) (dec, two; yaaxrip, belly). Having two bellies, as the digastric muscle.
  • Digenesis (di-jen'-es-is) (dec, two; yheacc, generation). In biology, the alternation of sexual and asexual generation.
  • Digenetic (di-jen-et'-ik) (digenesis). Relating to alternate generation.
  • Digenism (di'-jen-izm). 1. See Digenesis. 2. The combined or concurrent action of two causes.
  • Digest (di-jest') (digerere, to digest). 1. To make food capable of ' absorption and assim- ilation. 2. In pharmacy, to macerate in a liquid medium. Digestant (di-jesf -ant) (digest). A substance that assists digestion of the food.
  • Digester (di-jesf -er) (digest). An autoclave or apparatus for destructive distillation.
  • Digestive (di-jes' -tiv) (digestion). 1. Relating to or favoring digestion. 2. An agent that pro- motes digestion. D. Tract, the whole ali- mentary canal from the mouth to the anus.
  • Digit (dif -it) (digitus, finger). A finger or toe.
  • Digitalacrin (dij-it-al-ak'-rin), C 25 H 46 6 . A substance obtained from digitalis.
  • Digitalein (dij-it-al'-e-in). 1. One of the con- stituents of digitalis. 2. A cardiac tonic and diuretic. Dose fa-^ g r - (0.001-0.002 Gm.) 2 to 4 times daily.
  • Digitaletin (dij-it-al-et'-in), C 22 H 38 9 . A sub- stance obtained from digitalin by heating with dilute acid.
  • Digitaliform (dif-it-aV -e-form) (digit; forma, form). Finger-shaped.
  • Digitaliretin, Digitalirrhetin (dij-it-al-i-ref- in), C 16 H 26 3 . A substance obtained from digitalin by action of dilute acid with heat.
  • Digitalism, Digitalismus (dij'-it-al-izm, dij- it-al-is'-mus). The condition caused by the injudicious use of digitalis, consisting in paral- ysis of cardiac action.
  • Digitalization (dij -it-al-i-za' -shun). Subjec- tion to the effects of digitalin or digitalis.
  • Digitation (dij -it-a r -shun) (digitatus, having digits). A finger-like process, or a succession of such processes, especially of a muscle.
  • Digiti mortui (dij'-it-i mor'-tu-i) (L.). Dead fingers; a cold and white state of the fingers.
  • Digitiform (dij'-it-e-form) (digit ; forma, form). Finger-shaped.
  • Digitin (dij'-it-in), (C 4 H 9 2 ) n . A therapeu- tically inert substance occurring as a granu- lar, crystalline powder, isolated from the leaves of Digitalis purpurea. Syn., Crystal- lized digitalin.
  • Digitofibular (dij-it-o-fib'-u-lar). Pertaining to the fibular aspect of the toes.
  • Digitometatarsal (dij-it-o-met-a-tar'-sal). Per- taining to the metatarsus and the toes.
  • Digitonin (dij-it-o' '-nin) (digitalis), C 31 H S2 O i7 . A white, amorphous mass obtained from digi- talis.
  • Digitoradial (dij-it-o-ra'-de-al). Relating to or situated upon the radial aspect of the fingers.
  • Digitotibial (dij-it-o-tib'-e-al). Relating to the tibial aspect of the toes.
  • Dihydrate (di-hi 1 '-drat) (die, twice; udojp, water). 1. Any compound containing two molecules of hydroxyl. Syn., Bihydrate. 2. A compound containing two molecules of water.
  • Dihydrated (di-hi' -dra-ted) . Having absorbed two hydroxyl molecules.
  • Dihydric (di-hi' -drik) . Containing two atoms of hydrogen in the molecule.
  • Dihydrid (di-hi' -drid) . A compound of two atoms of hydrogen with an element or radicle.
  • Dihydrocollidin (di-hi-dro-kol'-id-in), C 8 H 13 N. A liquid substance isomeric with a ptomain obtained from putrid flesh and fish.
  • Dihydrocoridin (di-hi-dro-kor'-id-in), C 10 H 17 N. A substance isomeric with a ptomain found in cultures of the Bacillus allii.
  • Dihydroresorcinol (di-hi - dro -re- zor'-sin - ol) . Shining white prisms, soluble in water, alcohol, or chloroform, melting at io4°-io6° C, obtained from resorcinol by action of sodium amalgam with carbon dioxid. It is recom- mended as an antiseptic.
  • Dihydroxytoluene (di-hi-droks-e-tol r -u-en) . See Orcin.
  • Diiodid (di-i'-o-did) (di, two; iodum, iodin). A compound consisting of a basic element and two atoms of iodin. D. Hy dro io date. See Caffein Triiodid.
  • Diiodoanilin (di-i-o-do-an' -il-in) , C 6 H 5 . NH 2 .I 2 (1:2:4). A reaction-product of anilin with iodin chlorid. It is antiseptic and used as an application in skin diseases. Syn., Metadiiodanilin.
  • Diiodomethane (di-i-o-do-meth'-dn). Methyl- ene iodid.
  • Diiodonaphthol (di-i-o -do-naf -thol) . See Diio- dobetanaphthol.
  • Diiodoresorcinol (di-i-o-do-re-zor'-sin-ol). A brown, inodorous powder, used as an antiseptic in place of aristol.
  • Diiodosalicylic Acid (di-i-o -do -sal-is -W -ik). See Acid, Diiodosalicylic. D.-methylester. SceSanoform. D.-phenylester. SeeDiiodo- salol.
  • Diiodosalol (di-i-o-do-saV f -ol) , C 6 H 2 I 2 (OH)C0 2 - C 6 H 5 . A condensation-product of diiodo- salicylic acid with phenol. It is used in treatment of skin diseases.
  • Diiodothioresorcinol (di-i-o -do- thi-o -re-zor' - sin-ol), C 6 H 2 2 I 2 S 2 . It is used as a dusting- powder and in 10 to 20% ointment.
  • Dilaceration (di-las-er-a' -shun) (dilaceratio, a tearing apart). A tearing apart; division of a membranous cataract by a tearing operation.
  • Dilatation (dil-at-a' -shun) . See Dilation.
  • Dilatator (di-lat-a' -tor) . See Dilator.
  • Dilate (di-lat') (dilare, to spread). To increase in size; to spread apart; to stretch.
  • Dilatometer (dil-at-om' -et-er) (dilation; ah pov, a measure). An apparatus for the estimation of the dilation of liquids.
  • Diluent (dil'-u-ent) (dilute). 1. Diluting. 2. An agent that dilutes the secretions of an organ.
  • Dilute (di-lut') (diluere, to wash away). To make weaker through increasing the bulk by the addition of liquid.
  • Dilution (di-lu' -shun) (dilute). 1. The process of adding a neutral fluid to some other fluid or substance, in order to diminish the qualities of the latter. 2. A diluted substance; the re- sult of a diluting process.
  • Dimethylamin (di-meth-il-am'-in), NC 2 H 7 . A nontoxic ptomain found in putrefying gelatin, old decomposing yeast, etc.
  • Dimethylated (di-meth'-il -a -led). Combined with two molecules of methyl.
  • Dimetria (di-me 1 '-tre-ah) (die, double; i>.i)Tpa, the womb). The condition of having a double uterus.
  • Dimorphobiotic (di - mor - fo - bi - of - ik) (dis; Hop4>T), shape; ficajotc, life). Relating to an organism which runs through two or more morphologically distinct phases in its life- history — a free stage and a parasitic stage.
  • Dimorphous (di-mor'-fus) (dis; p.opakT), the head). A monstrosity marked by the presence of two heads on one body.
  • Diplococcus (dip-lo-kok' '-us) (diplo-; k6kko£, sl berry). A micrococcus that occurs in groups of two.
  • Diplocoria (dip-lo-W -re -ah) (diplo-; Koprj, pupil). Double pupil.
  • Diploe (dip'-lo-e) (dcTzXo-q, a fold). The can- cellous bony tissue between the outer and inner tables of the skull.
  • Diploetic (dip-lo-et'-ik) (diploe). Relating to the diploe; diploic.
  • Diplogenesis (dip-lo-jen' -es-is) (diplo-; yhsacc, production). i. The development of a double or twin monstrosity. 2. The process described by Pigne in 1846 whereby con- genital tumors are formed by the inclusion of embryonic remains.
  • Diploic (dip-lo'-ik) (diploe). Pertaining to the diploe.
  • Diplomeric (dip-lorn' -er-ik) (diplo-; p.epoc, a part). Applied to muscles arising from two myotomes; e. g., the supraspinatus and infra- spinatus muscles.
  • Diplomyelia (dip-lo-mi-e' -le-ah) (diplo-; fwsXoc, marrow). An apparent doubleness of the spinal cord, produced by a longitudinal fissure.
  • Dipolar (di-po'-lar). See Bipolar.
  • Dipotassic (di-po-tas' -ik) (di, two; potassium). Containing two atoms of potassium in a molecule.
  • Dipterocarpus (dip-ter-o-kar'-pus) (dizrepoc, two-winged; tcap-6c, fruit). A genus of trees, chiefly found in southern Asia, some of which furnish gurjun balsam.
  • Dipterous (dip'-ter-us) (o/f, two; 7z~£pov, wing). In biology, having two wings or wing-like pro- cesses.
  • Director (di-rek'-tor) (direct). Anything that guides or directs. D., Grooved, an instrument grooved to guide the knife in surgical opera- tions.
  • Dirigomotor (dir-ig-o-mo' -tor) (dirigere, to di- rect; motor, a mover). Controlling motor action.
  • Disarticulation (dis -ar-tik-u-la' -shun) (dis-, articulum, a joint). Separation at a joint; amputation at a joint.
  • Disassimilation (dis-as-sim-il-a' -shun) (dis- assimilatio). The process of transformation of assimilated substances into waste-products.
  • Discharger (dis-char'-jer). An instrument for setting free electricity stored in a Leyden jar or other condenser.
  • Discharging (dis-char'-jing). Unloading; flow- ing out, as pus, etc. D. Lesion, a brain- lesion that causes sudden discharges of ner- vous motor impulses.
  • Disciform (dis'-e-Jorm). Disc -shaped.
  • Discission (dis-ish'-un) (discissio; discindere, to tear or cut apart). An operation for soft cataract in which the capsule is lacerated a number of times to allow the lens-substance to be absorbed.
  • Discoblastic (dis-ko-blas' '-tik) (disc; filaoxbc*, a germ). Undergoing discoid segmentation of the vitellus.
  • Discoid (dis'-koid) (disc). 1. Shaped like a disc. 2. An excavator having a blade in the form of a disc.
  • Discophorous (dis-kof'-or-us) (disc; (frkpetv, to bear). Furnished with a disciform organ or part.
  • Discoplasm, Discoplasma (dis r - ko - plazm, -plaz'-mah). The plasma of red blood-cor- puscles.
  • Discous (dis f -kus) (disc). Discoid.
  • Discrete (dis-kret') (discretus, separated). Not running together; separate.
  • Disdiaclast (dis-di 1 '-ak-last) (dec, double; dta, through; nXav, to break). One of the small, doubly refractive elements in the contractile discs of a muscle-fiber.
  • Disgregation (dis-greg-a'-shun) (disgregare, to separate). Dispersion; separation, as of molecules or cells.
  • Disinfectant (dis-in-fek'-tant) (dis, negative; inficere, to corrupt). An agent that destroys the germs of disease, fermentation, and putre- faction.
  • Disinfectin (dis-in-fek'-tin). A brown liquid obtained from treating 5 parts of the residue of naphtha -distillation with 1 part of con- centrated sulfuric acid and the resulting product with 5 parts of 10% soda solution. Diluted it is used as a disinfectant.
  • Disinfection (dis - in - fek' - shun) (see Dis- infectant). The destroying of disease- germs, especially by means of chemic substances.
  • Disintegrate (dis-in' '-te-grdt) (dis; integer, the whole). To break up or decompose.
  • Disintoxication (dis-in-toks-ik-a'-shun). See Detoxification.
  • Disodic (di-so'-dik or dis-od'-ik) (di, two; sodi- um), i. Containing two atoms of sodium in the molecule. 2.' (dec, twice; ddoc, a way.) Furnished with or relating to two openings.
  • Disoma, Disomus (di-so'-mah, -mus) (di-; oebfia, body; pi., disomata, disomi). A monster having two trunks.
  • Dispar (dis' -par) (L.). Unequal.
  • Disparate (dis'-par -at) (dispar). Not alike; unequal or unmated. D. Points, nonidentical points of the two retinas. Diplopia is pro- duced when the images of a single object fall upon such points.
  • Dispareunia (dis-par-oo'-ne-ah). See Dys- pareunia.
  • Dispensary (dis-pens'-ar-e) (dispensare, to dis- tribute). A charitable institution where med- ical treatment is given to the poor.
  • Dispensatory (dis-pens' -at-or-e) (dispensator- ium, an apothecary's diary). A treatise on materia medica and the composition, effects, and preparation of medicines.
  • Dispermin (di-sperm'-in). See Piper azin.
  • Dispermy (di-sperm'-e) (di-; ankpixa, a seed). The entrance of two spermatozoa into the ovum.
  • Dispersion (dis-per'-shun) (dispersus, scattered). The act of scattering. In physics, the separation of a ray of light into its component parts by reflection or refraction; also, any scattering of light, as that which has passed through ground glass.
  • Dispirem (dis-pi' -rem) (di-; spira, a spiral). The two skeins of a dividing nucleus formed from the nuclear loops and in develop- ment giving rise to the daughter-nuclei.
  • Dissect (dis-ekf) (dissecare, to cut up). To cut tissues apart carefully and slowly, in order to allow study of the relations of a part.
  • Dissection (dis-ek' '-shun) . The cutting apart of the tissues of the body for purposes of study. D. -wound, a septic wound acquired during dissection.
  • Disseminated (dis-em' -in-a-ted) (disseminare, to scatter seed). Scattered; spread over a large area. D. Sclerosis, a disease of the central nervous system in which the areas of sclerosis are irregularly scattered throughout the cord and brain. Syn., Multiple or Insular sclerosis.
  • Dissimilation (dis -im-il-a' -shun). See Kata- bolism.
  • Dissolution (dis-o-lu' -shun) (dissolutio; dis- solves, to set free). 1. The separation of a body or compound into its parts. 2. Death; decomposition.
  • Dissonance (dis'-o-nans) (dissonare, to dis- agree in sound). The combination of such tones as are so different from each other as to produce discord.
  • Distal (dis'-tal) (distare, to be at a distance). Extreme; at the greatest distance from a cen- tral point; peripheral.
  • Distichiasis (dis - tik-i' -as- is) (di-; ox't^oc, a row). The condition in which there is a double row of eyelashes, the inner rubbing against the globe. See also Entropion and Trichiasis.
  • Distillate (dis f -til-at) . The product obtained by distillation.
  • Distomatosis (di-sto-mat-o 1 -sis). See Disto- mia.
  • Distomia (di-sto r -me-ah) (see Distoma). Con- genital duplication of the mouth.
  • Distomiasis (dis-to-mi 1 '-as-is) (distoma). The presence in the body of distoma.
  • Distraction (dis -Irak' -shun) (distrahere, to draw apart). A method of treating certain joint diseases and bone-fractures by extension and counterextension.
  • Distribution (dis-tri-bu' -shun) (distribuere, to distribute). The branching of a nerve or artery, and the arrangement of its branches within those parts that it supplies.
  • Disulfate (di-sul'-fat) (di~; sulfur). A sulfate containing one atom of hydrogen that can be replaced by a base.
  • Disulfid (di-sul'-fid). A compound of an ele- ment or radicle with two atoms of sulfur.
  • Disvolution (dis-vo-lu' -shun) (dis; volvere, to roll down). Degeneracy; devolution; extreme katabolism.
  • Dita-bark (di> '-tali -bark) (L.). The bark of Alstonia scholar is, native to the Philippine Islands. It is employed as a tonic and anti- periodic in intermittent fever. Dose of the tincture 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc); of the fluidex- tract 2-5 min. (0.13-0.32 Cc); of the powder 5 gr. (0.32 Gm.).
  • Ditain (dit f -ah-in) , C 22 H 28 N 2 4 . An alkaloid from dita-bark, used hypodermatically in tetanus. Dose T \ gr. (0.005 Cm.) once or twice daily or until effectual. Syn., Echitamin.
  • Dithan (dith'-an). See Trional.
  • Dithion (dith'-e-on). A mixture of the two sodium dithiosalicylates occurring as a gray powder. It is used as an antiseptic wash (5 to 10 %) and dusting-powder in gonorrhea and in foot-and-mouth disease.
  • Dithymoldiiodid, Dithymoliodid (di-thi-mol- di-i'-o-did, di-thi-mol-i' -o-did) . Aristol.
  • Diureid (di-u* '-re-id). A compound containing two molecules of urea.
  • Diuresis (di-u-re' '-sis) (dca, through; oupslv, to urinate). Increase in the secretion of urine.
  • Diurnule (di-urn'-ul) (Fr.). A form of medicinal tablet or capsule that contains the maximum quantity of a toxic drug that may be ad- ministered in 24 hours.
  • Divergent (di-ver 1 '-jent) (divergere, to diverge). Moving in different directions from a common point. D. Strabismus. See Strabismus, Di- vergent.
  • Diverticular (di-ver -tik' -u-lar) (diverticulum). Relating to or arising from a diverticulum.
  • Diverticulitis (di-ver -tik-u-W '-tis). Inflamma- tion of a diverticulum of the urethra.
  • Divi-divi (div - e - div f - e) (S.A.). The seed- pods of Ccesalpinia coriaria, a tree of South America.
  • Divulsion (di-vid' -shun) (divulsio, a tearing apart). A tearing asunder.
  • Divulsor (di-vuV -sor) (L.). An instrument for dilating a part.
  • Dochmiasis (dok-mi' -as-is) (Dochmius). The diseased condition caused by the presence in the body of parasites belonging to the genus Dochmius. See Uncinariasis. Cf. A nkylostomiasis .
  • Dochmius (dok'-me-us) (doxfitoc, crumpled). A genus of threadworms of the family Strongylidce. D. duodenalis. See Anky- lo stoma.
  • Docimasia (dos - im - a' - se - ah) (doKt/xa^ecv, to examine). Examination; testing or assay- ing.
  • Docimasiology (dos-im-a-se-ol f -o-je) (docima- sia; X6foc, science). The art or science of investigation, embracing medicine, surgery, chemistry, etc.
  • Docimaster (dos-im-as'-ter). An examiner or tester.
  • Dodecadactylon (do-dek-a-dak' '-til-on) (dd)dei bile; cystos- tomy). The formation of a fistula between the duodenum and gall-bladder.
  • Duodenocholedochotomy (du-od-en-o-koled-o- kot'-o-me). A modification of choledochotomy consisting in incising the duodenum in order to reach the gall-duct.
  • Duodenocystostomy (du-od-en-o -sist-os 1 f -to-me) (duodeno-; cystostomy). The establishment of a communication between the bladder and the duodenum.
  • Duodenoenterostomy (du-od-en-o-en-ter-os'- to-me) (duodeno-; enterostomy). The for- mation of a fistula between the duodenum and small intestine.
  • Duodenogastric (du-od-en-o-gas'-trik). See Gastroduodenal.
  • Duodenostomy (du-od-en-o £cv, to write). An instrument designed to measure and record graphically muscular strength.
  • Dynamography (di-nam-og'-ra-fe) (see Dy- namograph). 1. Mechanics. 2. The meas- urement and graphic record of muscular strength.
  • Dynamometer (di-nam-om' -et-er) (dynamo; pkxpov, a measure). 1. An instrument for the measurement of muscular strength, particularly of the hand. 2. An instrument for estimating the magnifying power of lenses. Syn., Dynameter; Optical dynamom- eter.
  • Dyne (din) (duva/juc, power). A measure of force; it is the force that, when applied to a mass of one gram for one second, will give it a velocity of one centimeter a second.
  • Dysacousma (dis-ak-ooz'-mah) (dys-; aKouo'ca, hearing). A sensation of pain or discomfort caused by loud or even moderately loud noises.
  • Dysacusia, Dysacousis (dis-ak-oo' -ze-ah, -sis) (see Dysacousma). Difficulty of hearing.
  • Dysalbumose (dis-al'-bu-moz). A variety of albumose, insoluble in hot or cold water or hydrochloric acid.
  • Dysarthria (dis-ar' -thr e-ah) (dys-;apdpov, articu- lation). Impairment of articulation.
  • Dysarthrias (dis-ar -ihri' -tis) (dys-; arthritis). Anomalous gout.
  • Dysarthrosis (dis-ar -thro' -sis) (dys-; apdpov, a joint). A deformed joint.
  • Dysbasia (dis-ba' -ze-ah) (dys-; fiaocc, a step). Impairment of the power of walking. D. intermittens. See Claudication, Charcot's In- termittent.
  • Dysblennia (dis-blen' -e-ah) (dys-; (IXkvva, mucus). A disordered state or formation of the mucus.
  • Dyscatabrosis (dis-kat-ah-bro'-sis) (dys-; mra- Ppojocc, a devouring). ' Difficulty in swal- lowing food; dysphagia.
  • Dyschezia (dis-ke' -ze-ah) (dys-; xK £iV > t° go to - stool). Painful or difficult defecation, as in cases of prolapse of the ovary.
  • Dyscholia (dis-ko'-le-ah) (dys-; 70A77, bile). A disordered or morbid state of the bile.
  • Dyschondroplasia (dis-kon-dro-pla' -ze-ah) (dys-; jovdpoc, cartilage; nXaocc, molding). A disease of unknown etiology, attacking the long bones and the metacarpal and phalangeal skeleton of the hand. It is characterized by cartilaginous tissue developing regularly but ossifying very slowly.
  • Dyschrea, Dyschroia, Dyschroma (dis-kre'- ah, -kroi'-ah, -kro'-mah). See Dyschroa and Parachrea.
  • Dyschroa, Dyschroea (dis-kro'-ah, -kre'-ah) (dys-; XP°h> color). Discoloration, especially of the skin.
  • Dyschromasia (dis-kro-ma' -ze-ah). i. See Dyschroa. 2. See Dyschromatopsia.
  • Dyschromatope (dis-kro' '-mat-op) (dys-; xpup.a, color; otytg, vision). An individual affected with dyschromatopsia.
  • Dyschromatopsia (dis-kro-mat-op'-se-ah) (see Dyschromatope). Partial color-blindness.
  • Dyscoria (dis-ko'-re-ah) (dys-; nopr), pupil). Ab- normity of the form of the pupil.
  • Dyscrasia (dis-kra' -ze-ah) (dys-; update, com- bination). A depraved condition of the blood or system due to general disease.
  • Dysemesia, Dysemesis (dis-em-e' -ze-ah. -sis) (dys-; erne sis). Painful vomiting; retching. Dysemia (dis-e'-me-ah) (dys-; alfia, blood). A morbid state of the blood.
  • Dysenteric (dis-en-ter'-ik) (dysentery). Of the nature of or affected with dysentery.
  • Dysenteriform (dis-en-ter'-e-form) (dysentery; forma, form). Resembling dysentery.
  • Dyserethisia (dis-er-e-thiz' -e-ah) (dys-; ipe- d'tt^ztv, to excite). Diminished sensibility or irritability.
  • Dysergasia, Dysergasy (dis-er-ga' -ze-ah, dis- er-ga'-ze) (ouasp-rrjc, difficult to effect). Dis- turbances of function, especially as manifested in neurasthenia.
  • Dysesthesia (dis-es-ihe' -ze-ah) (dys-; a'cad-qocc, sensation). 1. Dulness of sensation. 2. Painfulness . of any sensation not normally painful.
  • Dysesthesia (dis-es-ihe' -ze-ah). See Dyses- thesia.
  • Dysgenesia (dis-jen-e' -ze-ah) (dys-; yevvav, to produce). Loss or impairment of procreative power.
  • Dysgeusia (dis-ju' -se-ah) (dys-; yeuocc, taste). Morbidity or perversion of the sense of taste.
  • Dysgraphia (dis-graf'-e-ah) (dys-; ypafatv, to write). Impairment of the power of writing as a result of a brain-lesion.
  • Dyshidria, Dysidria (dis-hid'-re-ah, dis-id'- re-ah) (dys-; v copd>g, sweat). A morbid con- dition of the function of perspiration.
  • Dysidrosis (dis-id-ro'-sis) (dys-; "cdpcoocg, sweat- ing). Synonym of Pompholyx.
  • Dyskatabrosis (dis-kat-ah-bro'-sis). See Dys- catabrosis.
  • Dyskinesia (dis-kin-e' -ze-ah) (dys-; Klvqatc, movement). Impairment of the power of voluntary motion.
  • Dyslalia (dis-la'-le-ah) (dys-; lahlv, to talk). Impairment of the power of speaking, due to a defect of the organs of speech.
  • Dyslexia (dis-leks'-e-ah) (dys-; Xk$cg, reading). Impairment of the ability to read.
  • Dyslogia (dis-lo'-je-ah) (dys-; Xoyoc, speech). Difficulty in the expression of ideas by speech.
  • Dyslysin (dis' -lis-in) (dys-; XUcv, to dissolve), C^HggOy . A product of cholic acid.
  • Dysmimia (dis-mim' -e-ah) (dys-; pLtfie'cadac, to mimic). Impairment of the power to use signs and gestures.
  • Dysmorphophobia (dis-mor-o-o f -be-ah) (dys-; fiop7), form; 4>°fi°C> fear). Morbid dread of deformity; it is a rudimentary form of paranoia.
  • Dysmorphosteopalinklast (dis-morf-os-te-o- pal'-in-klast). An instrument for refracturing a bone which has united with deformity.
  • Dysmorphosteopalinklasy (dis-morf-os-te-o- pal-in' -kla-se) (oua/xopc^oc, deformed; dozeov, a bone; nakcv, again; ukav, to break). The operation of refracturing a bone which has healed with deformity after a fracture.
  • Dysneuria (dis-nu'-re-ah) (dys-; vzCpov, nerve). An impairment of nerve-function.
  • Dysodontiasis (dis-o-don-ti' -as-is) (dys-; ddov- zcaacc, dentition). Difficult dentition.
  • Dysopia (dis-o'-pe-ah) (dys-; axp, eye). Painful or defective vision.
  • Dysorexia (dis-or-eks'-e-ah) (dys-; 5pe£ef, appetite). A depraved or unnatural appetite.
  • Dysosmia (dis-oz' '-me-ah) (dys-; daprj, odor). Impairment of the sense of smell.
  • Dyspareunia (dis-par-oo'-ne-ah) (duonapwvog, ill-mated). Painful or difficult copulation. D., Climacteric, pain or difficulty in coitus following the menopause; it is regarded as a symptom of kraurosis vulvae.
  • Dyspeptic (dis-pep'-tik) (see Dyspepsia), i. Relating to or affected with dyspepsia. 2. A person suffering from dyspepsia.
  • Dyspeptone (dis-pep'-ton) (see Dyspepsia). An insoluble and unassimilable peptone.
  • Dysperistalsis (dis-per-e-stal 1 -sis) (dys-; xep'c, around; ozaXocg, compression). Painful or perverted peristalsis.
  • Dysphasia (dis-fa'-ze-ah) (dys-; 4>aocc, speech). Difficulty of speech depending on a central lesion.
  • Dysphemia (dis-fe' '-me-ah) (dys-; WT), a speech). Stammering.
  • Dysphonia (dis-jo' -ne-ah) (dys-; fjxovty voice). An impairment of the voice.
  • Dysphrasia (dis-fra'-ze-ah) (dys-; §paoi£, speech). Imperfect speech due to impairment of mental power.
  • Dysplasmatic, Dysplastic (dis-plaz-mat'-ik, dis-plast' -ik) . See Cacoplastic.
  • Dyspnea (disp-ne'-ah) (dys-; -velv, to breathe). Difficult or labored breathing. D., Cardiac, that due to heart disease. D., Renal, that DYSPNEIC 366 EARTH Traube's. See due to renal disease.
  • Dystocia (dis-to' se-ah) (dys-; xokoc, birth). Difficult labor. D., Fetal, difficult labor due to abnormities of position or size and shape of the fetus. D., Maternal, that dystocia the cause of which resides in the mother.
  • Dystrophic (dis-tro' -fik) (see Dystrophy). Per- taining to dystrophy.
  • Dystrophy (dis' -tro-fe) (dys-; xpomodac, to grow).
  • Ecrasement (a-krahz-mon (g) ) (F., "a, crush- ing"). The removal of a part by means of an „ ecraseur.
  • Ecsomatic (ek-so-mat'-ik) (it<, out; odjfia, body). Relating to ecsomatics or to material removed from the body, as pus, urine, etc.
  • Ecsomatics (ek-so-maf -iks) . That department of medicine included in clinical laboratory methods; so called because all the material dealt with is removed from the body and examined elsewhere.
  • Ecsomatist (ek-so' -mat-ist) . An individual who is versed in clinical laboratory methods.
  • Ecstasis (ek-sta' -sis) . See Ecstasy.
  • Ecstasy (eks'-ta-se) (eKoxaacg, a trance). A derangement of the nervous system charac- terized by an exalted visionary state, absence of volition, insensibility to surroundings, a radiant expression, and immobility in statu- esque positions.
  • Ecstrophy (ek'-stro-fe). See Exstrophy.
  • Ectacolia, Ectacoly (ek-ta-ko'-le-ah, ek'-ta- ko-le) (eKxaKog, capable of stretching; noXov, the colon). Congenital dilation of a more or less extensive section of the colon.
  • Ectad (ek'-tad) (enroc, external; ad, to). On or toward the ectal part.
  • Ectal (ek'-tal) (see Ectad). At some surface or aspect farther from a supposed center than that with which a given object is com- pared; external; superficial.
  • Ectasia, Ectasis (ek-ta' -ze-ah, ek'-ta-sis) (enza- o(C, extension). Distention; dilation.
  • Ectasin (ek'-ta-sin) (see Ectasia). A substance isolated from tuberculin, which causes dila- tion of the vessels.
  • Ectatic (ek-tat'-ik) (see Ectasia). Distended or dilated.
  • Ecthol (ek'-thol). A proprietary remedy said to contain the active principles of Echinacea angustifolia and Thuja occidentalis ; it is anti- purulent and antimorbific. Dose i dr. (4 Gm.) 3 times daily.
  • Ecto trochanter (ek-to-lro-kan' '-ter) (ecto-; tro- chanter). The greater trochanter.
  • Ecto- (ek-to-) (iKzoc, without). A prefix signi- fying without, upon the outer side. < Ectoblast (ek' -to -blast) (ecto-; plaoxoc, a bud). The outside membrane'of a cell.
  • Ectocentral (ek-to-sen'-tral) (ecto-; central). Near to the center and to the external surface.
  • Ectochoroidea (ek-to-rko-roid' '-e-ah) . The outer layer of the choroid.
  • Ectocnemial (ek-to-ne' -me-al) (ecto-; kvtjjju), the leg). Located on the external aspect of the fibula.
  • Ectocolostomy (ek-to-ko-los'-to-me) (ecto-; colostomy). A surgical operation upon the colon to establish an external opening.
  • Ectoderm (ek' '-to -derm) (ecto-; depfia, skin). The outer of the two primitive layers of the embryo.
  • Ectodermal, Ectodermic (ek-to-der' -mal, -mik) (see Ectoderm). Relating to the ecto- derm; applied to structures derived from the upper epithelial layers of the derma, as hair, chitin, enamel, etc.
  • Ectogenous (ek-toj' -en-us) (ecto-; yevvav, to produce). Capable of growth outside of the body; applied especially to bacteria and other parasites.
  • Ectoglobular (ek-to-glob'-u-lar). Formed out- side the blood-globules.
  • Ectokelostomy (ek-lo-kel-os' '-to -me) (ecto-; ktjXtj, hernia; orbfia, a mouth). Vitrac's operation, by which the sac of an infected inguinal hernia is kept open with drainage, the whole being displaced through a coun- teropening in the abdominal wall, the hernia being then cured radically.
  • Ectopagus (ek-top'-ag-us) (ecto-; naye.cc, united). A twin monstrosity united laterally the full extent of the thorax.
  • Ectopectoral (ek-to-pek'-tor-al). The outer of the two pectoral muscles; the pectoralis major.
  • Ectoperitonitis (ek-lo-per-it-on-i'-tis) (ecto-; peritonitis). Inflammation of the attached side of the peritoneum.
  • Ectopia (ek-to' -pe-ah) (Iktotzoc, displaced). Malposition.
  • Ectopic (ek-top'-ik) (ectopia). In an abnormal position. E. Gestation, extrauterine gesta- tion.
  • Ectoplasm (ek f -to-plazm) (ecto-; TiXdoattv, to form). The outer, hyaline, more compact layer of protoplasm of a cell or unicellular organism.
  • Ectoplastic (ek-to-plas'-tik). Relating to ecto- plasm; applied to cells in which the ectoplasm is undergoing changes.
  • Ectopocystis (ek-to-po-sist'-is) (ectopia; kuo- tcc, the bladder). Displacement of the blad- der.
  • Ectopotomy (ek-to -p of -o -me) (ectopia; r e fi- ve cv, to cut). Laparotomy for the removal of the contents of an extrauterine gestation- sac.
  • Ectorbital (ekt-orb 1 '-it-al) . Relating to the temporal part of the orbits.
  • Ectosac (ek'-to-sak) (ecto-; ookkoc, a sac). The limiting membrane of an ovum.
  • Ectosteomyces (ekt-os-te-o-mi 1 '-sez) (ecto-; 60- zeov, a bone; fi'JKTjc, a fungus). A fungous newgrowth from a bone.
  • Ectothalamus (ek-to -thai' -am-us) (ecto-; thala- mus). The external medullary layer of the thalamus.
  • Ectothrix (ek'-to-thriks) (ecto-; dpi£, hair). An organism parasitic upon the hair. Cf. Tricho- phyton.
  • Ectromelus (ek-trom' -el-us) (eiapcootc, abortion; fieXoc. a limb). A single autositic monster characterized by the presence' of imperfectly formed limbs.
  • Ectropia (ek-tro 1 '-pe-ah). See Exstrophy. E., Intestinal. See Adenoma, Umbilical.
  • Ectropic (ek-trop'-ik). Turned out or everted.
  • Ectropion (ek-tro' -pe-on) (en, out; xpkizetv, to turn). Eversion of a part, especially of an eyelid. Ectropion.
  • Ectropionization (ek-tro-pe-on-iz-a'-shun). In- version of the upper eyelid and exposure of the conjunctiva to facilitate therapeutic man- ipulation.
  • Ectropionize (ek - tro '- pe-on - Iz) (ectropion). To produce, by operation, the condition of ectropion.
  • Ectropodism (ek-trop' -od-izm) (eKxpcofia, abor- tion; tzouc, foot). Congenital absence of one or more toes.
  • Eddyism (ed'-e-izm). A form of faith-cure propagated, under the name of Christian Science, by an American woman, Mary Patterson Baker Glover Eddy, known to her followers as "Mother Eddy." Edea, JEdada. (e-de'-ah) (acdola, the genitals). The genital organs.
  • Edeitis, iEdoeitis (e-de-i' -tis) (edea; crcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the genitals.
  • Emarisio (e-man'-she-o) (L.). A failing. E. mensium, delay in the first appearance of ■the menses.
  • Emballometer (em-bal-om' -et-er) (k^aXXecv, to throw; p.hpov, a measure). A percussion instrument employed in connection with a stethoscope.
  • Embed (em-bed'). In histology, to treat a tissue with some substance, as paraffin or celloidin, which shall give it support during the process of section-cutting.
  • Embedding (em-bed' -in g) (embed). The fixation of a tissue-specimen in a firm medium, in order to keep it intact during the cutting of thin sections.
  • Embolalia (em-bo-la' -le-ah) . See Embololalia.
  • Embole (em'-bo-le). See Emboly. Embolic (em-bol'-ik) (embolus). Relating to or caused by an embolus.
  • Emboliform (em-boV -if-orm) (embolus). Re- sembling an embolus.
  • Embololalia (em -bo -lo -la' -le-ah) (embolus; XaXca, babble). The intercalation of meaning- less words into the speech.
  • Embolus (em'-bo-lus) (iv, in; ftaXXecv, to throw; pi., emboli). A particle of fibrin or other mate- rial brought by the blood-current and form- ing an obstruction at its place of lodgment.
  • Emboly (em'-bo-le) (ififtoXrj, insertion). The process of invagination that gives rise to a gastrula from a blastosphere or vesicular morula.
  • Embrocation (em-bro-ka' -shun) (ififtpkxetv, to soak in). 1. The application, especially by rubbing, of a liquid to a part of the body. 2. The liquid so applied.
  • Embryo cardia (em-bri-o-kar'-de-ah) (embryo; napo'ca, the heart). A condition in which the heart-sounds resemble those of the fetus, the first and second sounds being almost identical.
  • Embryo chemic (em-bri-o-kem'-ik) (embryo; %rjp.eca, chemistry). Relating to the changes in the chemic distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in the fertilized egg during devel- opment.
  • Embryo ctonic, Embryoctonous (em-bri-ok- ton'-ik, -ok'-ton-us) (embryo; nze'ivecv, to kill). Abortif acient ; relating to embryoctony.
  • Embryo ctony (em-bri-ok' -to-ne) (see Embryoc- tonic). The destruction of the living fetus; the procurement of abortion.
  • Embryo (em'-bre-o) (iv, in; ^puscv, to swell with). 1. The product of conception up to the fourth month of pregnancy. 2. The fer- tilized germ of an animal.
  • Embryogenetic (em-bri-o-jen-ef -ik) (embryo; yevijg, producing)/ Giving rise to an embryo.
  • Embryogeny (em-bri-oj'-en-e) (see Embryo- genetic). That department of biology which deals with the development of the fecundated germ.
  • Embryolemma (em-bri-o-lem'-ah) (embryo; Xi/ifia, a husk). The special fetal membranes, the amnion, serolemma, etc.
  • Embryology (em-bri-ol'-o-je) (embryo; Xoyoc, science). The science dealing with the devel- opment of the embryo.
  • Embryometrotrophia (em-bri-o-met-ro-tro'-fe- ah) (embryo; firjrpa, the womb; rpifecv, to nourish). The nourishment of the embryo.
  • Embryonate (em'-bri-o-nal) (embryo), 1. Re- lating to an embryo. 2. Fecundated; contain- ing an embryo.
  • Embryonic (em-bri-on'-ik) (embryo). Pertain- ing to the embryo. E. Area, an opaque circu- lar spot that forms on the blastoderm. E. Spot. See E. Area. E. Tissue, tissue in the undifferentiated state, consisting of small, round cells.
  • Embryoplastic (em-bri-o-plas'-tik) (embryo; ■jtXaooecv, to form). Participating in the formation of the embryo; it is said of cells.
  • Embryoscope (em'-bri-o-skop) (embryo; okotzzIv, to examine). An appliance by means of which the course of development of the embryo in eggs with shells may be ob- served.
  • Embryospastic (em-bri-o-spas'-tik) (embryo; OTtav, to draw). Relating to fetal extraction with an instrument.
  • Embryotome (em' -bri-o-tom) (embryo; to/ztj, section). An instrument for performing em- bryotomy.
  • Embryotomy (em-bri-of -o-me) (see Embryo- tome). The cutting up of the fetus in the uterus for the purpose of reducing its size. Emesis (em'-es-is) (i/xkiv, to vomit). Vom- iting.
  • Emetic (e-met'-ik) (see Ernests). 1. Having the power to induce vomiting. 2. An agent caus- ing emesis. E., Direct, E., Mechanic, one acting directly on the nerves of the stomach. E., Indirect, E., Systemic, one acting through the blood upon the vomiting center.
  • Emetin (em'-et-in). 1. See Ipecacuanha. 2. A resinoid from ipecac-root; it is emetic, diaphoretic, and expectorant. Emetic dose \~\ g r - (0.008-0.016 Gm.); expectorant, lo-p g r - (0.001-0.002 Gm.).
  • Emetism (em'-et-izm) (see Emesis). Poison- ing from undue use of ipecac, manifested by acute inflammation of the pylorus, at- tended with hyperemesis and diarrhea and in some instances with paroxysms of coughing and asthmatic suffocation.
  • Emetized (em' -et-izd) . 1. Prepared with tartar emetic. 2. Nauseated.
  • Emetocathartic (em-et-o-kath-ar'-tik) (emesis; cathartic). Having power to induce vomiting and purgation.
  • Emissary (em'-is-a-re) (emittere, to send forth). i. An outlet. 2. Furnishing an outlet. E. Veins, small veins piercing the skull and conveying blood outward.
  • Emmetropia (em-et-ro'-pe-ah) (iv, in; pterpov, a measure; axp, the eye). Normal or perfect vision. The state of an eye in which, when accommodation is suspended, parallel rays of light are brought to a focus upon the retina.
  • Emmetropic (em-et-rop'-ik) (see Emmetropia). Characterized by emmetropia..
  • Emol (e'-mol) (emollire, to soften). A fine powder composed of talc, silica, alumin- ium, and a trace of lime, miscible with water, and used as paste in the treatment of various forms of hyperkeratosis.
  • Emollient (e-mol'-yent) (see Emol). 1. Soften- ing; relaxing; soothing. 2. A substance used by external application to soften the skin; or, internally, to soothe an irritated or inflamed surface.
  • Emotional (e-mo'-shun-al) (emovere, to move out). Pertaining to the emotions. E. In- sanity, insanity characterized by exaggera- tion of the emotions or feelings.
  • Emphysatherapy (em - fiz - ah - ther' - ap - e) (ifufiuoav, to inflate; therapy). The therapeu- tic injection of gas into a body -cavity.
  • Empiric (em-pir'-ik) (kjxnetpcKoc, experienced). 1. Based on practical observation and not on scientific reasoning. 2. One who in practising medicine relies solely on experience and hot on scientific reasoning; a quacks Empis' "Granulie." Acute miliary tubercu- losis of the lungs.
  • Emplastic (em-plas' '-tik) \ep.7z\aoTCKbc, clogging). 1. Suitable for a plaster. 2. A constipating medicine.
  • Emplastration (em-plas -tra! -shun) (emplas- trum). The act of applying a plaster.
  • Emplastrum (em-plas' -trum) (L.). A plaster (q. v.).
  • Empodistic (em-pod-is' -tik) (i/modt^ecv, to hinder). 1. Checking; preventing. 2. A preventive remedy.
  • Emprosthotonos (em-pros-thot'-o-nos) \e/i- npoodev, forward; zovog, tension). Tonic mus- cular spasm in which the body is bent forward.
  • Emprosthozygosis (em - pros - tho - zi - go'- sis) (epxpooOev, forward; ^uyouv, to join). The condition of conjoined twins in which the fusion is anterior.
  • Empusa (em-poo' -zah) \lp.nouaa, a hobgoblin), A genus of fungi parasitic on living insects and causing their death.
  • Empyema (em-pi-e'-mah) (iv, in; nbov, pus). Pus in a cavity, especially in the pleural cavity. E. necessitatis, an empyema in which the pus burrows between the inter- costal spaces and appears as a subcutaneous tumor. E., Pulsating, one that transmits the pulsations of the heart to the chest-wall.
  • Empyreuma (em-pi-ru'-mah) (ep-TiOpeufia, a heating; a burnt flavor). The odor developed in organic matter by destructive distillation.
  • Emulsify (e-mul'-se-fi) (see Emulsion). To make into an emulsion.
  • Emulsin (e-mul'-sin) (see Emulsion), A pro- teid ferment contained in bitter almonds. It aids in emulsifying almond oil, and, by its action on amygdalin, liberates hydrocyanic acid.
  • Emulsion (e-muV -shun) (emulsum, an emul- sion), A preparation consisting of a liquid, usually water, containing an insoluble sub- stance in suspension.
  • Emunctory (e - munk' - tor - e) (emungere, to blow the nose; to wipe out), i. Excretory; removing waste-products. 2. An organ that excretes waste-materials.
  • Emundans, Emundant (e-mun'-danz, -dant) (emundare, to clean out). Cleansing and disinfectant; applied to certain washes.
  • Emundantia, Emundants (e-mun-dan' -she-ah, e-mun' -dants) (see Emundans). Detergents.
  • Emundation (e-mun-da' -shun) (see Emundans), The rectification of drugs.
  • Emusculate (e-mus' '-ku-lat) (e, out; musculus, a muscle). Without muscles.
  • Enadelphia (en-ah-deV -fe-ah) . See Inclusion, Fetal.
  • Enantesis (en-an-te' -sis) (ivavrioc, opposite). The approximation of ascending and descend- ing blood-vessels.
  • Enanthem (en-an' -them) (iv, in; avdy/jia, bloom). An eruption on an internal mucous membrane.
  • Enanthotoxin, (Enanthotoxin (e-nan-tho- toks'-in), C l7 H 22 5 . A poisonous resinoid contained in (Enanihe crocata. It acts as does picrotoxin in producing violent convul- sions.
  • Enanthrope (en-an' -thr op) (iv, in; avdpcoxoc, man). A source of disease originating in- ternally.
  • Enantiobiosis (en-an-ti-o-bi-o' -sis) (ivavrhc, opposite; (Hoc, life). Commensalism in which the associated organisms are an- tagonistic to each other's development.
  • Enantiopathic (en-an-te-op' -ath-ik) . 1. Pal- liative. 2. Pertaining to enantiopathy.
  • Enantiopathy (en-an-te-op' -ath-e) (ivavrhc, opposite; nadoc, disease). A disease antag- onistic to another disease.
  • Enarkyo chrome (en-ar' -ke-o-krom) (iv, in; apKUC, a net; ;^od) ( ua, color). Nissl's term for a nerve-cell taking the stain best in the cell- body, the formed part of which is arranged in the shape of a network.
  • Enarthrodial (en -ar- thro' -de -at) (enarthro- sis). Having the character of an enar- throsis.
  • Enarthrosis (en-ar -thro' '-sis) (iv, in; apdpov, a joint). A ball-and-socket joint, like that of the hip.
  • Enarthrum (en-ar' -thrum) (see Enarthrosis). A foreign body lodged in a joint.
  • Encanthis (en-kan' -this) (iv, in; kovQoc, canthus). A newgrowth in the inner canthus of the eye. Encapsulation (en-kap-su-la' -shun) (iv, in; capsula, a capsule). The process of sur- rounding a part with a capsule.
  • Encelitis, Enccelitis (en-se-W -Us) (iv, in; KocX'ca, belly; czcc, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the abdominal viscera.
  • Encephalalgia (en-sef-al-al'-je-ah) (encephalon; alyoc, pain). Pain in the head. E. hydro- pica, hydrocephalus.
  • Encephalanalosis (en - sef -al-an-al - 0'- sis) (encephalon; avaXujoic, a wasting away). Cerebral atrophy.
  • Encephalasthenia (en - sef -al-as- the'- ne -ah) (encephalon; asthenia). Althaus' term for the cerebral form of neurasthenia.
  • Encephalauxe (en-sef-al-awks' -e) (encephalon; au$7), increase). Hypertrophy of the brain.' Encephaledema (en - sef - al - e - de' - mah) (encephalon; edema). Edema of the brain.
  • Encephalelcosis (en-sef -al- el- ko' -sis) (en- cephalon; helcosis). Ulceration of the brain.
  • Encephalemia (en-sef-al-e' -me-ah) . See Enceph- alohemia.
  • Encephalic (en-sef-al' -ik) (encephalon). Per- taining to the brain.
  • Encephalitis (en-sef-al-i' -tis) (encephalon; txtc, inflammation). Inflammation of the brain. E. neonatorum (Virchow), localized soft- ening consisting of numerous yellow spots sur- rounded by hemorrhage; these occur most commonly in the brains of syphilitic infants.
  • Encephalo scopy (en-sef -al-os'-ko-pe) (encepha- lo-; o/conelv, to examine). Examination of the brain.
  • Encephalo- (en-sef-al-o-) (encephalon). A prefix meaning relating to the encephalon or brain.
  • Encephalocele (en-sef -al-o-sel) (encephalo-; ktjXt), hernia). Hernia of the brain. Encephalocele.— (Moullin.) Encephalodialysis (en -se-al-o-di- al'-is - is) (encephalo-; oca, through; Xbecv, to loose). Softening of the brain.
  • Encephalohemia (en-sef-al-o-he' -me-ah) (en- cephalo-; alfia, blood). Congestion of the brain.
  • Encephaloid (en-sef -al-oid) (encephalo-; elooc, like), 1. Resembling brain tissue. 2. Soft carcinoma. See Carcinoma, Encephaloid.
  • Encephaloma (en-sef-al-o' -mah) (encephalo-; op.a, tumor). A tumor of the brain.
  • Encephalomalacia (en-sef -al-o-mal-a' -she-ah) (encephalo-; (xaXan'ca, softening). Softening of the brain-substance.
  • Encephalomyelitis (en - sef - al-o-mi-el-i' -tis) . Encephalitis combined with myelitis.
  • Encephalon (en-sef -al-on) (ifKecfraXoc, brain). The brain.
  • Encephalopathy (en-sef -al-op' -ath-e) (encepha- lo-; izadoc, disease). Any disease of the brain.
  • Encephalopyosis (en-sef -al-o-pi-o' -sis) (enceph- alo-; pyosis). Abscess of the brain.
  • Encephalosepsis (en-sef-al-o-sep f -sis) (en- - cephalo-; ofjtfxc, decay). Gangrene of the tissue of the brain.
  • Encephalosis (en-sef -al-o' -sis). The formation of an encephaloma.
  • Encephalospinal (en - sef - al - o - spi' - nal) (encephalo-; spina, the spine). Pertaining to the brain and spinal cord.
  • Encephalothlipsis (en - sef - al - o - thlip' - sis) (encephalo-; dXecJiec, pressure). Pressure on the brain.
  • Enchondral (en-kon'-dral). See Endochondral.
  • Enchondroma (en-kon-dro'-mali) (iv, in; Xovdpoc, cartilage; bpta, tumor). A chon- droma.
  • Enchondrosarcoma (en-kon-dro-sar-ko f -mah) . Sarcoma containing cartilaginous tissue.
  • Enchylema (en-ki-le' -mah) (iv, in; %v%bc, juice). A fluid, granular substance filling the interstices of the cell-body and the nucleus.
  • Enchyma (en'-ke-mah) (ijxtev, to pour in). An organic juice elaborated from chyme, the formative juice of tissues.
  • Encolpism, Encolpismus (en-hoV '-pizm, en- kol-piz' -mus) (iv, in; K.6Xizo£, the vagina), i. A vaginal suppository. 2. Medication by vaginal suppositories.
  • Encyesis (en-si-e' -sis) (iyKUfjoec). Pregnancy.
  • Encysted (en-sisf -ed) (kv, in; nuaxec, a cyst). Inclosed in a cyst or capsule.
  • Endangium (end-an' -je-um) (endo-; ayytlov, The intima or inmost coat of a blood- a-or-ti'-tis) (endo-; aorta; exec, Inflammation of the intima vessel).
  • Endarterial (end-ar-te' -re-al) . Within an artery.
  • Endarteritis (end-ar-ter-i'-.is) (endo-; dpxrjpea, artery; exec, inflammation). Inflammation of the inner coat of an artery. E., Oblit- erating, arteritis obliterans, a form in which the production of new connective tissue oblit- erates the vessel-lumen.
  • Endaxoneuron (en-daks-o-nu'-ron) (endo-; axo- neuron). A neuron whose nerve-process does not leave the spinal cord; the endaxoneurons include the column cells and the internal cells.
  • Endectoplastic (end -ek-to- plas f - tik) (endo-; kicxoc, outward; nXaaaeev, to form). Applied to cells which form tissue by a metamorphosis of the protoplasm at both the periphery and the center.
  • Endemic (en-dem f -ik) (iv, in; dv/ioc, a people). Of a disease, found in a certain place more or less constantly.
  • Endemoepidemic (en - dem - o - ep-e-dem' - ik) . Endemic, but periodically becoming epidemic.
  • Endermic (en-der' -mik) (iv, in; dip/xa, the skin). Situated on or applied to the true skin; within the skin. E. Medication, a method of administering medicines through the skin after removal of the cuticle by means of a blister.
  • Endermosis (en-der -mo' -sis) (see Endermic). 1. A method of administering medicines through the skin by rubbing. 2. Any her- petic affection of a mucosa.
  • Endo lymph . (en' - do - Urn) (endo-; lympha, water). The fluid of the membranous laby- rinth of the ear.
  • Endo- (en-do-) (svoov, within), A prefix meaning within.
  • Endoabdominal (en-do-ab-dom' -in-al) . Within the abdomen.
  • Endoaortitis (en-do-a-or-ti' -tis) . See End- aortitis.
  • Endoappendicitis (en-do-ap-en-dis-i'-tis) (endo-; appendicitis). Inflammation of the mucosa of the vermiform appendix.
  • Endoauscultation (en-do-aws-kul-ta f -shun) (endo-; auscultare, to listen to). A method of auscultation by means of an esophageal tube passed into the stomach.
  • Endoblast (en' '-do-blast) (endo-; (jXaoxoc, a germ). The cell-nucleus; the internal blastema.
  • Endoblastic (en-do-blas'-tik) (see Endoblast). 1 . Having an endoblast or nucleus. 2. Pertain- ing to the nucleus.
  • Endobronchitis (en-do-brong-ki' '-tis) (endo-; bronchitis). Inflammation of the bronchial mucosa.
  • Endocardiac, Endocardial (en-do-kar'-de-ak, -de-al) (endocardium). Situated or arising within the heart.
  • Endocardium (en - do - kar' - de - urn) (endo-; Kapdca, the heart). The serous membrane lining the interior of the heart. • Endocervicitis (en-do -ser-vis-i' -tis) (endo-; cervix, neck; tree, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the lining membrane of the cervix uteri.
  • Endochondral (en-do-kon'-dral) (endo-; xovopoc, cartilage). Situated within a cartilage.
  • Endocolitis (en-do-ko-W -tis) . See Colitis.
  • Endocomplements (en-do-kom! -ple-ments) . A class of intracellular complements.
  • Endocranial (en-do-kra'-ne-al). i. Relating to the endocranium. 2. See Intracranial.
  • Endocranium (en - do - kra r - ne - um) (endo-; upav'cov, the skull). 1. The cerebral dura. 2. The inner surface of the skull.
  • Endocular (end-ok' '-u-lar) . Intraocular.
  • Endocytic (en-do-sit 1 '-ik) (endo-; kutoc, a cell). Relating to the contents of a cell.
  • Endoderm (en' - do - derm) (endo-; depixa, skin). The inner of the two primitive cell- layers of the embryo. It lines the cavity of the primitive intestine and its derivatives. Syn., Hypoblast. See Blastoderm.
  • Endodermal, Endodermic (en-do-derm' -al, -ik). Relating to the endoderm; applied to structures originating in the lower layers of the derma, as dentin.
  • Endodiascopy (en -do - di - as' -ko- pe) (endo-; d'ea, through; okotzs'cv, to examine). Explora- tion by means of a Crookes tube introduced into a natural body-cavity.
  • Endoesophagitis (en-do-e-sof-aj-i' -tis) (endo-; esophagitis). Inflammation of the membrane lining the esophagus.
  • Endoexoteric (en - do - eks - - ter' - ik) (endo-; k^ojxepcudg, external). Applied to a disease the origin of which is both endopathic and exopathic.
  • Endogenesis, Endogeny (en-do-jen'-e-sis, en- do j'-en-e) (endo-; yheacc, production). Growth within; endogenous formation.
  • Endogenous (en -do)' -en -us) (see Endogenesis). Produced within. Applied to spore-formation or cell-formation inside of a parent -cell.
  • Endoglobular (en - do - glob' - u - lar) (endo-; globus, a ball). Within the blood-corpuscles. 26 Endolaryngeal (en-do-lar-in'-je-al) (endo-; larynx). Within the larynx.
  • Endolemma (en - do -lent' - ah). Synonym of Neurilemma.
  • Endomastoiditis (en - do - mas - toid - i' - tis) (endo-; mastoiditis). Inflammation within the mastoid cavity.
  • Endometrectomy (en - do - met - rek' - to - me) (endometrium; e/cro/z), a cutting out). The ex- tirpation of the entire mucosa of the uterus through the abdomen and incised uterus.
  • Endometrium (en - do - me' - tre - um) (endo-; (lijxpa, uterus). The mucous membrane lin- ing the uterus.
  • Endomysium (en - do - miz' - e - um) (endo-; fiuf, muscle). The connective tissue between the fibrils of a muscular bundle.
  • Endoneuritis (en-do-nu-ri'-tis). Inflammation of the endoneurium.
  • Endoneurium (en - do - nu' - re - um) (endo-; veupov, a nerve). The delicate connective tissue holding together the fibrils of a bundle of nerves.
  • Endoparasite (en - do - par' - as - it) (endo-; Tiapaoczoc, parasite). A parasite living within its host.
  • Endopathy (en-do p' -ath-e) (endo-; rzadoc, dis- ease). Any disease arising within the body.
  • Endoperiarteritis (en -do- per -e- ar-ter-i'-tis) . Endarteritis combined with periarteritis.
  • Endoperitonitis (en-do-per-it-on-i' -tis) (endo-; peritonitis). Synonym of Peritonitis.
  • Endophlebitis (en-do-fle-bi'-tis) (endo-; phle- bitis). Inflammation of the inner coat of a vein.
  • Endoplasm (en'-do-plazm) (endo-; Tz\aop.a, a thing formed). The inner granular proto- plasm of a protozoan or of a histologic cell.
  • Endorhinitis (en-do -ri-ni' -tis) (endo-; rhinitis). Inflammation of the membrane lining the nasal passages.
  • Endoscope (en' - do - skop) (endo-; okoksIv, to observe). An instrument for the examina- tion of a body-cavity through its natural outlet.
  • Endosepsis (en-do-sep' -sis) (endo-; oijtfcc, de- cay). Septicemia arising within the body. ENDOSKELETON 386 ENTACOUSTIC Endoskeleton (en - do - skel' - et - on) (endo-; oneXerbv, a dry body). The internal support- ing structure of an animal.
  • Endosmic (en-do s' -mik) . Relating to endos- mosis.
  • Endosmometer (en - dos - mom' -et- er) (endos- mosis; pkzpov, a measure). An instrument for measuring endosmosis.
  • Endosmosis (en-do s-mo' -sis) (endo-; u~6v, a plant). A fungus found in psoriasis.
  • Epidermidosis (ep-e-derm-id-o'-sis) (epidermis). A collective name for anomalous growths of the skin of epithelial origin and type.
  • Epidermis (ep-e-der'-mis) (irt'c, upon; okptia, skin). The outer layer of the skin. The scarf-skin, consisting of a layer of horny cells that protects the true skin.
  • Epididymectomy (ep-e-did-im-ek' '-tom-e) (epi- didymis; iKTop.fj, a cutting out). Excision of the epididymis.
  • Epididymis (ep-e-did'-im-is) (iizc, upon; d'cdu- p.oc, the testes). The small body lying above the testis; the superior end is the globus major; the inferior, the globus minor.
  • Epididymitis (ep-e-did-im-i'-tis) (epididymis; cxcg, inflammation). Inflammation of the epididymis.
  • Epididymoorchitis (ep-e-did-im-o-or-ki'-tis) . Epididymitis combined with orchitis.
  • Epidural (ep-e-du'-ral) (epi-; durus, hard). Situ- ated upon or over the dura.
  • Epifagus (ep-e-fa'-gus) (epi-; 4>rjyoc, the beech- tree). A genus of plants. E. americanus has astringent and antiseptic properties and is used internally in diarrhea and externally in indo- lent ulcers. Dose 30-60 min. (1.8-3.7 Cc).
  • Epigaea (ep-e-je'-ah) (e-'c, upon; foua, earth). A genus of trailing ericaceous plants. E. repens, trailing arbutus of North America, has diuretic properties.
  • Epigaster (ep-e-gas'-ter) (epigastrium). The large intestine; hindgut.
  • Epigastric (ep-e-gas f -trik) (epigastrium). Re- lating to the epigastrium. E. Reflex. See under Reflexes.
  • Epigastriocele, Epigastrocele (ep-e-gas' -tre-o- sel, ep-e-gas' -tro-seT) (epigastrium; ktjXt), a hernia). A hernia in the epigastrium.
  • Epigastrium (ep-e-gas' -tre-um) (epi-; ' yao-^p, stomach). The upper and middle part of the abdominal surface corresponding to the posi- tion of the stomach; the epigastric region. See Abdomen.
  • Epiglottic (ep-e-glot'-ik) (epiglottis). Relating to the epiglottis.
  • Epiglottidean (ep-e-glot-id'-e-an). See Epi- glottic.
  • Epiglottis (ep-e-glot'-is) (epi-; yliD-x'cc, glot- tis). A fibrocartilaginous structure that aids in preventing food and drink from passing into the larynx.
  • Epihyal Bone (ep-e-hi'-al) (epi-; hyoid). The stylohyoid ligament when it is ossified.
  • Epilation (ep-il-a' -shun) (e, out of; pilus, a hair). The extraction of hair.
  • Epilatory (ep'-il-at-o-re). Removing hair; a remedy for removing hair.
  • Epileptiform (ep-il-ep' -tif-orm) (epilepsy; forma, form). Resembling an epileptic attack.
  • Epileptisant (ep-il-ep' -tiz-ant) . 1. Producing epileptoid convulsions. 2. A drug which pro- duces epileptoid convulsions; e. g., absinthe.
  • Epileptogenic (ep-il-ep-to-jen f -ik). See Epi- leptogenous.
  • Epileptogenous (ep-il-ep -to j' '-en-us) (epilepsy; ytvvav, to produce). Producing epilepsy.
  • Epileptoid (ep-il-ep' -toid) (epilepsy; dooc, like- ness). Resembling epilepsy.
  • Epimandibular (ep-e-man-dib' -u-lar) (epi-; mandibulum, jaw). Upon or above the lower jaw.
  • Epimysium (ep-e-miz 1 '-e-um) (epi-; jj.Dc, a mus- cle). The sheath of areolar tissue surround- ing a muscle.
  • Epinephrin (ep-e-nef -rin) (epi-; veacv6p:evov, phenomenon). An exceptional sequence or unusual complication arising in the course of a disease.
  • Epiphora (ep-if -or-ah) (epi-; fyipeiv, to bear). A persistent overflow of tears, due to excess sive secretion or to impeded outflow.
  • Epiphyseal, Epiphysial (ep-e-fiz'-e-al) (epi- physis). Relating to or of the nature of an epiphysis. E. Plate. See Disc, Epi- physeal.
  • Epiphyseitis (ep -e -fiz-e -i' - tis) (epiphysis; crcc, inflammation). Inflammation of an epiphysis.
  • Epiphyseolysis (ep-e-fiz-e-ol'-is-is) (epiphysis; \O01c, a loosing). The separation of an epiphysis.
  • Epiphysis (ep-if -is -is) (epi-; (fybzodac, to grow). A process of bone attached for a time to an- other bone by cartilage, but in most cases soon becoming consolidated with the principal bone. E. cerebri, the pineal gland.
  • Epiphysitis (ep-if -is-i' -tis). See Epiphyseitis.
  • Epiphyte (ep'-e-fit) (epi-; (f>uz6u, a plant). A vegetable parasite growing on the exterior of the body.
  • Epipial (ep-e-pi'-al) (epi-; pia). Upon or above the pia mater.
  • Epipleural (ep-e-plu'-ral) (epi-; pleura). 1. Relating to a pleurapophysis. 2. Located on the side of the thorax.
  • Epiplocele (ep-ip'-lo-sel) (epiploon; ktIt), her- nia). A hernia containing omentum.
  • Epiploic (ep-ip-lo'-ik) (epiploon). Relating or belonging to the omentum. E. Appendages, small pouches of peritoneum filled with fat, found on the colon.
  • Epiploon (ep-ip'-lo-on) (e-'c-.Xoov, from er.'c, upon; xhb, to float). The omentum.
  • Epiplopexy (ep-ip'-lo-peks-e) (epiploon; -fj^cc, a fixing in). Talma's operation of suturing the great omentum to the anterior abdominal wall for the purpose of establishing a col- lateral venous circulation in cirrhosis of the liver.
  • Epipolic (ep-e-pol'-ik) (e-i-o\r h at the top). Relating to fluorescence.
  • Epipteric (ep-ip-ter'-ik) (epi-; pterion). Upon or above the pterion. E. Bone. See under Bone.
  • Episarkin (ep-e-sark'-in) (epi-; aap$, flesh), C 4 H 6 N 3 0. A xanthin base which occurs in normal urine of man and dogs and in the urine in leukemia. EPISCLERA 392 EPITHELIUM Episclera (ep-e-skle'-rah) (epi-; okXt)poc, hard). The loose connective tissue lying between the conjunctiva and the sclera.
  • Episcleral (ep-e-skle'-ral) (episclera). Situated on the outside of the sclerotic coat.
  • Episcleritis (ep - e - skle - ri' - tis) (episclera; exec, inflammation). An inflammation of the subconjunctival tissues or of the sclera itself.
  • Episio- (ep-iz-e-o-). A prefix signifying relation to the pubes.
  • Episioelytrorrhaphy (ep-iz-e-o-el-it-ror'-af-e) (episio-; elytrorrhaphy). The operation of suturing a ruptured perineum and narrowing the vagina for the support of a prolapsed uterus.
  • Episioperineorrhaphy (ep-iz-e-o-per-in-e-or 1 '- af-e). See Episioelytrorrhaphy .
  • Episiorrhaphy (ep-iz-e-or'-a-fe) (episio-; pacfyrj, seam). An operation for the repair of tears about the vulva.
  • Episiostenosis (ep-iz-e-o-sten-o'-sis) (episio-; ozsvoc, narrow). Contraction or narrowing of the vulva.
  • Episiotomy (ep-iz-e-ot'-o-me) (episio-; rop.ii, section). Incision through the vulva in child- birth, to prevent rupture of the perineum and to facilitate labor.
  • Epispadias (ep-e^spa' -de-as) (epi-; aizattv, to pierce). A condition in which the urethra opens on the upper part of the penis, either on the dorsum or on the glans.
  • Epispastic (ep-e-spas'-tik) (epi-; anaatc, a draw- ing), i. Blistering. 2. A substance produc- ing a blister.
  • Epistasis (e-pis' -las-is) (epi-; "coraoda!, to stand). 1. A scum or film of substance floating on the surface of urine. 2. A checking or stoppage of a hemorrhage or other discharge.
  • Epistaxis (ep-is-taks' '-is) (kntaxa^iv, to cause to drop). Hemorrhage from the nose.
  • Episternal (ep-e-ster 1 '-nal) (epi-; oxkpvov, the sternum). Above the sternum.
  • Episthotonos, Episthotonus (ep-is-ihoV '-o-nos, -us). See Emprosthotonos.
  • Epitela (ep-e-te'-lah) (epi-; tela, a web). The delicate tissue of Vieussen's valve.
  • Epithalamic (ep-e-thaV '-am-ik) (epi-; thalamus). Situated upon the thalamus.
  • Epithelial (ep-e-the 1 '-le-al) (epithelium). Per- taining to or made up of epithelium.
  • Epitheliogenetic (ep - e - the -le-o - jen-et'-ik) (epithelium; ykvtacg, generation). Originat- ing from undue epithelial proliferation.
  • Epithelioid (ep-e-the' -le-oid) (epithelium; eldoc, likeness). Resembling epithelium.
  • Epitheliolysin (ep-e-the-le-oV -is-in) (epithelium; Xuoic, a loosing). A cytolysin produced by inoculation with epithelial cells.
  • Epitheliolytic (ep-e-the-le-o-lif '-ik) . Capable of bringing about the destruction of epithelial cells. Metchnikoff found that the introduc- tion of comminuted epithelium into the blood gave this power to the serum.
  • Epitheliomatous (ep-e-the-le-om' -at-us) . Hav- ing the nature of an epithelioma.
  • Epitheliomuscular (ep-e-the-le-o-mus' '-ku-lar) . Resembling epithelium and muscle.
  • Epitonic (ep-e-ton'-ik) (iznetvscv, to stretch). Tightly drawn; on the stretch.
  • Epitonos, Epitonus (ep - e - to' - nos, - nus). 1. See Epitonic. 2. Anything exhibiting ab- normal tension or stretched from one point to another.
  • Epitrichium (ep-e-trik'-e-um) \epi-; rpr/cov, hair). Superficial layer of fetal epidermis.
  • Epitrochanterian (ep-e-tro-kan-te' '-re-an) \epi-; trochanter). Situated upon the trochanters.
  • Epitrochiear (ep-e-trok'-le-ar). Applied to muscles of the forearm which are attached to the epitrochlea.
  • Epitrochlea (ep-e-trok'-le-ah) \epi-; -poyak'ta, a pulley). The internal condyle of the humerus.
  • Epitympanic (ep-e-tim-pan 1 '-ik) \epi-; xbp.izavov, the tympanum). Upon or above the tym- panum. E. Recess, the attic.
  • Epitympanum (ep-e-tim'-pan-um). The attic.
  • Epityphlon (ep-e-tif '-Ion) \epi-; xufylbv, the cecum). Kuster's name for the vermiform appendix.
  • Epivertebral (ep-e-ver' -te-braT) \epi-; vertebra). 1. Situated upon a vertebra. 2. A spinous process of a vertebra.
  • Epizoon (ep-e-zo'-on) \epi-; CcXelv, to love). Auerbach's term for the red-staining nuclear substance of animal _and vegetal cells.
  • Erythrophilous (er-ith-ro j'-il-us) (see Erythro- phil). Having an especial affinity for red dyes.
  • Erythrophlein (er-ith-ro' -le-in) (erythro-; Xoibe, bark). A poisonous alkaloid from casca-bark. E. Hydro chlorate, a local anesthetic and cardiac tonic; used chiefly in ophthalmology in 0.05 to 0.25% solution. Dose 3V —tV gr. (0.002-0.004 Gm.).
  • Erythrophleum (er-ith-rof'-le-um). Casca- bark.
  • Erythropsia (er-ith-rop' -se-ah) (erythro-; o^cc, vision). An abnormity of vision in which all objects appear red; red vision.
  • Erythropykno sis (er - ith -ro- pik - no' - sis) (erythro-; nunvbc, thick). Degenerative changes in the invaded erythrocyte, charac- teristic of the estivoautumnal infections. It consists in the development of a brassy appearance of the blood-cell, together with distinct crenation.
  • Erythrosin (er-ith-ro' -sin) (erythro-; tyrosin), CaoHjgN^Og. A compound product by the action of HN0 3 on tyrosin. It is used as a coloring-matter. Erythrosis (er-ith-ro' -sis) (ipodpoc, red). 1. Ar- terial plethora, or the redness of the skin due to it. 2. An exaggerated tendency to blush.
  • Erythroxylin (er-ith-roks' -il-in) (erythro-; $uXov, wood). Synonym of Cocain.
  • Eschar (es'-kar) (£o%apa, a scab). A slough, especially that produced by the thermocau- tery. E., Neuropathic, a bed-sore.
  • Escharotic (es-kar-of -ik) (ia^npcorcKoc;)- 1. Caustic; producing _ a slough. 2. A sub- stance that produces an eschar; a caustic.
  • Esciorcinol (es-e-or' -sin-ol) . Same as Esciorcin.
  • Escorcin, iEscorcin (es-kor'-sin). See Es- ciorcin.
  • Esculetin (es-ku-W -tin) (Msculus, a genus of trees), C 9 H 6 4 . A substance present in the bark of the horse-chestnut, partly free, and partly as the glucosid esculin, from which it is prepared.
  • Esculin (es'-ku-lin) (see Esculetin), C 15 H 16 9 . A glucosid from horse-chestnut bark.
  • Eseridin (es-er' -id-in) . An alkaloid, C 15 H 23 - N3O3. It is a laxative and motor excitant and is recommended as a cathartic in veterin- ary practice. Its uses are the same as eserin, but it is only -one-sixth as powerful. Sub- cutaneous dose \-\ gr. (0.01-0.02 Gm.).
  • Esodic (e-sod'-ik) (ic, into; odoc, way). Afferent.
  • Esoethmoiditis (es - o - eth - moid - i' - tis) (eoaj,- within; ethmoiditis). Osteomyelitis of the ethmoid.
  • Esohyperphoria (es -o -hi- per-Jo f -re-ah). See Hyperesophoria under Heterophoria.
  • Esophageal (e-sof-af-e-al) (esophagus). Per- taining or belonging to the esophagus.
  • Esophageurysma (e-so-faj-ur-iz' -mah) (esoph- agus; eupuveev, to widen). Abnormal dilation of the esophagus.
  • Esophagismus (e-sof-aj-iz'-mus) (esophagus). Spasmodic contraction of the esophagus.
  • Esophagitis (e-sof-aj-i'-tis) (esophagus; exec, in- flammation). Inflammation of the esophagus.
  • Esophago- (e-sof-a-go-) (esophagus). A prefix meaning relating to the esophagus.
  • Esophagocele (e-sof'-ag-o-sel) (esophago-; ktjXtj, hernia). An abnormal distention of a portion of the esophagus.
  • Esophagoectasis (e-sof-ag-o-ek-ta 1 '-sis) (esopha- go-; enrEcvecv, to stretch). Diffuse spindle- form dilation of the esophagus, almost always due to stenosis of the cardia.
  • Esophagoenterostomy (e-sof-ag-o-en-ter-os' -to- me) (esophago-; enterostomy). Schlatter's operation for the total extirpation of the stomach; the esophagus is first sutured to the duodenum.
  • Esophagometer (e-sof-ag-om' '-et-er) (esophago-; p.kxpov, a measure). An instrument for measur- ing the esophagus.
  • Esophagomycosis (e-sof-ag-o-mi-ko' -sis) (esoph- ago-; mycosis). Disease of the esophagus caused by fungi.
  • Esophagoplasty (e-sof ' -ag-o-plast-e) (esophago-; nXaooeev, to shape). Plastic surgery of the esophagus.
  • Esophagoptosis (e-sof-ag-o-to 1 '-sis) (esophago-; nzcbocc, a falling). Prolapse of the esophagus.
  • Esophagoscope (e-sof-ag'-o-skop) (esophago-; oKoxelv, to view). An instrument for examining the interior of the esophagus by artificial light.
  • Esophagoscopy ((e-sof-ag-os' -ko-pe) (see Esoph- agoscope). Examination of the interior of the esophagus by means of the esophagoscope.
  • Esophagospasm (e-sof -ag-o-spazm). See Eso- phagismus.
  • Esophagostenosis (e-sof-ag-o-sten-o' -sis) (esoph- ago-; oxkvwoec, constriction). Constriction of the esophagus.
  • Esophagotome (e - so - ag' - o - torn) . An in- strument devised for cutting into the esoph- agus.
  • Esophagotomy (e-sof -ag-ot' -o-me) (esophago-; ropLTj, a cutting). Opening of the esophagus by an incision.
  • Esophagus (e-sof -ag-us) (oeoocfrayoc, the gul- let). The gullet, a musculomembranous canal, about nine inches in length, extending from the pharynx to the stomach.
  • Esophoria (es-o-fo'-re-ah). See Heterophoria.
  • Esosphenoiditis (es-o-sfe-noid-i'-tis) (eoco, with- in; sphenoid; exec, inflammation). Osteomye- litis of the sphenoid bone.
  • Esoteric (e-so-ter'-ik) (iocoxepoc, within). Aris- ing within the organism.
  • Esothyropexy (es-o-thi'-ro-peks-e). See Exo- thyropexy.
  • Esotropia (e-so-tro'-pe-ah) (eoco, inward; xpkizzev, to turn). Convergent strabismus.
  • Espnoic (esp-no'-ik) (ic, into; nvorj, vapor), i. Inspiratory. 2. Relating to the injection of gases or vapors.
  • Essence (es'-ens) (essentia, essence). 1. That which gives to anything its character or peculiar quality. 2. The peculiar qualities of a drug extracted and reduced to a small compass. 3. A solution of an essential oil in alcohol.
  • Essential (es-en'-shal) (essence). 1. Pertain- ing to the essence of a substance. 2. Of diseases, occurring without a known cause. E. Oils, the volatile oils obtained from aro- matic plants by distillation or fermentation.
  • Estates (es-ta'-tez) (L., pi.). Freckles or sun- burn.
  • Ester (es'-ter). A compound ether containing both an acid and an alcohol radicle.
  • Esthesioblast (es-the 1 ' -ze-o-blast) (a'eodrjoec, sen- sation; ftXaoxoc, a germ). Same as Ganglio- blast.
  • Esthesiometer (es-ihe-ze-om'-e-ter) (a'eadrjoec, sensation; jitcpov, a measure). An instru- ment for measuring tactile sensibility.
  • Esthesioneure (es - the' -ze-o - nur) (a'eadrjaec, sensation; vtbpov, a nerve). A sensory neuron.
  • Esthiomene (es-the-om'-en-e) (iodeofievT), eating). Lupus vulgaris.
  • Estimation (es-tru-a' -shun) (eslrum). Sexual excitement; the socalled heat of animals.
  • Estival (es'-tiv-al) (cestas, summer). In biology, produced in summer.
  • Estrum (es'-trum) (olorpoc, gadfly). Sexual desire; the orgasm.
  • Estuarium (es-tu-a'-re-um) (cestus, heat), i. A vapor-bath; also a stove designed to apply warm, dry air to all parts of the body at the same time. 2. A tube through which a hot cautery-iron can be passed to the part to be operated upon.
  • Esuritis (es-u-ri' -tis) (esuries, hunger). 'Gastric ^ulceration from inanition.
  • Etat Mamellone (et-ah mah-mel-on-a) (Fr.). A condition of the stomach in chronic gastritis in which there is a projection of small eleva- tions consisting of hyperplastic mucous mem- brane.
  • Ethane (eth'-dn) (ether). Paraffin; any one of the products of the dry distillation of wood, turf, bituminous shales, lignite, bituminous coal, and other coals rich in hydrogen.
  • Ethanol (eth' -an-ol) . See Alcohol (2).
  • Ethene (eth' -en). Same as Ethylene. E. Chlorid, C 2 H 4 C1 2 . Dutch liquid. An anes- thetic resembling chloroform, but less danger- ous.
  • Ethereal (e-the'-re-al) (ether). 1. Pertaining to the ether. 2. Made of ether, as ethereal tinctures. 3. Volatile.
  • Etheride (e'-ther-id). A comprehensive term for any combination of formyl with a haloid.
  • Etherin, Etherine (e'-thcr-in, -en). 1. C 16 H 32 ( ?) . A solid, crystalline body, obtained from ethylene by distillation. 2. A toxin extracted in ether, by Auclair, from tubercle bacilli. Syn., Ether obacillin.
  • Etherioscope (e-the'-re-o-skop) (ether; otconeev, to examine). An apparatus for estimating the proportions of ether or of acetic acid to water in a given solution.
  • Etherization (e-ther-iz-d '-shun) (ether). The administration of ether to produce anesthesia. This is effected by inhalation of the vapor.
  • Etherize (e'-ther -iz) (ether). To administer ether.
  • Ethero chloroform (e-ther-o-klo'-ro-form). A mixture of ether and chloroform employed in long-continued anesthesia.
  • Etherobacillin (e-ther-o-bas-iV -in) . See Ether- in (2).
  • Etheryl (e'-ther-il). See Ethylene.
  • Ethidene (eth' -id-en) (ether), C 2 H 4 . Ethylidene, a bivalent radicle. E. Chlorid, E. Dichlorid, a colorless fluid, tasting and smelling like chloroform. It has been used as a general anesthetic. See under Anesthetic.
  • Ethin, Ethine (eth' -in, -en). See Acetylene.
  • Ethiomopemphigus (eth-e-o-mo-pem'-fe-gus) (Wifioc, accustomed; nipefic^, a pustule). Con- tinued or habitual pemphigus.
  • Ethionic (eth-e-on'-ik) (ethylene; duov, sulfur). Made up of ethylene and a sulfur compound.
  • Ethmo vomerine (eth-mo-vo'-mer-en). Relat- ing to the ethmoid bone and the vomer.
  • Ethmocarditis (eth-mo-kar-di'-tis) (rfipioc, a ETHMOCEPHALUS 400 ETHYLENIMID sieve; napo'ca, heart; a eg, inflammation). In- flammation of the connective tissue of the heart.
  • Ethmocephalus (eth-mo-sej f -al-us) (rjd/xoc, a sieve; K£aXi, head). A variety of single autositic monsters in which there is a rudi- mentary nose in the shape of a proboscis terminating anteriorly in two imperfect nos- trils or in a single opening.
  • Ethmodermitis (eth-mo-derm-i' -tis) (rjOiiog, a sieve; dipfia, the skin; ex eg, inflammation). Inflammation of the connective tissue of the skin.
  • Ethmoid (eth' '-moid) \j)d(xog, a, sieve; eldoc, likeness), i. The sieve-like bone of the nose, perforated for the transmission of the olfac- tory nerve; it forms a part of the base of the skull. 2. Relating to the ethmoid bone.
  • Ethmoiditis (eth-moi-di' -tis) (ethmoid; txec, in- flammation). Inflammation of the ethmoid bone or of the ethmoid sinuses.
  • Ethmoidofrontal (eth-moid-o-ront r -at) . Re- lating to the ethmoid and frontal bones.
  • Ethmolacrimal (eth-mo-lak' '-re-mat) . Relat- ing to the junction of the ethmoid and lacrimal bones.
  • Ethmopalatine (eth-mo-paV -a-ten) . Relating to the ethmoid and palatal bones, area, or cartilage.
  • Ethmophlogosis (eth-mo-flo-go' '-sis) . See Cel- lulitis.
  • Ethmosphenoid (eth-mo-sfe' -noid) . Relating to the ethmoid and sphenoid bones.
  • Ethmyphitis (eth-mif-i f -tis). See Cellulitis.
  • Ethnology (eth-nol r -o-je) (edvoc, a nation; Xoyoc, science). The comparative study of the races of mankind.
  • Ethoxid (eth-oks'-id), R. O . C 2 H 5 . A com- pound of ethyl, oxygen, and a radicle or ele- ment; an ethylate.
  • Ethoxycaffein (eth-oks-e-kaf'-e-in), C 10 H 14 N 4 O 3 . A remedy recommended in herpes zoster and migraine. Dose 4 gr. (0.26 Gm.).
  • Ethylamin (eth -if -am- in) (ethyl; amin), C 2 H 7 N. A ptomain found in putrefying yeast. E. Urate, a remedy for gout and vesical calculi.
  • Ethylate (eth'-il-dt). A compound of ethylic alcohol in which the H of the hydroxy! is replaced by a base.
  • Ethylenethenyl diamin (eth-il-en-eth-en-il-dl'- am-in). See Lysidin.
  • Ethylenimid, Ethylenimin (eth-il-en-im f -id, -4n). 1. See Piper azin. 2. C 2 H 5 N. A non- ETHYLIC 401 EUDOSMOI. poisonous base found in cholera cultures and believed to be identical with spermin.
  • Ethylic (eth-iV-ik). Relating to or obtained from ethyl. E. Alcohol, ethyl-alcohol. E. Aldehyd, acetic aldehyd. E. Ether. See Ether (3). ' Ethylidene (eth-iV -id-en). See Ethidene.
  • Ethylidenediamin (eth-il-id-en-dV -a -min), C 2 H 4 ,(NH 2 ) 2 . A poisonous ptomain obtained from decomposing haddock. Injections into mice and guineapigs produce hypersecretion from mouth, nose, and eyes, mydriasis, exoph- thalmos, great dyspnea, and death.
  • Ethylism (eth'-il-izm). Poisoning by ethyl- alcohol.
  • Ethylization (eth-il-i-za r -shun) . The induction of the physiologic effects of ethyl bromid.
  • Ethylize (etli'-il-iz). To anesthetize with ethyl bromid.
  • Ethylol (eth'-il-ol). Ethyl chlorid.
  • Ethylphenylcarbamate, Ethylphenylure- thane (eih-il-je-nil-kar' -ba-mat, -u' -re-thdn) . See Euphorin.
  • Etiologic (e-te-ol-oj'-ik) . Pertaining to etiology.
  • Etiology (e-te-ol'-o-je) (ahca, a cause; Xoyoc, science). 1. The causation of disease. 2. The science of the causes of the phenomena of life and their relation to physical laws in general.
  • Etionymous, ^Etionymous (e-te-on' -im-us) (ahca, a cause; ovufxa, name). A term de- rived from the name of a cause; it is applied to diseases; e. g., alcoholism, lead-colic.
  • Eubiol (u'-be-ol). A preparation of hemoglobin.
  • Eubiose (u'-be-oz). A highly concentrated proprietary hematogenous substance.
  • Eucalyptene (u-kal-ip'-ten), C 10 H 16 . A hydro- carbon from eucalyptol; the hydrochlorid is used as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose 20-30 gr. (1.33-2.0 Gm.). E. Hydrochlorate. See Eucalypteol.
  • Eucalypteol (u-kal-if-le-ol), C 10 H 16 2HC1. It is used as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose 24 gr. (1.6 Gm.) daily. Children, 4-12 gr. (0.26-0.78 Gm.) daily. Syn., Terpilene dihydrochlorate.
  • Eucanthus (u-kan' '-thus) (eu, expressive of greatness; canthus). Any enlargement of the fleshy papilla at the inner canthus of the eye.
  • Eucasin (u f -ka-sin) . A casein food-preparation soluble in warm water, obtained by pouring ammonia over casein.
  • Euchinin (u'-kin-in), C 2 H s O . CO . OC 20 H 23 O. An ethylcarbonic ester of quinin. It is used in whooping-cough, pneumonia, malaria, etc. Dose 15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.).
  • Euchlorin (u-klor'-in) (eft, well; j^w^oc, green). 1. Chlorin protoxid, an antiseptic. 2. A mixture of potassium chlorate and hydro- chloric acid; it is used as a spray and gargle in diphtheria.
  • Euchlornydria (u-klor-hi 1 '-dre-ah) (so, well; %Xwpbc, green; udcbp, water). The presence of a normal amount of hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice.
  • Euchromatopsia (u-kro-mat-op'-se-ah) (eb, well; %p6a\n6c, eye). Abnormal protrusion of the eyeballs.
  • Exoskeleton (eks-o-skeV '-et-ori) (exo-; ontXexov, a dried body). The rigid outer envelop of many of the lower forms of life for the protection and attachment o'f organs.
  • Exosmosis (eks-os-mo'-sis) (exo-; d>o/wc, thrust). Outward osmosis. See Osmosis.
  • Exosplenopexia, Exosplenopexy (eks-o-sple- no-peks'-e-ah, eks-o-sple 1 '-no-peks-e) (exo-; gtzXtjv, spleen; 7irj$cc, fixation). An operation substituted for splenectomy, which consists in attaching the spleen in the abdominal wound and fixing it there by its capsule.
  • Exostosis (eks-os-to'-sis) (exo-; oaxkov, bone). A bony outgrowth from the surface of a bone.
  • Exotery (eks-ot'-er-e). See Exopathy.
  • Exothyropexy (eks-o-thi' -ro-peks-e) (exo-; thyroid; nfj^cc, fixation). Exposing the enlarged thyroid gland by a median incision and drawing it outside.
  • Exoticosymphysis (eks -ot-ik-o- sim' - fe-sis) (Izojtckoc, foreign; obfi^uacg, a growing to- gether). The union of a substance or body with the organism.
  • Exotospore (eks-o' -to-spor) (e£ oorc koc, outward; oizbpoc, seed). The malarial germ brought by the stab of the mosquito (Anopheles) into the human blood-vessels; so named from being formed outside the human body.
  • Exotropia (eks-o-tro'-pe-ah). See Strabismus.
  • Expectant (eks-pek' -tant) (expectare, to look out for). Awaiting or expecting. E. Treat- ment, watching the progress of a disease, and not interfering unless warranted by special symptoms.
  • Expectorant (eks-pek' -to-rant) (see Expectora- tion), i. Promoting expectoration. 2. A remedy that promotes or modifies expecto- ration.
  • Expiration (eks-pi-ra' -shun) (expirare, to breathe out). The act of breathing forth or expelling air from the lungs.
  • Expiratory (eks - pi' -ra - to - re) (see Expir- ation). Relating to expiration.
  • Exploration (eks-plo-ra' -shun) (explorare, to search out). The act of exploring; investi- gation of a part hidden from sight by means of touch, by artificial light, etc.
  • Exploratory (eks-plor'-at-o-re). Pertaining to exploration. E. Puncture, the puncture of a cavity or tumor and extraction therefrom of some of the contents to learn their nature.
  • Expulsive (eks-pul'-siv) (expellere, to drive out). Forcing out.
  • Exsanguinate (ek-san' -gwin-dt) (ex; sanguis, blood). 1. To render bloodless. 2. Bloodless.
  • Exsanguination (ek-san-gwin-a' -shun) (ex- sanguinate). The act of making bloodless.
  • Exsection (ek-sek' -shun) (ex; secare, to cut). The act of cutting a part out from its sur- roundings.
  • Exsertor (ek-serf -or) (exserere, to protrude). A muscle which protrudes a part.
  • Exsiccation (ek-sik-a' -shun) (ex; siccus, dry). The act of drying; especially the depriving of a crystalline substance of its water of crystallization.
  • Exsiccative (ek-sik'-a-tiv). Drying.
  • Extasis (ek' -stasis) . See Ecstasy.
  • Extension (eks - ten' - shun) (extendere, to stretch out). A straightening out, especially the muscular movement by which a flexed limb is made straight. Counter extension EXTENSOMETER 407 EXUDATION is traction made on a part in a direction opposite to that in which traction is made by another force.
  • Extensometer (eks-tens-om' -et-er) (extension; pihpov, a measure). A micrometer to measure the expansion of a body.
  • Extensor (eks-tens' -or) (extension. That which stretches out or extends, as extensor muscles. See under Muscle. ' Exterioration (eks-te-re-or-a' -shun) (exterior, outer). The faculty of mind by which the image of an object seen is referred to the real situation of the object.
  • External (eks-ter'-nal) (externus, outward). On the exterior, or on the side removed from the center or middle line of the body.
  • Externalize (eks-ter' -nal-iz) (external). i. In psychology, to transform an idea or im- pression which is on the percipient's mind into a phantasm apparently outside him. 2. To refer to some outside source, as the voices heard by the subject of psychomotor hal- lucinations.
  • Extirpation (eks-ter-pa' '-shun) (extirpare, to root out). Complete removal of a part.
  • Extra ventricular (eks-trah-ven-trik' '-u-lar) . Ex- ternal to a ventricle.
  • Extra- (eks-trah-) . A prefix meaning outside; without.
  • Extraamniotic (eks-trah-am-ne-ot' -ik) . Out- side of the amnion; between the amnion and the chorion.
  • Extraarticular (eks-trah-ar-tik' '-u-lar) . Out- side of the proper structures of a joint.
  • Extracapsular (eks-trah-kap'-su-lar) . Outside of the capsular ligament of a joint.
  • Extracellular (eks-trah-seV -u-lar) . External to the cells of an organism.
  • Extracranial (eks-trah-kra f -ne-al). Outside of the cranial cavity.
  • Extraction (eks-trak'-shun) (extract). 1. The act of drawing out. 2. The process of mak- ing an extract. E. of Cataract, removal of a cataractous lens by surgical operation.
  • Extractive (eks-trak'-tiv) (extract). Any or- ganic substance that may be extracted in small amount from animal tissues.
  • Extractor (eks-trak'-tor) (extract). An instru- ment for extracting bullets, sequestrums, etc.
  • Extradural (eks-trah-du'-ral) (extra-; durus, hard). Situated outside of the dura. Extraembryonic (eks-trah-em-bre-on'-ik). Sit- uated without or not forming a part of the embryo; it is said of certain structures of the ovum.
  • Extraepithelial (eks-trah-ep-e-the f -le-al). Out- side of an epithelium.
  • Extragenital (eks-trah-jen'-it-al). Not situated upon the genitals; applied to chancres.
  • Extraligamentous (eks-trah-lig-a-ment'-us) . External to a ligament.
  • Extralobular (eks-trah-lob' -u-lar) . Outside of a lobe.
  • Extramedullar (eks-trah-med'-ul-ar-e) (ex- tra-; medidla). Situated or occurring outside of the medulla.
  • Extraneous (eks-tra'-ne-us) (extraneus, exter- nal). Existing or belonging outside the or- ganism.
  • Extranuclear (eks-trah-nu'-kle-ar). Outside the nucleus of a cell.
  • Extraorganismal (eks-trah-or-gan-iz'-mal) . External to the organism.
  • Extraperitoneal (eks-trah-per-it-on-e'-al). Ex- ternal to the peritoneal cavity.
  • Extrapolar (eks-trah-po' -lar) (extra-; polus, a pole). Not lying in the space between the electrodes of a battery.
  • Extraradical (eks-trah-rad'-ik-al). Applied to hydrogen atoms not replaceable by a negative or alcoholic radicle, but replaceable by a base.
  • Extrarenal (eks-trah-re'-nal). External to the kidney.
  • Extrasystole (eks-trah-sis'-to-le). A heart-con- traction occurring earlier than the normal systole if the heart-muscle is irritated during the diastolic period.
  • Extrathoracic (eks-trah-tho-ras f -ik). External to the thoracic cavity.
  • Extratriceps (eks-trah-tri'-seps). The outer head of the triceps muscle.
  • Extrauterine (eks-trah-u' -ter-in) (extra-; uterus). Outside of the uterus. E. Pregnancy. See Pregnancy, Extrauterine.
  • Extravasation (eks-trav-as-a' -shun) (extra-; vas, a vessel). 1. The passing of fluid outside of the cavity or space normally containing it. 2. The fluid that has passed out.
  • Extravascular (eks-trah-vas' -ku-lar) (see Ex- travasation). Outside of the vessels.
  • Extrinsic (eks-trin' '-sik) (extrinsicus, from without). External; not directly belonging to a part. E. Muscles, those situated on the exterior of an organ.
  • Exudation (eks-u-da' '-shun) (exudate). The pass- ing out of serum or pus; the material that has passed out. EXUDATIVE 408 EYELID Exudative (eks-u-da'-tiv) (exudate). Of the nature of or characterized by exudation.
  • Exutoria (eks-u-to' -re-ah) (exurere, to burn). Substances which cause a superficial ulcera- tion of the skin when applied.
  • Eye (i) (AS., edge). The organ of vision. It occupies the anterior part of the orbit
  • FTUctosuiia. (fruk-to-su'-re~ah). See Levulosuria.
  • Fabella (fa-bel'-ah) (dim. of faba, a bean). A sesamoid fibrocartilage or small bone occa- sionally developed in the gastrocnemius muscle.
  • Facet (fas'-et) (Fr., facette, a little face). A small plane surface, especially on a bone or a hard body, like a calculus.
  • Facies (fa'-she-ez) (L., "face"). The appear- ance of the face. F. hippocratica, an ap- pearance of the face indicative of the rapid approach of dissolution: the nose is pinched, the temples hollow, the eyes sunken, the ears leaden and cold, the lips relaxed, the skin livid. F. leontina. See Leontiasis.
  • Faciolingual (fa-she-o-lin 1 '-gwal) . Relating to the face and tongue.
  • Factitious (fak-tish' -us) (facere, to make). Artificial.
  • Faecal, Faeces (fe'-kal, fe'-sez) . See Fecal, Feces.
  • Faenum-graecum (Jen - um - gre' - kum) . See Fenugreek.
  • Faint (fdnt) (feindre, to feign; ME., faynt, weak). 1. A condition of languor. 2. A state of syncope or swooning.
  • Falciform (faV -si-form) (falx; forma, form). Having the shape of a sickle. F. Ligament. See Ligament, Falciform. F. Process, a pro- cess of the dura mater that separates the hemispheres of the brain; the falx.
  • Falcular (fal'-ku-lar) (falx). Sickle-shaped.
  • Falling (fawV-ing) (AS., feallan, to fall). Dropping down. F. -sickness, epilepsy. F. of the Womb, a descent of the uterus into the vagina.
  • Falx (falks) (L.). A sickle; a sickle-shaped structure. F. cerebelli, a sickle-like process of dura mater between the lobes of the cere- bellum. F. cerebri, the process of the dura separating the hemispheres of the cerebrum.
  • Familial (fam-il'-yal). Characteristic of a family.
  • Fango (fan' -go). Clay from the hot springs of Battaglio, Italy; it is used as a local application in gout. F. -therapy, the thera- peutic application of heat and pressure by means of heated fango or other mud.
  • Farad (far'-ad) (after Michael Faraday, a physicist). The unit of electric capacity; a capacity sufficient to hold one coulomb of current having a potential of one volt.
  • Faradic, Faradaic (far-ad' -ik, far-ad-a' -ik) . Pertaining to induced electric currents. F. Current, the induced electric current.
  • Faradism (far' -ad-izm) (see Farad), i. The electricity produced in an induced or faradic current. 2. Faradization.
  • Faradization (far-ad-iz-a! -shun) (see Farad). Faradism; the application of the induced current to a diseased part. F., General, the therapeutic application of the electric current to the organism as a whole.
  • Farcy (far'-se) (farcire, to stuff). The form of glanders that attacks the skin and lym- phatic glands.
  • Farfara (far' -far -ah). See Coltsfoot.
  • Farina (Jar-e'-nah) (L., "meal"). The ground or powdered starchy part of seeds, especially that of corn, barley, rye, and wheat.
  • Farinaceous (far-in-a' -she-us) (farina). Hav- ing the nature of or yielding flour.
  • Fascial (fah'-she-al) (fascia). Pertaining to or of the nature of a fascia.
  • Fasciculated (fas-ik' -u-la-ted) . United into bundles or fascicles.
  • Fascitis (fas-i'-tis). Inflammation of a fascia.
  • Fastigium (fas-tif-e-um) (L., "summit"). The acme of a disease.
  • Fatigue (fa-teg') (fatigo, weariness). Weariness. F. Diseases, those caused by constant repetition of certain muscular movements. F. Fever, fever following excessive exertions, and supposed to be caused by the absorption of waste-products.
  • Fatty (fat'-e) (fat). Containing fat or de- rived from fat. F. Acids, a series of acids with the general formula C n H 2n 2 , some of the members of which combine with glycerol to form fats. F. Degeneration. See Degen- eration, Fatty.
  • Faucial (faw'-se-al) (fauces). Pertaining to the fauces.
  • Faucitis (faw-si'-tis) (jauces; ncc, inflamma- tion). Inflammation of the fauces.
  • Favosoareolate (fa-vo-so-ar-e' '-o-lat) (favus; areola). Pitted with reticular markings.
  • Febralgene (feb-ral'-jen). A proprietary anti- pyretic and sedative. Dose 2^-5 gr. (0.16- 0.32 Gm.).
  • Febricide (feb r -ris-ld) (jebris; ccedere, to kill). Destructive fever.
  • Febricula (feb^rik'-u-lah) (Jebris). A slight fever of short duration, most frequently en- countered among children.
  • Febrifuge (feb'-rif-uj) (jebris; fugare, to dispel). 1. Dispelling fever. 2. An agent that lessens fever.
  • Febrile (jcb'-ril) (jebris). Pertaining to or characterized by fever.
  • Febrinol (jeb'-re-noT). A proprietary antipy- retic and analgesic remedy.
  • Febris (feb'-ris) (L.). A fever (q. v.).
  • Fecal (fe'-kal) (feces). Pertaining to, consisting of, or discharging feces.
  • Fecula (jek'-u-lah) (dim. of ftzx, sediment). The starchy part of a seed. Also the sedi- ment subsiding from an infusion.
  • Feculent (fek f -u-lent) (fcrculentus, dreggy). Having sediment.
  • Fecundation (fe-kun-da' -shun) (fecundity). The act of fertilizing. F., Artificial, fecun- dation brought about by the injection of semen into the vagina or uterus through a syringe or other instrument.
  • Fecundity (fe-kun'-dit-e) (fecunditas, fruitful- ness). The ability to produce offspring.
  • Fellifluous (fel-if -lu-us) (fel; fluere, to flow). Flowing with gall.
  • Fellitin (fel'-it-in). A proprietary preparation of oxgall for use in frost-bite.
  • Felon (fel' -on). See Paronychia.
  • Female (fe'-mal) (femina, woman). 1. Per- . taining to the sex that conceives and bears young; pertaining to woman. 2. Denoting that part of a double-limbed instrument that receives the complementary part. F. Catheter, a catheter for emptying the female bladder.
  • Femoropopliteal (fem-or-o-pop-lit-e'-al). 1. Relating to or contained in the thigh or popliteal space. 2. Relating to the dorsal aspect of the thigh.
  • Femorotibial (fem-or-o-tib'-e-al). Relating to the femur and the tibia.
  • Femorovascular (fem-or-o-vas' '-ku-lar) (femur; vasculum, a little vase). Relating to the femoral canal.
  • Femur (fe'-mur) (L.). The thigh-bone.
  • Fence (fens) (abbreviation of defense). A line of cross-scarification made on the skin surrounding an erysipelatous area, to which a germicide is applied, to prevent progress of the disease.
  • Fenestrated (fe-nes'-tra-ted) (fenestra). Perfor- ated. F. Membrane of Henle, the layer of elastic tissue in the intima of large arteries.
  • Fennel (fen' -I). See Fceniculum.
  • Fenthozon (fen'-tho-zon). A proprietary dis- infectant and deodorant said to consist of acetic acid, 26 Gm.; phenol, 2 Gm.; menthol, camphor, and oil of eucalyptus, of each, Gm., and oils of verbena and lavender, of each, 0.5 Gm.
  • Fenugreek (fen'-u-greh). The Trigonella fee- num-gr cecum, a leguminous plant cultivated in France and Germany, the seeds of which contain two alkaloids, cholin and trigonellin. The seeds are employed for the preparation of emollient poultices, enemas, ointments, and plasters. They are not used internally.
  • Feralboid (fer-aV -bo-id). A peptonized albu- minate of iron. It is used in anemia, neuras- thenia, etc. Dose gr. (0.021-0.042 Gm.) 3 times a day. Syn., Feraldoid.
  • Fercremol (fer'-kre-mol). A brown, tasteless FEREOL'S NODOSITIES 415 FERREIN'S CANAL compound of iron and hemoglobin, containing 3% of iron. Dose 3-8 gr. (0.2-0.52 Gm.).
  • Ferralbumose (fer-al'-bu-moz). A meat pre- cipitate treated with artificial gastric juice and ferric chlorid.
  • Ferralia (fer-a'-le-ah) (ferrum, iron). Me- dicinal preparations of iron.
  • Ferrated (fer'-a-ted). Combined with iron; • containing iron.
  • Ferratogen (fer-af -o-jen) . An iron nuclein obtained by cultivating yeast on a medium impregnated with iron. It is used in treat- ment of chlorosis, the preparation containing 1% of metallic iron. Syn., Ferric nuclein.
  • Ferri cyanogen (fer-e-si-an'-o-jen). A hexad radicle, (FeC 6 N ) 2 .
  • Ferrichthol (fer-ik'-thoT). A form of ichthyol iron sulfonate which contains 3-5% of organically combined iron together with 96.5% of ichthyol sulfonic acid. It is odor- less and tasteless, and is used in the treatment of anemia and chlorosis. Dose 2 gr. (0.13 Gm.).
  • Ferricyanid (fer-e-si' -an-id) . A compound of ferricyanogen, with an element or radicle.
  • Ferrinol (jer'-in-ol). Iron nucleid, a compound of nucleol and iron oxid containing 6% of iron.
  • Ferripton (fer-ip'-lon). A proprietary prepara- tion said to contain 4% of iron, 7% of pro- teids, and 89 % of water. It is-used in anemia and chlorosis.
  • Ferro- (fer-o-) (ferrum, iron). A prefix used with the names of ferrous compounds.
  • Ferrocyanate (fer-o-si'-an-at). See Ferro- cyanid.
  • Ferrocyanic (fer-o-si-an'-ik). Composed of iron and cyanogen.
  • Ferrocyanid (fer-o-si'-an-id). A compound of ferrocyanogen, with an element or radicle.
  • Ferrocyanogen (fer-o-si-an'-o-jen). A tetra- valent radicle, Fe(CN) 6 . Ferrocyanuret (fer-o-si-an' -u-ret) . See Ferro- cyanid.
  • Ferroferric (fer-o-fer'-ik). Containing iron in both ferric and ferrous combinations.
  • Ferrohemol (fer-o-hem'-ol). Hemol containing 3% of added iron. Dose 8 gr. (0.5 Gm.).
  • Ferrol, Ferroleum (fer'-ol, fer-o' -le-um). A proprietary 50% emulsion of cod-liver oil containing iron phosphate.
  • Ferromagnesium Sulfate (fer-o-mag-ne'-se-um sul'-fat), FeS0 4 . MgS0 4 + 6H 2 0. A greenish powder, used in anemia and chlorosis. Dose 8 gr. (0.5 Gm.).
  • Ferromagnetic (fer-o-mag-nel'-ik). Having iron as a constituent and possessing mag- netic properties.
  • Ferrometer (fer-om'-et-er) (ferrum; jikxpov, a measure). An apparatus for estimating quan- titatively the iron in a minimum quantity of blood.
  • Ferrosin (fer'-o-sin). A granular or fine red powder used as a pigment and said to contain iron oxid, 70 to 75%; lime and albumin, 10 to 20%; water, 10 to 15 %.
  • Ferrosodium-citroalbuminate (fer -o-so-de- um-sit-ro-al-bu' -min-at) . A hematinic con- taining 30% of ferric oxid. Dose 23 gr. (1.5 Gm.); children, 4-8 gr. (0.26-0.52 Gm.) in soup or syrup.
  • Ferrosoferric (fer-o-so-fer' '-ik) . Containing iron as a bivalent and a trivalent radicle.
  • Ferrosoferrous (fer-o-so-fer' -us). Applied to a salt which is compounded of two ferrous salts.
  • Ferrosol (fer'-o-sol). A double combination of ferric saccharate and saccharate of sodium chlorid occurring as a clear, black-brown liquid ; used in chlorosis, anemia, and neuras- thenia. Dose 1 teaspoonful (5 Cc.) 3 times daily.
  • Ferrosomatose (fer-o-so' -mat-oz) . A combina- tion of 2% of iron with somatose; an odor- less, tasteless powder, soluble in water. It is used as a tonic in chlorosis, anemia, and debility. Dose 75-150 gr. (5-10 Gm.) daily; as a laxative, 150 gr. (10 Gm.).
  • Ferrostyptin (fer-o-stip'-tin). A preparation of iron and formaldehyd occurring in cubic crystals or crystalline powder, soluble in water, melting at 120 C. It is used as a noncaustic, antiseptic hemostatic in den- tistry. Dose 5-8 gr. (0.3-0.5 Gm.).
  • Ferrovin (fer'-o-vin). A readily absorbable iron preparation, used in anemia.
  • Ferruginated (fer-u' '-jin-a-ted) . Having the properties of iron.
  • Ferruginous (fer-u' -jin-us) (ferrum). 1. Chaly- beate. 2. Having the color of iron-rust.
  • Fersan (fer f -san). A proprietary food -product made from the red corpuscles of beef -blood.
  • Fertile (jer'-til) (jcrtilis, fruitful). Prolific; fruitful.
  • Fertilization (fer-til-i-za' -shun) (fertile). The art of making fertile ; impregnation.
  • Ferula (fer'-u-lah) (L.). A genus of the order Umbelliferce. See Asafetida and Galbanum.
  • Fester (fes'-ter) (ME.). 1. To suppurate. 2. An ulcer.
  • Festination (fes-tin-a 1 '-shun) (jestinare, to hasten). A gait that increases in rapidity; it is seen in paralysis agitans.
  • Fetal (fe'-tal) (fetus). Pertaining to the fetus. F. Markings, furrows and embryonic mark- ings found in the adult kidney.
  • Fetation (fe-ta' -shun) (fetus). 1. The formation of a fetus. 2. Pregnancy.
  • Feticide (fe'-tis-id) (fetus; ccedere, to kill). The killing of the fetus in the womb.
  • Fetus (fe'-tus) (fcetus, offspring). The unborn offspring of viviparous animals in the later stages of development.
  • Fiat, Fiant (fi'-at, fi'-ant) (pres. subj., third person, sing, and pi., of fieri, to be made). Let there be made.
  • Fibriform (fib' -ri-form) (fiber; forma, shape). Shaped like a fiber.
  • Fibrillar (fi'-bril-ar) (fibril). Pertaining to fibrils. F. Contractions, spontaneous con- tractions successively taking place in different bundles of muscular fibers; they are seen in pro- gressive muscular atrophy and other diseases.
  • Fibrillary (fi'-bril-a-re). Same as Fibrillar.
  • Fibrillation (fi-bril-a' '-shun) (fiber). A local- ized quivering of muscular fibers.
  • Fibrino- (fi-brin-o-) (fibrin). A prefix meaning relating to fibrin.
  • Fibrinogen (ft-brin' '-o-jen) (fibrino-; ysvvav, to produce). A proteid of the globulin class, ob- tained from blood-plasma and serous trans- udations. It is one of the chief elements in the formation of fibrin, Fibrinogenous (fi-brin-o f-en-us) (see Fibrino- gen). Forming or producing fibrin.
  • Fibrinoglobulin (fi - brin -0 - glob'- u - lin) . See Fibrin- globulin.
  • Fibrinolysis (fi-brin-oV -is-is) (fibrino-; Xbecv, to loose). The partial dissolution which takes place in fibrin if allowed to stand in con- tact with the blood from which it was formed.
  • Fibrinoplastic (fi-brin-o-plas'-tik)(fibrino-; nXaa- oecv, to form). Of the nature of fibrinoplastin.
  • Fibrinoplastin (fi - brin - o - plas' - tin). See Par a globulin.
  • Fibrinous (fi'-brin-us) (fibrin). Of the nature of or containing fibrin.
  • Fibrinuria (fi-brin-u' -re-ah) (fibrin; ovpov, urine). Chyluria in which the urine coagu- lates spontaneously.
  • Fibro fatty (fi-bro-fat'-e). Consisting of fibrous tissue and fat-corpuscles.
  • Fibro- (fi-bro-) (fiber). A prefix signifying rela- tion to fibers or to fibrous tissue.
  • Fibroadenoma (fi-bro-ad-en-o' -mah) . Adeno- ma having fibrous tissue.
  • Fibroareolar (fi-bro-ar-e'-o-lar) (fibro-; areola). Containing fibrous tissue with an areolar arrangement.
  • Fibroblast (fi'-bro-blast) (fibro-; ^Xaorog, a germ), A cell that forms new fibrous tissue.
  • Fibrocalcareous (fi-bro-kal-ka' -re-us) . Ap- plied to fibrous tumors which have undergone calcareous degeneration.
  • Fibrocartilage (fi-bro-kar'-til-aj) (fibro-; carti- lage). Cartilage with an intermixture of fibrous elements.
  • Fibrocellular (fi-bro-sel' -u-lar) (fibro-; cellular). Both fibrous and cellular; fibroareolar.
  • Fibrochondritis (fi-bro-kon-dri' -tis) (fibro-; %ov- dpoc~, cartilage; crcc, inflammation). Inflam- mation of fibrocartilage.
  • Fibroconnective (fi-bro-kon-ek'-tiv) . Having a fibrous structure and the function of con- necting.
  • Fibrocyst (fi'-bro-sist) (fibro-; kuouc, a cyst). A fibroma that has undergone cystic degenera- tion.
  • Fibrocystic (fi-bro-sist'-ik). Fibrous and hav- ing undergone cystic degeneration.
  • Fibrocystoid (fi-bro-sisf -oid) . Having the structure of a fibrocyst.
  • Fibrocystoma (fi-bro-sist-o'-mah). Fibroma combined with cystoma.
  • Fibroglioma (fi-bro-gli-o'-mah) (fibro-; glioma). A tumor having the elements of a fibroma and a glioma.
  • Fibroidectomy (fi-broid-ek' -to-me) (fibroid; inTOfir), excision). Excision of a uterine fibroid. FIBROLAMINAR 420 FILAMENT Fibrolaminar (fi-bro-lam'-in-ar). Relating to a fibrous layer.
  • Fibrolipoma (fi-bro-lip-o' -mah) (fibro-; lipoma). A tumor of fibrous and fatty tissue.
  • Fibroma (fi-bro' -mah) (fibro-; b/ia, a tumor). A benign tumor composed of fibrous tissue. F., Hard, one containing few cells, being chiefly composed of fibers. F. lipomatodes. Same as Xanthoma. F. molluscum. Syn- onym of Molluscum fibrosum. F., Soft, one rich in cells.
  • Fibromatosis (fi-bro-mat'-o-sis). See Fibrosis.
  • Fibromatous (fi-bro' -mat-us). Relating to a fibroma.
  • Fibromucous (fi - bro - mu' - kus) . Consisting partly of mucosa and partly of fibrous tissue.
  • Fibromuscular (fi-bro-mus'-hu-lar). Made up of connective tissue and muscle.
  • Fibromyoma (fi-bro-mi-o' -man) (fibro-; myoma), A tumor composed of fibrous and muscular tissue.
  • Fibromyomotomy (fi -bro -mi -o -mot' ' -o- me) (fibromyoma; zk^vecv, to cut). The surgical removal of a fibromyoma.
  • Fibromyxo sarcoma (fi - bro -miks -o - sar-ho'- mah). i. A tumor containing sarcomatous and myxoid tissue. 2. A fasciculated sar- coma which has undergone myxoid degenera- tion.
  • Fibromyxoma (fi-bro -miks-o' -mah) (fibro-; myxoma). A tumor composed of fibrous and myxomatous tissue.
  • Fibroneuroma (fi-bro-nu-ro' -mah) (fibro-; neu- roma). A tumor composed of fibrous tissue and nerve-fibers.
  • Fibronuclear, Fibronucleated (fi-bro-nu'- kle-ar, -nu' -kle-a-ted) . Relating to tissue which shows many nuclei and fibers.
  • Fibropericarditis (fi-bro-per-e-kar-di' '-lis) . Fi- brinous pericarditis.
  • Fibroplastic (fi-bro-plas'-tik) (fibro-; nlaoaztv, to form). Tending to form fibers.
  • Fibropsammoma (fi-bro-sam-o'-mah). See Psammoma.
  • Fibroreticulate (fi-bro-re-tik' '-u-lat) . Consist- ing of a fibrous network or marked with interlacing fibers.
  • Fibrosarcoma (fi-bro -sar-ko 1 '-mah) (fibro-; sar- coma). A sarcoma containing fibrous tissue. F., Mucocellular (of the ovary), a form marked by a layer of large, round, bladdery cells lying between the fibrils of the con- nective tissue.
  • Fibrous (fi'-brus) (fiber). Containing fibers; of the character of fibrous tissue.
  • Fibula (fib'-u-lah) (L., "a buckle"). 1. The slender bone at the outer part of the leg, articulating above with the tibia and below with the astragalus and tibia. Syn., Perone. 2. A clasp serving to unite the edges of a wound or the opening of a canal.
  • Ficiform (fis'-e-form) (ficus; forma, form). Fig- shaped.
  • Ficus (fi'-kus) (L., "a fig-tree"). The fig. The ficus of the U. S. P. is the partially dried fruit of F. carica, native of Asia Minor, and cultivated throughout Europe and tropical America. It is laxative and nutritious, and is a constituent of confectio sennae.
  • Figurate (fig' -u-rat) . Having a fixed and definite shape; arranged in a definite shape: said of skin eruptions.
  • Figwort (fig'-wert). The herb Scrophularia nodosa, an alterative, diuretic, and anodyne. It is sometimes used in the form of an oint- ment for piles. Dose of the fiuidextract ^-i dr. (2-4 Cc).
  • Filaceous (fi-la' -she-us) (filum, a thread). Consisting of threads or thread-like fibers or parts.
  • Filariasis (fil-ar-i'-as-is) (filaria). A diseased state due to the presence in the body of Filaria. sanguinis-hominis or allied species.
  • Filicic Acid (fil'-is-ik). An acid, C 14 H 16 5 , extracted from Aspidium filix-mas.
  • Filicism (fil r -e-sizm) . Poisoning from over- dosage of extract of male-fern.
  • Filiform (fil'-i-form) (filum, a thread; forma, form). Thread-like. F. Bougie. See Bougie, Filiform. F. Papillas, the smallest and most numerous of the papillas of the tongue, occurring over its whole surface.
  • Filipuncture (fil-e-punk' -chur) (filum, a, thread; punctura, a puncture). A method of treating aneurysm by inserting wire threads, hair, or the like to promote coagulation.
  • Filix (fi'-liks) (L.). A fern. F.-mas, male- fern. See Aspidium.
  • Filmogen (fil'-mo-jen). A protective vehicle for applying medicaments in skin diseases, consisting of pyroxylin dissolved in acetone with a small quantity of castor-oil.
  • Filtrate (fil'-trat) (filter). The liquid that has passed through a filter.
  • Filtration (fil-tra' -shun) (filter). The oper- ation of straining through a filter.
  • Filtrum (fil'-trum) (L., "felt"; pi., filtra). 1. Felt. 2. A filter or strainer. Filtra ven- triculi, small vertical channels on the back of the larynx between Morgagni's cartilage and the inner edge of the arytenoid cartilage. They end between the vocal bands at the dorsal end of Morgagni's ventricle.
  • Filum terminale (fi'-lum ter-min-a'-le). A long, slender thread of pia mater, the termi- nation of the spinal cord.
  • Fimbria (fim'-bre-ah) (L., "a fringe"). A fringe. F. of Fallopian Tube, the fringe- like process of the outer extremity of the oviduct.
  • Fimbriated (fim' -bre-a-ted) (fimbria). Fringed.
  • Fimbriatum (fim-bre-a'-tum) (fimbria). The corpus fimbriatum.
  • Fir (fur). See Abies. F., Balsam-. See Abies balsamea.
  • Fission (fish'-un) (fissus; findere, to cleave). Reproduction by splitting into two or more equal parts.
  • Fissiparous (fis-ip' -ar-us) (fission; parere, to produce). Propagating by fission.
  • Fissura (fish-u'-rah) (L.). A fissure.
  • Fistulous (fis'-tu-lus) (fistula). Of the nature of or affected with a fistula.
  • Fixative (fiks'-a-tiv). 1. Applied to any sub- stance used to fix tissues in the structural condition and shape found in life or for fastening a microscopic section to a slide. 2. See Body, Immune.
  • Fixing (fiks'-ing). The preparation of tissue for microscopic study by means of some agent that hardens it and preserves the form and arrangement of the cells.
  • Flabellum (fla-bel' -urn) (L., "fan"). A group of divergent fibers in the corpus striatum.
  • Flaccid (flak' '-sid) (flaccus, flaccid). Soft; flabby; relaxed.
  • Flagellate (flaj' -el-at) (flagellum). Furnished with slender, whip-like processes.
  • Flagellum (flaj-el'-um) (L., "a whip"). A whip-like, mobile process; the organ of loco- motion of certain bacteria and infusoria.
  • Flank (flank) (ME., flank, from L., flaccus, FLAP 423 FLOOR soft). The part of the body between the ribs and the upper border of the ilium.
  • Flatness (flal'-nes) (flat). The sound obtained by percussing over an airless organ or a large effusion.
  • Flatulence (flat' '-u-lens) (flatus). A condition marked by the presence of gas in the stomach and intestinal canal.
  • Flatulent (flat' -u-lent) (flatus). Characterized by flatulence.
  • Flatus (fla'-tus) (L.). Gas, especially gas in the gastrointestinal canal.
  • Flavopurpurin (flav-o-pur' -pu-rin) (flavus, yellow; purpura, purple), C u H 8 O s . A pig- ment occurring in golden-yellow, acicular crystals.
  • Flax (flaks). See Linum. F.-dresser's Phthisis, a fibroid pneumonia resulting from the inhalation of particles in flax- dressing.
  • Flaxseed (flak'-sed). See Linum.
  • Fleabane (fle' -ban). See Erigeron.
  • Fleam (flem) ((fiXeftorofiov, a lancet; from (f>Xiip, a vein; zepLvecv, to cut). A phlebotome; a lancet for venesection.
  • Fleming's Tincture. An alcoholic prepara- tion of aconite stronger than the official tincture. Dose 2 min. (0.13 Cc).
  • Flex (fleks) (fleeter e, to bend). To bend.
  • Flexibilitas (fleks-ib-il'-.it-as) (L.). Flexibility. F. cerea, a condition of the limbs in catalepsy in which they seem as if made of wax.
  • Flexible (fleks'-e-M) (flex). That which may be bent, as a flexible catheter, flexible collo- dion.
  • Flexion (flek'-shun) (flex). The act of bending; the condition of being bent.
  • Flexor (fleks'-or) (flex). A muscle that bends or flexes a limb or a part. See under Mus- cle.
  • Floating (flo'-ting) (AS., fleotan, to float). Swimming; free to move around. F. Kid- ney, one that is detached from its normal position and abnormally movable. F. Liver, one with abnormal mobility; movable liver. F. Rib. See Rib. Floating.
  • Floccitation (flok-sit-a' -shun) . Same as Carph- ology.
  • Flocculence (flok' -u-lens) (see Flocculus). Flakiness; the state of being flocculent.
  • Flocculent (flok'-u-lent) (see Flocculus). Flaky, downy, or woolly; coalescing in flocky masses.
  • Flocculus (flok'-u-lus) (dim. of floccus, a flock of wool; pi., flocculi). 1. A prominent lobe of the cerebellum situated behind and below the middle cerebellar peduncle on each side of the median fissure. 2. A small flock of wool or something resembling it; a tuft, shred, or flake.
  • Flooding (flud'-ing) (AS., flod, a flood). A copious bleeding from the uterus.
  • Floor (flor) (ME.). The basal limit of any hollow organ or open space. F.- cells, those found in the floor of Corti's arch. F. of the Pelvis, the united mass of FLORENCE'S CRYSTALS 424 FLUX tissue forming the inferior boundary of the pelvis.
  • Flore S (flo'-rez) (pi. of flos, a flower), i. The flowers or blossoms of a plant. 2. A floccu- lent or pulverulent form assumed by certain substances after sublimation, as flores sul- phur is, flowers of sulfur.
  • Flow (flo) (AS., flowan, to flow). The free discharge of a liquid, as the blood; the menses.
  • Flower (flow'-er) . See Flores.
  • Flucticuli (fluk-tik' -u-li) (pi. of flucticulus, a wavelet). Bergmann's name for the fine, wave-like markings on the surface of the lateral wall of the third ventricle, ventrad of the anterior commissure.
  • Fluctuation (fluk-tu-a' -shun) (fluctuare, to float or roll). The wave-like motion pro- duced when a body containing fluid is tapped between the fingers or hands.
  • Fluidextract (flu-id-ek r -strakt). A solution of the solid principles of a vegetable drug, of such strength that 1 Gm. of the drug is fully represented by 1 Cc. of the fluidextract.
  • Fluidounce (flu-id-owns'). A liquid measure; eight fluidrams.
  • Fluidram (flu-id-ram') . A liquid measure equal to 56.96 grains of distilled water.
  • Fluke (fluk) (ME., floke). Any trematode worm. Flumen (flu' -men) (L.; pi., flumena). 1. A flow. 2. A name given by Duret to the principal cerebral fissures.
  • Fluor albus (flu' -or al'-bus) (L., "a white flow"). Leukorrhea.
  • Fluorescence (flu-or-es' -ens) (fluor (fluor-spar), because first observed in this mineral). A property possessed by certain substances of converting obscure actinic rays, such as the ultraviolet, into luminous rays.
  • Fluorescent (flu-or-es' -ent). Having the pro- perty of fluorescence. F. Screen, a screen covered with substances which become fluorescent on exposure to the roentgen-rays.
  • Fluorid (flu'-or-id) (see Fluorin). A com- pound of fluorin and a base.
  • Fluorin (flu' -or-in) (fluor-spar), F= 19; quan- tivalence I. An element belonging to the chlorin group. Its intense chemic affinity has so far rendered its isolation impossible. The salts formed with the alkaline metals, fluorids, have been used in goiter and in rheumatism. See Elements, Table 0 Chemic.
  • Fluoroform (flu-or'-o-form) (fluorin; forma, form), CHF 3 . A gas, the fluorin analog of chloroform. F. -water (aqua fluoroformii), a watery solution (2.8%) of fluoroform, used in tuberculosis and lupus. Dose 1 table- spoonful 4 times daily. Syn., Fluoroformol.
  • Fluoroformol (flu-or-o-form'-ol). See Fluor o- form-water .
  • Fluorol (flu'-or-ol), NaF. Sodium fluorid, an antiseptic.
  • Fluorometer (flu-or-om' -et-er) (fluorescence, fifrpov, a measure). A device for adjusting the shadow in skiagraphy; a localizer in roentgen-ray examination.
  • Fluoroscope (flu'-or-os-kop) (fluorescence ; a Kone'cv, to examine). The instrument for holding the fluorescent screen in roentgen-ray exami- nation.
  • Fluoroscopy (flu-or-os' -ko-pe) . The process of examining the tissues by means of a fluores- cent screen.
  • Fluorrheumin (flu-or-ru'-min). The com- mercial name of fluorphenetol-difluorodi- phenyl, prepared as an ointment and used in the treatment of rheumatism. Dose 77 gr. (5 Gm.) externally.
  • Foetal (fe'-tal).- See Fetal.
  • Foetus (fe'-tus) . See Fetus.
  • Fogging Maneuver. In repression treatment of esophoria, the reduction of vision to about go by combining prisms (varying with the muscular imbalance), bases in, with a convex sphere, with which combination glasses the patient reads a half-hour at night before retiring.
  • Folia (fo'-le-ah) (folium, leaf). Leaves.
  • Follicular (fol-ik' -u-lar) (jollicle). Pertaining to a follicle.
  • Folliculitis (fol-ik-u-li f -tis) (jollicle; exec, inflam- mation). Inflammation of a group of follicles. F. barbae. See Sycosis parasitaria. F. de- calvans. See Acne decalvans.
  • Folliculoma (fol-ik-u-lo'-mah). A tumor orig- inating in a follicle. F. ovarii malignum, a malignant tumor of a graafian vesicle.
  • Folliculose (fol-ik'-u-los) (follicle). Full of follicles.
  • Folliculosis (fol-ik-u-lo'-sis). A disease of the follicles.
  • Fomentation (fo-men-ta' -shun) (fomentare, to foment). 1. The application of heat and moisture to a part to relieve pain or reduce inflammation. It may be made by means of cloths soaked in hot water or medicated solution or by a poultice. 2. The substance applied to a part to convey heat or mois- ture.
  • Fomes (fo'-mez) (L., "tinder"; pi., fomites). Any substance capable of acting as the medium for transmitting contagion.
  • Fomites (fo'-mi-tez). Plural of Fomes.
  • Fontanel, Fontanelle (jon-tan-eV) (Fr., fon- tanelle, a little fountain). A membranous space between the cranial bones in fetal life and infancy. F., Anterior, that at the point Fontanels of Fetal Skull.
  • Fonticulus (jon-tik'-u-lus) (dim. of fons, a fountain), i. A fontanel. 2. An issue.
  • Forage (for'-aj) (OF., fourage). Fodder. F.- poisoning, the preferred term for the socalled epizootic cerebrospinal meningitis of horses. It is attributed to a fungus upon the ensi- lage.
  • Foraminulate, Foraminulous, Foraminu- lose (for-am-in'-u-lat, -lus, -Ids). Furnished with very minute openings.
  • Force (fors) (fortis, strong). That which pro- duces or arrests motion. F., Absolute Mus- cular, the maximum capacity of shortening shown by a muscle subjected to maximum stimulus. F., Electromotive, the force pro- ducing an electric current. F., Plastic, the generative force of the body.
  • Forcipal () or' -sip -at). Relating to forceps.
  • Forcipressure (for' -se- presh - iir) (forceps; pressura, a pressing). The catching the end of the divided vessel with a pair of spring-forceps, which are left on for some time for the purpose of preventing hemor- rhage.
  • Fore (for) (AS.). In front; coming first. F. -brain, the anterior of the encephalic vesicles into which the primary nervous axis of the embryo divides at an early stage; the prosencephalon. F.-gut, the embry- onic tube corresponding to the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.
  • Forearm (for' -arm). That part of the arm between the wrist and the elbow.
  • Forefinger (for'-fing-er). The index-finger.
  • Foregilding (for' -gild-ing) . A term designating the histologic process of treating perfectly fresh nerve tissues with salts. Cf. After- gilding.
  • Forehead (for'-ed). That part of the face above the orbits.
  • Forensic (for-en'-sik) (forensis, belonging to the forum). Pertaining to a court of law. In medicine, that part of the science con- nected with judicial inquiry.
  • Foreskin (for' -skin). The prepuce.
  • Formacoll (for'-mak-ol). See Formaldehyd- gelatin.
  • Formagen (f or' -ma j -en). A proprietary dental cement.
  • Formal (for'-mal). See Methylal.
  • Formalbumin (for-mal'-bu-min). See For- maldehyd-casein .
  • Formalin (for 1 -mal-in) (formica, an ant). A proprietary substance composed of a 40% solution of formaldehyd. It is used as an antiseptic and as a fixing-agent in histologic studies.
  • Formalith (for' -mal-ith) . The proprietary name for diatomaceous earth saturated with a solution of formaldehyd.
  • Formalose (for' -mal-os) . A 40% solution of formaldehyd.
  • Formamid (for' -mam-id), CH 3 NO. One of the amids.
  • Forman (for' -man). See Ether, Chlormethyl- menthyl-.
  • Formate (for' -mat). A salt of formic acid.
  • Formatio (for-ma'-she-o) (L.). A formation. F. reticularis, the intercrossing of the fibers of the anterior columns in the medulla.
  • Formation (for -ma' -shun) (formatio). A thing formed or the process by which it is formed.
  • Formative (for' -ma-tiv) (formatio). Concerned in the formation of tissue.
  • Formatol (for'-mat-ol) . A dusting-powder con- taining formaldehyd.
  • Formes frustes (form frist) (Fr.). Incomplete forms of Graves' disease.
  • Formic, Formicic (for' - mik, for - mis' - ik) (formica, an ant). Relating to or derived from ants, or pertaining to formic acid. F. Acid. See Acid, Formic.
  • Formication (for-mik-a' -shun) (see Formic). A sensation like that produced by ants or other insects crawling upon the skin.
  • Formin (for'-min), C 6 H 12 N 4 . A condensation- product of formaldehyd and ammonia; it is a uric-acid solvent, diuretic, and vesical antiseptic. Dose 15-24 gr. (1. 0-1.5 Gm.) in the morning in aqueous solution. Syn., FORMOCHLOR 429 FOSSA Hexamethylenetetramin; Urotropin. F. Sali- cylate. See Saliformin.
  • Formochlor (form' '-o-klor) . A solution of formaldehyd and calcium chlorid. It is used as a disinfectant by spraying or vaporizing.
  • Formoforin, Formoform (form -o- for' -in, form'-o-form). A dusting-powder for per- spiring feet; said to consist of formaldehyd, 0.13%; thymol, 0.1%; zinc oxid, 34.44%; and starch, 65.27%. If the formaldehyd is omitted, it may be used on purulent sores.
  • Formol (form'-ol). See Formalin.
  • Formomethylal (form-o-meth'-il-al), C 3 H g O. An ethereal oil obtained from the distillation of a mixture of methyl-alcohol, sulfuric acid, and manganese peroxid. It is anesthetic.
  • Formonitril (form-o-ni' -tril). Hydrocyanic acid.
  • Formopyrin (form-o-pi'-rin). A combination of antipyrin with formaldehyd.
  • Formulary (form'-u-la-re) (formula'). A collec- tion of formulas or recipes. F., National, a collection of widely used and well-known pre- parations, omitted from the United States Pharmacopeia, but collected and published by the American Pharmaceutic Association.
  • Fornical (for'-nik-al). Relating to the fornix.
  • Fornicate (for'-nik-dt) (fornix). Arched. F. Gyrus. See Convolution, Fornicate.
  • Fortification-spectra (for-tif-ik-a-shun-spek'- trah). Scotoma scintillans (q. v.).
  • Fortoin (for'-to-in). See Formaldehyd-cotoin.
  • Fossula (fos-u'-lah) (dim. of fossa, a ditch), A small fossa; any one of the numerous slight depressions on the surface of the cerebrum.
  • Fothergill's Disease. Neuralgia of the trigem- inus. F.'s Sore Throat, the ulcerative angina of severe scarlatina (scarlatina anginosa).
  • Foudroyant (foo-droi-on(t) ) (Fr.). Sudden and overwhelming; fulminant; fulgurant.
  • Fourchet, Fourchette (foor-shet') (dim. of fourche, a fork). 1. A fold of mucous mem- brane just inside the posterior commissure of the vulva. 2. A forked instrument used in division of the frenum linguae.
  • Foveate (fo'-ve-at) (fovea). Pitted.
  • Foveolate (fo-ve'-o-lat). Marked with slight depressions, dimples, or pits.
  • Foxglove (foks'-gluv). See Digitalis .
  • Fraenkel's Glands. See Glands, Fraenkel's. F.'s Leukemia, acute leukemia with large mono- nuclear lymphocytes. F.'s Sign, diminished tone (hypotonic) of the muscles of the lower extremities in tabes dorsalis.
  • Fragiform (fraf '-e-form) \jraga, strawberries; forma, form). Strawberry-shaped.
  • Fragilitas (fraj-il'-it-as) (L.). Brittleness. F. crinium, an atrophic condition of the hair in which the individual hairs split into num- erous fibrils. F. ossium, abnormal brittle- ness of the bones.
  • Fragmentation (frag-men-ta' -shun) (f ragmen- turn, a piece). The breaking up into frag- ments.
  • Frambesia (fram-be' -ze-ah) (framboise, rasp- berry). A tropical contagious disease of the skin, of long duration, characterized by dirty or bright-red, raspberry-like tubercles, appear- ing usually on the face, toes, and genital or- gans. It is most frequent in young negroes. Syn., Plan; Yaws.
  • Frangula (fran'-gu-lah) (L.). The bark of Rhamnus frangula, or alder-buckthorn. The young bark is very irritant; bark at least a year old is laxative, resembling rhubarb in action. F., Fluidextract of (fluidextractum frangula, U. S. P.). Dose 10-20 minj (0.65-1.3 Cc).
  • Frangulin (fran'-gu-lin), C^H^O^. A purga- tive glucosid from frangula. Dose 1^-3 gr. (0.097-0.19 Gm.).
  • Frankincense (frangk' -in-sens) (francum in- censum, pure incense). An aromatic gum- resin. See Olibanum. F., Common, a con- crete turpentine obtained from Pinus palustris and other species of Pinus.
  • Franklinization (frangk - lin - i - za' - shun) . Treatment by static or frictional electricity.
  • Frasera (fra'-ze-rah). The root of American calumba; it is a mild tonic and simple bitter. Dose in powder 1 dr. (4 Gm.).
  • Frasnulum (fren r -u-lum) . See Frenulum, FRENUM 432 FRIEDREICH'S ATAXIA Fraenum (fre'-num). See Frenum.
  • Fraxinus (fraks-in' -us) . See Manna.
  • Freckles (frek'-lz). See Lentigo.
  • Free in air. (Forms one- half the earth's crust, combined.) Native and with platin- um and gold.
  • Frenal (fre'-nal). Relating to the frenum.
  • Frenator (fre-na' '-tor) (frenare, to curb). 1. Anything that inhibits, curbs, or checks. 2. Dupre's name for any one of the muscles which move the head on the atTas and axis.
  • Frenulum (fren' -u-lum) (dim. of frenum, a bridle). A small frenum; a slight ridge on the upper part of the valve of Vieussens. F. pudendi, the fourchet.
  • Frenum (fre'-num) (L., "a bridle"). A fold of integument or mucous membrane that checks or limits the movements of any organ. F. linguae, the vertical fold of mucous membrane under the tongue. F. praeputii, F. of Penis, * the fold on the lower surface of the glans penis connecting it with the prepuce.
  • Frenzy (fren'-ze) ((f>prjv, mind). Violent mania.
  • Fretum (fre'-tum) (L., "a strait"). 1. A con- striction. 2. A strait; a channel.
  • Freund's Law. In the progress of their growth ovarian tumors undergo changes of position: (1) While pelvic, they show a tendency to grow downward behind the uterus; (2) when they have risen out of the pelvis, they tend to fall forward toward the abdominal wall.
  • Friable (fri'-ab-l) (friare, to break into pieces). Easily broken or crumbled.
  • Friars' Balsam (fri'-arz bawl'-sam). The com- pound tincture of benzoin.
  • Friction (frik'-shun) (fricare, to rub). The act of rubbing. F. -fremitus. See Fremitus, Fric- tion-. F. -sound, the sound observed in auscul- tation as a result of the rubbing together of adjacent parts, e. g., of the pleural folds, the pericardium, or the peritoneum, when the layers are dry or roughened.
  • Fright (frit) (ME., frizi). Sudden and extreme fear. F. -neuroses, certain neuro- mimetic disorders following injury; generally considered under the name of "traumatic hysteria." F., Precordial, the precordial sen- sations of anxiety felt immediately before an attack of melancholic frenzy.
  • Frigorific (frig-or-if -ik) (frigus, cold; facer e, to make). Producing extreme cold.
  • Frigotherapy (frig-o-ther' '-ap-e) (jrigus; depa- ne'ca, therapy). The treatment of disease by cold.
  • Frontad (front' -ad) (front; ad, to). Toward the frontal aspect.
  • Fronto- (fron-to-) (jrons, forehead). A prefix denoting anterior position or expressing a relation with the forehead.
  • Frontomalar (fron-to-ma' -lar) . Relating to the frontal and to the malar bones. F. Suture. See Suture, Frontomalar.
  • Frontomaxillary (fron-to-mak'-sil-a-re). Re- lating to the frontal bone and the upper jaw bones.
  • Frontomental (fron-to -men' -taV). Running from the top of the forehead to the point of the chin or relating to the forehead and chin. 29 Frontonuchal (fron-to-nu'-chal). Relating to the forehead and the nape of the neck.
  • Frontoparietal (fron-to-pa-ri'-e-tal). Relating to the frontal and parietal bones.
  • Frontotemporal (fron-to-tem' -po-ral) . Relat- ing to the frontal and temporal bones.
  • Frosted Feet (fros'-ted). See Chilblain.
  • Fructose (fruk'-tos). See Levulose.
  • Fruit (frut) (fructus, fruit). 1. The developed ovary of a plant, and especially the succulent, fleshy parts gathered about the same. 2. The offspring of animals. F. -sugar. See Levu- lose.
  • Frumentum (fru-men' -turn) (L.). Wheat or other grain. Frumenti, Spiritus (U. S. P.), whisky.
  • Fuchsinophil (fook-sin' -o-fll) (fuchsin; th1v, to love). Stainable with fuchsin.
  • Fucus (fu'-kus) (°TVy flight). Arresting the secretion of milk.
  • Galactoplania (gal-ak-to-pla' -ne-ah) (gala-; Tzlav-q, a wandering). The metastasis of milk; a disease due to the suppression of lactation and the metastasis of the milk.
  • Galactopoietic (gal -ak-to- poi -et' - ik) (gala-; rcocelv, to make). Galactagog.
  • Galactoposia (gal-ak-to-po' -ze-ah) (gala-; noocc, drinking). The treatment of diseases by the use of a milk-diet; the milk -cure.
  • Galactopyretus (gal-ak-to-pi-re'-tus) (gala-; KOpsroc, fever). Milk-fever.
  • Galactorrhea (gal-ak-tor-e'-ah) (gala-; po'ca, a flow). An excessive flow of milk.
  • Galactoscope (gal-ak' -to-skop) . See Lactoscope.
  • Galactose (gal-ak' -to s) (yaXa, milk), C 6 H 12 O e . A sugar formed by boiling milk-sugar with dilute acids. It readily reduces alkaline cop- per solutions and is fermentable with yeast.
  • Galactosis (gal-dk-to' -sis) (yaXaKrajocc'). The secretion of nilk.
  • Galactostasis (gal-ak-tos'-tas-is) (gala-; oxaotg, stoppage). A stoppage of the milk.
  • Galactotherapy (gal-ak-to-ther' -ap-e) depaizrtv, treatment). 1. The treatment of disease in suckling infants by the ad- ministration of remedies to the mother or wet- nurse. 2. Milk-cure.
  • Galactotoxin (gal-ak-to-toks' -in) . A basic poison generated in milk by the growth of microorganisms. See Tyrotoxicon.
  • Galactotoxism (gal-ak-to-toks' -izm) (gala-; ro^c- kov, poison). Milk-poisoning.
  • Galactozymase (gal-ak-to-zi'-maz) (gala-; C^r), leaven). A ferment found in milk capable of liquefying starch.
  • Galanga, Galangal (gal-an'-gah, gal'-an-gal) (Chin.). The rhizome of Alpinia ofjicinarum and of Kcempferia galanga (greater galangal). The active principles are a volatile oil and a resin; the actions are those of a stimulant aromatic. Dose 15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.).
  • Galea (ga'-le-ah) (L., "helmet"). The aponeu- rotic portion of the occipitofrontalis muscle.
  • Gallacetophenone (gal-as-et-o-fe' '-non) (galla; acidum, acid; phenone), CH 3 CO . C 6 - H 2 (OH) 3 . A yellow powder prepared from pyrogallic acid; used as a 10% ointment in dermatology.
  • Gallanilid (gal-an' -il-id) . See Gallanol.
  • Gallanol (gal'-an-ol), C 13 H n 4 N + 2ll 2 0. The anilid of gallic acid obtained by boiling tannin with anilin; used in skin diseases in 3 to 20% ointment, or as a dusting-powder when mixed with French chalk.
  • Gallate (gal' -at). A salt of gallic acid.
  • Gallianin (gal-e' -an-in) . A fluid consisting of 4 parts by volume of ozone dissolved in part of an indifferent vehicle. It is used in veterinary surgery, in heat-stroke, acute pneumonia, etc.
  • Gallic Acid (gal'-ik). See Acid, Gallic.
  • Gallicin (gal'-is-in), C 6 H 2 (OH) 3 COOCH s . A methyl ether of gallic acid; recommended as a dusting-powder.
  • Gallinol (gal' -in-ol) . See Gallanol.
  • Gallipot (gal'-e- pot) (OD., gleypot). An apothecary's pot for holding ointments or confections.
  • Gallobromol (gal-o-bro'-mol), C 7 Br 2 5 H 4 . A compound obtained from bromin by action of gallic acid; it is sedative, antiseptic, and astringent. Dose 30-45 gr. (2-3 Gm.) a day. Application in 1 to 4% solution or paste.
  • Galloformin (gal-o-form' -in) . A compound of formaldehyd and gallic acid; used as an internal antiseptic.
  • Gallol (gal'-ol). See Aluminium Gallate, Basic.
  • Gallon (gal'-on) (ME., galon). A standard unit of volumetric measurement, having in the United States a capacity of 231 cubic inches.
  • Galtah, Galtia (gal'-tah, gal'-she-ah) (gala, throat, as galtah is a form of surra in camels, in which the throat affection is one of the prominent symptoms). Vernacular term in India for trypanosomiasis.
  • Galvanic (gal-van' -ik) (Galvani, an Italian scientist). Pertaining to galvanism. G. Battery. See Battery, Galvanic.
  • Galvanism (gal' -van-izm) (see Galvanic), Pri- mary electricity produced by chemic action.
  • Galvanization (gal-van-iz-a'-shun) (see Gal- vanic). The transmission of a current of low electromotive force through any part of the body for the purpose of diagnosticating or curing disease.
  • Galvano cautery (gal-van-o-kaw'-ter-e) . A form of thermal cautery in which the heat is pro- duced by a galvanic current.
  • Galvano- (gal-van-o-) (see Galvanic). A pre- fix denoting a galvanic or primary current of electricity.
  • Galvanocaustics (gal-van -o-kaws'-liks). The science of the caustic action of galvanism.
  • Galvanochemistry (gal-van-o-kem'-is-tre) . See Electrochemistry.
  • Galvanocontractility (gal-van -o-kon-trak-til'- it-e). The property of being contractile under stimulation by the galvanic current.
  • Galvanofaradization (gal - van -o -far -ad- i- za'-shun). The simultaneous excitation of a nerve or muscle by both a galvanic and a faradic current.
  • Galvanolysis (gal-van-oV -is-is) . See Electrol- ysis, Galvanometer (gal-van-om' -et-er) (galvano-; fiirpov, a measure). An instrument used for the qualitative determination of the presence of an electric current.
  • Galvanopuncture (gal - van - o - pungk'- tiir) . The introduction of fine needles that complete an electric circuit.
  • Galvanoscope (gal - van' - o - shop) (galvano-; oKOTitlv, to view). An instrument for detecting the presence and direction of a galvanic current.
  • Galvanoscopy (gal-van-os' -ko-pe) (see Galvano- scope). The use of the galvanoscope.
  • Galvanosurgery (gal-van-o-sur' -jer-e) . The surgical use of galvanism.
  • Galvanotherapeutics (gal - van - - ther - a - pu'-liks). Treatment by means of the galvanic current.
  • Galvanothermy (gal-van-o-ther'-me). The galvanic production of heat.
  • Galvanotonic (gal-van-o-ton'-ik). Both gal- vanic and tonic; relating to galvanotonus.
  • Galvanotonus (gal -van -of -on -us) (galvano-; xbvoc, tension). 1. Electrotonus. 2. The con- tinued tetanus of a muscle between the make and break contraction.
  • Gamboge (gam-bozh'). See Cambogia.
  • Gamete (gam'-et) (jo,p.kxt), wife). In biology, any sexual reproductive body.
  • Gammacism (gam' - as - izm) (gammacismus; yap.ua, the Greek letter G). Difficulty in pro- nouncing the letters " g" and "k" Gamogenesis (gam-o-)en' -es-is) (yajiof, mar- riage; jkvtocc, generation). Sexual repro- duction.
  • Gangliate, Gangliated (gan'-gle-dt, -ed). 1. Furnished with ganglions. 2. Intertwined or intermixed.
  • Gangliform (gan' '-gle-form) (ganglion; forma, form). Having the shape of a ganglion.
  • Gangliitis (gan-gle-V -tis) . See Ganglionitis.
  • Ganglioblast (gan 1 ' -gle-o-blast) (ganglion; ftXao- roc, a germ). An embryonic ganglion-cell. Syn., Esthesioblast.
  • Ganglioma (gan-gle-o' '-mah) (ganglion; ofta, tumor). A tumor or swelling of a lymphatic ganglion.
  • Ganglioneure, Ganglioneuron (gan-gle-o-nur' ', -nu'-ron) (ganglion; veupov, a nerve). A neuron the cell-body (nerve-cell) of which lies within the spinal or the cerebral ganglions.
  • Ganglionic (gan-gle-on f -ik) (ganglion'). Per- taining to or of the nature of a ganglion.
  • Ganglionica (gan-gle-on' -ik-ah) . Drugs affect- ing the sensibility of the regions supplied by the sympathetic nerve.
  • Ganglionitis (gan-gle-on-i'-tis) (ganglion; czeg, inflammation). Inflammation of a ganglion.
  • Gangrasna oris (gan-gre' -nah o'-ris). Cancrum oris (q. v.).
  • Gangrenous (gan'-gren-us) (gangrene). Per- taining to or of the nature of gan- grene. G. Emphysema. See Edema, Malig- nant.
  • Ganjah (gan'-jah). See Gunjah.
  • Garbled (gar'-bld) (OF., garbeler, to inspect closely). Applied to crude drugs which have been separated from worthless material and made ready for market.
  • Gardenin (gar-de' -nin) . A compound, C 23 H 30 - O l0 , obtained from Gardenia lucida.
  • Garget (gar' -get) (ME., gar gat, the throat), i. A swelling of the throat in swine or cattle. 2. A knotty condition of the udder in cows, attended with inflammation. Syn., Mam- mitis; Weed.
  • Gargle (gar'-gl) (OF., gargouiller, to gargle), i. A solution for rinsing the pharynx and nasopharynx. 2. To rinse the pharynx and nasopharynx.
  • Garlic (gar f -lik). See Allium.
  • Garofen (gar'-o-fen). A vegetable analgesic and antipyretic intended as a substitute for morphin and acetanilid.
  • Garrot (gar'-ot) (Fr., garrotter, to bind). An instrument for compression of an artery by twisting a circular bandage about the part.
  • Gaseous (gas'-e-us). Of the nature of a gas.
  • Gaskaral-H (gas' -kar-al) . A proprietary as- tringent and diuretic remedy. Dose if-2 oz. (50-60 Cc.) of the infusion (1 : 20). Syn., Aghara.
  • Gasometric (gas-o-met' -rik) . Relating to the measurement of gases.
  • Gasserectomy (gas-er-ek' -to-me) (gasserian gan- glion; EKTOfir), excision). Excision of the gas- serian ganglion.
  • Gasterasthenia (gas-ter-as-the'-ne-ah) (yaorfjp, stomach; asthenia). Debility of the stomach.
  • Gasterhysterotomy (gas-ter-his-ter-ot'-o-me) . See Gastrohysterotomy .
  • Gasteric (gas-ter'-ik). Same as Gastric.
  • Gasterin (gas'-ter-in). A preparation of the gastric juice of dogs; it is used as is pepsin.
  • Gastralgia (gas-tral' -je-ah) (gastro-; aXyoc, pain). Paroxysmal pain in the stomach.
  • Gastraneuria (gas-trah-nu'-re-ah) (gastro-; vsupov, a nerve). Impaired or defective action of the nerves of the stomach.
  • Gastraneurysma (gas-lra-nu-riz'-mah) . See Gastrectasis.
  • Gastrasthenia (gas-tras-the-ne'-ah). See Gas- terasthenia.
  • Gastratrophia (gas-tra-tro'-fe-ah) (gastro-; axpo'ca, atrophy). Atrophy of the stomach.
  • Gastrectasis (gas-trek' -tas-is) (gastro-; enxaote, a stretching out). Dilation of the stomach.
  • Gastrectomy (gas-trek' -to-me) (gastro-; iicTOfjnf), a cutting out). Excision of the whole or a part of the stomach.
  • Gastrelcoma (gas-lrel-ko'-mah) (gastro-; IXkoc, ulcer). A gastric ulcer. GASTRELCOSIS 441 GASTROENTEROPTOSIS Gastrelcosis (gas-trel-ko' -sis) (see Gastrel- coma). Ulceration of the stomach.
  • Gastro- (gas-tro-) (yaorrjp, stomach). A prefix denoting relation to the stomach.
  • Gastroadynamic (gas - tro - ah - din - am' - ik) (gastro-; adhvap-oc, without strength). Marked by gastric symptoms and prostration.
  • Gastroanastomosis (gas-tro-an-as-to-mo'-sis) (gastro-; anastomosis). In hour-glass contrac- tion, the formation of a communication be- tween the two pouches of the . stomach. Syn., Gastro gastrostomy.
  • Gastroataxic (gas-tro-ah-taks'-ik) . Character- ized by gastric symptoms and ataxia.
  • Gastroatonia (gas-tro-at-o' -ne-ah) . Atonic dys- pepsia.
  • Gastroblennorrhea (gas-tro-blen-or-e' -ah) . An excessive formation of mucus in the stomach. Gastrobrosis (gas-tro-bro'-sis) (gastro-; ftpaJotc, a gnawing). Perforating ulcer of the stomach.
  • Gastrocele (gas'-tro-sel) (gastro-; ki'jXt), hernia). A hernia of the stomach.
  • Gastrocnemius (gas-trok-ne r -me-us) . See under Muscle.
  • Gastrocolic (gas-tro-kol f -ik) (gastro-; koXov, the colon). Pertaining to the stomach and the colon. G. Omentum, the great omentum.
  • Gastrocolitis (gas-tro-ko-li'-tis) (gastro-; koXov, the colon; trie, inflammation). Inflammation of the stomach and colon.
  • Gastrocolostomy (gas-tro-ko-los' -to-me) (gastro-; koXov, the colon; oro/xa, mouth). The for- mation of a fistula between the stomach and colon.
  • Gastrocolpotomy (gas - tro - kol - pot' - o - me) (gastro-; koXtzoc, vagina; rqivecv, to cut). The operation of cesarean section in which the opening is made through the linea alba into the upper part of the vagina.
  • Gastrodiaphane (gas-tro-di' '-a -an) (gastro-; dta, through; acveiv, to show). A small electric light introduced into the stomach in gastro - diaphany.
  • Gastrodiaphany (gas-tro-di-af '-an-e) (see Gas- trodiaphane). A method of exploration of the stomach by means of an electric lamp.
  • Gastrodidymus (gas-tro-did' -im-us) (gastro-; d'idup.oc, double). A double monster with one abdominal cavity.
  • Gastroduodenal (gas-tro-du-od' -en-al) (gastro-; duodenum). Pertaining to the stomach and the duodenum.
  • Gastroduodenitis (gas-tro-du-od-en-i' -tis) (gas- tro-; duodenum; trig, inflammation). Inflam- mation of the stomach and duodenum.
  • Gastroduodenostomy (gas-tro-du-od-en-os' -to- me) (gastro-; duodenum; orofia, mouth). The surgical formation of a fistula between the stomach and duodenum.
  • Gastrodynia (gas-tro-din' -e-ah) (gastro-; doovq, pain). Pain in the stomach.
  • Gastroelytrotomy (gas-tro-el-it-rot'-o-me). See Gastrocolpotomy .
  • Gastroenteralgia (gas-tro -en-ter-aV '-je-ah) (gas- tro-; evrepov, bowel; aXyoc, pain). Pain in the stomach and bowel.
  • Gastroenteric (gas-tro-en-ter' -ik) (gastro-; evrepov, bowel). Pertaining to both stomach and bowel.
  • Gastroenteritis (gas-tro-en-ter-i'-tis) (gastro-; evrepov, bowel; crcc, inflammation). Inflam- mation of stomach and bowel.
  • Gastroenterocolitis (gas-tro-en-ter-o-kol-i'-tis) (gastro-; evrepov, bowel; koXov, colon; trcg, inflammation). Combined inflammation of the stomach, small intestine, and colon.
  • Gastroenterocolostomy (gas-tro-en-ter-o-ko- los'-to-me). The formation of a passage be- tween the stomach, small intestine, and colon.
  • Gastroenteropathy (gas-tro-en-ter-op'-ath-e) (gastro-; evrepov, bowel; TiaOog, disease). Any disease affecting the stomach and intestine.
  • Gastroenterotomy (gas-tro-en-ter-ot' -o-me) (gastro-; 'ivrspov, bowel; xkpvicv, to cut). Incision of the intestine through the abdomi- nal wall.
  • Gastroepiploic (gas-tro-ep-ip-lo'-ik) (gastro-; kit'cnXoov, caul). Pertaining to the stomach and omentum.
  • Gastrogastrostomy (gas-lro-gas-tros' -to-me) . The same as Gastroanastomosis.
  • Gastrograph (gas' -tro-graf) (gastro-; ypafyttv, to write). An apparatus for registering the peristaltic movements of the stomach from the outside. Syn., Gastrokineso graph.
  • Gastrohelcoma (gas-tro-hel-ko' -mah) . SeeGas- trelcoma.
  • Gastrohelcosis (gas-tro-hel-ko' -sis). See Gas- trelcosis.
  • Gastrohepatic (gas-tro-he-pat'-ik) (gastro-; fjnap, the liver). Relating to the stomach- and liver.
  • Gastrohepatitis (gas-tro-hep-at-i'-tis) (gastro-; hepatitis). Gastritis and hepatitis occurring simultaneously.
  • Gastrohyperneuria, Gastrohypernervia (gas- tro-hi-per-nu' -re-ah, -ner'-ve-ah) (gastro-; urckp, over; vsupov, a nerve). Morbid activity of the nerves of the stomach. Syn., Gastryper- neuria.
  • Gastrohypertonic (gas-tro-hi-per-ton'-ik) (gas- tro-; unip, over; xovoc, tone). Relating to morbid or excessive tonicity or irritability of the stomach.
  • Gastrohyponeuria, Gastrohyponervia (gas- tro-hi-po-nu' -re-ah, -ner'-ve-ah) (gastro-; bnb, under; vsupov, a nerve). Defective activity of the nerves of the stomach. Syn., Gastrypo- neuria.
  • Gastrohysterectomy (gas-tro-his-ter-ek' -to-me) (gastro-; hysterectomy). Removal of the uterus through the abdominal wall.
  • Gastrohysteropexy (gas-tr o-his'-ter-o-peks-e) (gastro-; uaxepa, the uterus; izfj^cc, a fasten- ing). Abdominal fixation of the uterus by a surgical operation.
  • Gastrohysterotomy (gas-tro-his-ter-ot'-o-me) (gastro-; uaxkpa, the uterus; Tkp.vs.iv, to cut). Incision of the uterus through the abdominal wall, usually for the purpose of removing a fetus; cesarean section.
  • Gastroid (gas'-troid) (gastro-; eldoc, likeness). Like a stomach.
  • Gastrointestinal (gas-tro-in-tes'-tin-al). See Gastroenteric.
  • Gastrojejunostomy (gas-tro-jej -u-nos' -to-me) (gastro-; jejunum; oxopa, mouth). The formation of a passage from the stomach to the jejunum.
  • Gastrolienal (gas-tro-W -en-al) . See Gastro- splenic.
  • Gastrolith (gas' -tro-lith) (gastro-; XWoc, a stone). A calcareous formation in the stomach.
  • Gastrolithiasis (gas-lro-lith-i' -as-is) (gastro- lith). A morbid condition associated with the formation of gastroliths.
  • Gastrologist (gas-troV -o-jist) (see Gastrology). A specialist in gastric disorders.
  • Gastrology (gas-troV -o-je) (gastro-; Xdyoc, science), i. A treatise on the stomach. 2. The sum of knowledge regarding the stomach and its diseases.
  • Gastrolysis (gas-trol' -is-is) (gastro-; Xuocf, a loosing). The breaking-up of adhesions be- tween the stomach and adjacent organs.
  • Gastromalacia (gas-tr o-mal-a' -she-ah) (gastro-; fiaXatcta, softening). An abnormal softening of the walls of the stomach.
  • Gastromegaly (gas-tro-meg' -al-e) (gastro-; peyaXfj, large). Abnormal enlargement of the stomach.
  • Gastromelus (gas-trom' -el-us) (gastro-; pkXog, a limb). A monster with accessory limbs at- tached to the abdomen.
  • Gastromenia (gas-tro-me' -ne-ah) (gastro-; p.i\v, month). Vicarious menstruation by the stomach.
  • Gastrometrotomy (gas-tro-met-rot'-o-me). See Laparohysterotomy.
  • Gastromucous (gas-tro-mu'-kus). Character- ized by gastric disturbance and abnormal secretion of mucus.
  • Gastromycosis (gas-tro-mi-ko'-sis) (gastro-; fi'JKTjC, fungus). Gastric disease due to in- vasion of fungi.
  • Gastromyeloma (gas-tr o-mi-e-lo' -mah) (gastro-; myeloma). A medullary sarcoma of the stomach.
  • Gastromyxin (gas-tro-miks'-in). A proprie- tary preparation of pepsin.
  • Gastronesteostomy (gas-tro-nes-te-os' -to-me) . See Gastrojejunostomy .
  • Gastroneuria, Gastronervia (gas-tro-nu' -re- ah, -ner'-ve-ah) (gastro-; veupov, nerve). The action of the nerves of the stomach.
  • Gastroomental (gas-tro-o-men' -tal) . See Gas- troepiploic.
  • Gastroparalysis (gas-tr -par -al' -is-is) (gastro-; paralysis). Paralysis of the stomach.
  • Gastroparietal (gas-tro-pa-ri' -et-al) (gastro-; parietal). 1. Relating to the stomach-wall. 2. Relating to the stomach and the abdominal wall.
  • Gastropathy (gas-trop' -ath-e) (gastro-; nadog, disease). Any disease or disorder of the stomach.
  • Gastroperiodynia (gas-tro-per-e-o-din' -e-ah) (gastro-; nzp'codoc, period; oduvq, pain). Periodic gastralgia.
  • Gastropexis, Gastropexy (gas-tr o-peks' -is, gas'-tro-peks-e) (gastro-; nfj^cc, a fixing). The fixation of a displaced stomach in its normal position by suturing it to the abdomi- nal wall.
  • Gastrophrenic (gas-tro-fren'-ik) (gastro-; <£>pr)v, diaphragm). Relating to the stomach and diaphragm. GASTROPLASTY 443 GAUZE Gastroplasty (gas-tro-plas'-te) (gastro-; Ttkaooetv, to form). Plastic operation on the stomach.
  • Gastroplegia (gas-tro-ple' -je-ah) (gastro-; nX-qy-q, stroke). Paralysis of the stomach.
  • Gastroplication (gas-tro-pli-ka' -shun) (gastro-; plicare, to fold). An operation for relief of chronic dilation of the stomach, consisting in suturing a large horizontal fold in the stomach-wall.
  • Gastroptosis (gas-tro-to' '-sis) (gastro-; ptosis). A prolapse or downward displacement of the stomach.
  • Gastropylorectomy (gas-tro-pi-lor-ek' -to-me) (gastro-; pylorus; iKrofiq, excision). Ex- cision of the pyloric portion of the stomach.
  • Gastrorrhagia (gas-tro-ra'- je-ah) (gastro-; pqyvovac, to break forth). Hemorrhage from the stomach.
  • Gastrorrhaphy (gas-tror'-a-fe) (gastro-; pa, the iodin being liberated and absorbed by copper. It is em- ployed by Niclaux to show normal presence of carbon monoxid in blood.
  • Gavage (gav-ahzh) (Fr.j. The administration of liquid nourishment through the stomach- tube.
  • Geisoma, Geison (ji-so'-mah, ji'-son) (ye'caov, anything projecting). The superciliary ridge of the frontal bone.
  • Gelanthum (jel-an'-thum). A mixture of gelatin, tragacanth, rose-water, and thymol recommended as an ointment -vehicle.
  • Gelatination (jet-at-in-a'-shun). See Gelifi- , cation.
  • Gelatinif erous (jel -at- in - if -er- us) (gelatin; ferre, to bear). Producing gelatin.
  • Gelatiniform (jel-at'-in-if-orm) (gelatin; forma, form). Resembling gelatin.
  • Gelatinize (jel-af -in-lz) (gelatin). To convert into a jelly-like mass.
  • Gelatinosa (jel-at-in-o'-sah). Wilder's term for the substantia gelatinosa.
  • Gelatinous (jel-af -in-us) (gelatin). Resem- bling or having the nature of gelatin.
  • Gelatol (jel'-at-ol). An ointment-base consist- ing of a mixture of oil, glycerol, gelatin, and water.
  • Gelatose (jel'-a-toz). A product of the action of gastric juice on gelatin. It is capable of osmosis. G. Silver. See Albargin.
  • Gelid (jel' -id) (gelidus, cold). Ice-cold.
  • Gelification (jel-if-i-ka'-shun). Gelatinization; the conversion of a substance into a jelly-like mass. Syn., Gelatination.
  • Gelose (jel'-oz) (gelare, to freeze). The gelatin- izing principle of agar.
  • Gelotherapy, Gelototherapy (jel-o-ther'-ap-e, jel-o-to-ther'-ap-e) (yeAav, to laugh; therapy). Treatment of disease by the induction of laughter.
  • Gelsemism (jeV -sem-izm) . Poisoning from the use of Gelsemium sempervirens. In light cases it is marked by dizziness, ptosis, and weakness of the legs; in severe cases, by tremor, anesthesia, and dyspnea.
  • Gelsemperin (jel-sem' -per -in) . A preparation from Gelsemium sempervirens. Dose i gr. (0.008-0.065 Gm.).
  • Gemellary (jem-el'-ar-e) (gemellus). Relating to or like twins.
  • Gemelliparous (jem-el-ip'-ar-us) (gemellus; parere, to bring forth). Bearing twins.
  • Gemellus (jem-el'-us) (dim. of geminus, a twin). Applied to one of two muscles, gemel- lus superior and gemellus inferior; also to the gastrocnemius muscle, on account of its two heads of origin.
  • Gemmule (jem'-ul) (gemmula, dim. of gemma, a bud). A small bud.
  • Genal (je'-nal) (jkvug, the cheek). Relating to the cheek.
  • Genera (jen'-er-ah) (L.). Plural of genus.
  • General (jen'-er-al) (genus, race). Common to a class; distributed through many parts; diffuse. G. Anatomy, anatomy of the tissues in general, as distinguished from special anatomy, that dealing with special organs. G. Paralysis, G. Paresis. See Paralysis, Gen- eral. G. Pathology. See Pathology, General.
  • Generic (jen-er'-ik) (genus, a kind). Pertaining to the same genus.
  • Genesial, Genesiac (jen-e'-ze-al, jen-e' -ze-ak) (genesis). Pertaining to generation.
  • Genesic, Genetic (jen-e'-zik, jen-et'-ik) (genesis). 1. Pertaining to generation; producing. 2. A drug acting on the genital apparatus. 3. A disease affecting the genital organs.
  • Genesis (jen'-es-is) (jkveocc, production). Be- getting; development; origin; formation; generation.
  • Genetous (jen'-et-us) (genesis). Congenital.
  • Genial (je'-ne-al) (jkvecov, chin). Pertaining to the chin. G. Tubercles, four prominent tu- bercles on the internal surface of the lower jaw.
  • Genib- (je-ne-o-) (ykvztov, chin). A prefix denoting connection with the chin.
  • Genion (je'-ne-on) (yhecov, chin). The chin.
  • Genioplasty (je' ' -ne-o-plas-te) (genio-; TzXhooncv, to form). The operation of restoring the chin.
  • Genitalia (jen-it-a' -le-ah) (genital). The organs of generation. In the male these consist of two testicles or seminal glands, with their excretory ducts, the prostate, the penis, and the urethra. The female genitalia include the vulva, the vagina, the ovaries, the fallo- pian tubes, and the uterus.
  • Genitality (jen-it-al' -it-e) (genital). Capacity for taking part in generation.
  • Genito- (jen-it-o-) (genitalis, genital). A pre- fix denoting connection with or relation to the genital organs.
  • Genitocrural (jen-it-o-kru'-ral). See under Nerve.
  • Genitourinary (jen-it-o-w '-rin-a-re) . Relating to the genitalia and the urinary organs.
  • Genoplasty (jen' -o-plas-le). See Genyplasty.
  • Gentianin (jen-she-an'-in). A crude bitter substance from gentian; it is used as a tonic in dyspepsia, hysteria, etc. Syn., Crude gentianic acid; Crude gentisin.
  • Gentianose (jen' ' -she-an-oz), C 16 H 66 31 . A crystallizable polysaccharid obtained from gentian root.
  • Genuclast (jen r -u-klast) (genu; nXaecv, to break). An instrument for breaking adhesions of the knee-joint.
  • Genucubital (jen-u-ku' -bit-al) (genu; cubitus, elbow). Relating to or supported by the knees and elbows.
  • Genupectoral (jen-u-pek' '-to-ral) (genu; pectus, breast), i. Relating to the knee and the chest. 2. Pertaining to the knee-chest posture ; — the patient resting upon the knees and chest.
  • Genus (jen'-us) (L.). A species or collection of species having in common characteristics differing greatly from those of other species.
  • Geny- (jen-e-) (yevug, jaw or cheek). A prefix de- noting relation to the jaw or the cheek.
  • Genyantrum, Genyantron (jen-e-an'-trum, -iron) (geny-; avzpov, cave). The maxillary antrum or antrum of Highmore.
  • Genycheiloplasty (jen-e-ki' -lo-plas-te) (geny-; %ecXoc, lip; TtXaooecv, to form). Plastic surgery of both cheek and lip.
  • Genyplasty (jen r -e-plas-te) (geny-; nXaoaecv, to form). An operation for restoring the cheek or the jaw.
  • Geoform (je' -o-form) . A tasteless, odorless, nontoxic compound of guaiacol and form- aldehyd; it is used as an antiseptic.
  • Geophagism (je-of'-aj-izm) (yrj, earth; (frayelv, to eat). The practice of eating earth or clay.
  • Georgina Paper (jor-je'-nah). See Dahlia- paper.
  • Geosote (je'-o-sot). See Guaiacol Valerate.
  • Geranium (jer-a' -ne-um) (yepdvcov, geranium). The geranium of the U. S. P. is the root of G. maculatum, crane's-bill root, the properties of which are due to tannic and gallic acids. It is an astringent, useful in diarrhea, etc. G., Fluidextract of (jluidextr actum geranii, U.-S. P.). Dose i dr. (2-4 Cc).
  • Geratology (jer-at-ol'-o-je) (y^pac, old age; Xeyscv, to speak). 1. A department of biology treating of the decadence and gradual ex- tinction of a group of organisms. 2. See "Gereology.
  • Gereology, Geraeology (jer-e-oV '-o-je) (ffjpac, old age; Xojoc, science). The science of old age; the structural changes and diseases in- cident to it, its hygiene, etc.
  • Germander (jer-man' -der) (ME., germawnder). A popular name for plants of the labiate genus Teucrium.
  • Germicidal (jer-mis-i' '-dal) (see Germicide). Destroying germs.
  • Germicide (jer' '-mis-Id) (germ; ccedere, to kill). An agent that destroys germs.
  • Germiletum (jer -mil-e' -turn) . An antiseptic said to consist of a solution of borohydrofluoric and borosalybenzoic acids, boroglycerol, and formaldehyd, with potassium permanganate, menthol, thymol, and aromatics.
  • Germinal (jer'-min-al) (germ). Pertaining to a germ or to the development of a tissue or organ. G. Area. See Germ-area. G. Disc. See Disc, Germinal. G. Membrane, the blastoderm. G. Spot, the nucleolus of the ovule. G. Vesicle, the blastodermic vesicle.
  • Germination (jer -min-a! -shun) (germinatio, sprouting; budding). Sprouting of a seed or spore.
  • Germol (jer'-mol). A bactericidal preparation analogous to cresol-.
  • Gerodermia (jer-o-der' -me-ah) . See Geromor- phism.
  • Geromorphism (jer-o-mor'-fizm) (jT)pag, old age; piopcfrrj, form). The appearance of age in a young person.
  • Gerontic (jer-on'-tik) (yepovTCKoc, belonging to an old man). Pertaining to old age.
  • Gerontin (jer -on' -tin). See under Leukomains, Table of.
  • Gerontopia (jer-on-to'-pe-ah). See Presbyopia Gerontoxon (jer-on-toks'-on) (yepcov, an old man; tocov, a bow). The arcus senilis.
  • Giant (ji'-ant) (y'cyac, giant). A being or organism abnormally large. G.-cell. See Cell, Giant-. G.-fmger. Synonym of Macrodactyly.
  • Giantism (ji'-ant-izm). See Gigantism.
  • Gibber (gib'-er) (gibbus, a hump). A sac-like enlargement. G. inferior thalami. See Pulvinar. G. ulnae, the olecranon.
  • Gibbosity (gib-os'-it-e) (gibbus). The condition of being humpbacked.
  • Gibbous (gib' -us) (gibbus). Humpbacked.
  • Giddiness (gid'-e-nes) (ME., gidi, dizzy). A sensation of whirling or unsteadiness of the body; vertigo.
  • Gigantoblast (ji - gan' -to - blast) (gigantism; (Haoxdc, a germ). A large nucleated red cor- puscle, found in the blood in pernicious ane- mia.
  • Gigantocyte (ji-ganf -o-sit) (gigantism; k'jxoc, cell). A large nonnucleated red blood-cor- puscle.
  • Gill (Jit) (gillo, a flask). A measure of capacity containing one-fourth of a pint.
  • Gillenin (jil'-en-in) (see Gillenia). The active principle of American ipecac. Dose 4-6 gr. (0.26-0.4 Gm.).
  • Gilvor (jil'-vor) (gilvus, pale yellow). The earthy complexion accompanying certain forms of cachexia and dyscrasia.
  • Gin (Jin) (OF., genevre, juniper). Common grain-spirit distilled and flavored with juniper- berries. It is a stimulant and diuretic. Spiritus juniperi compositus is its official sub- stitute in the U. S. P. G.-drinker's Liver, the liver of atrophic cirrhosis.
  • Ginger (jin'-jer). See Zingiber.
  • Gingiva (jin-ji' -vah) (L.). The gum; the vascular tissue surrounding the necks of the teeth and covering the alveoli.
  • Gingival (jin'-jiv-al) (gingiva). Pertaining to the gums. G. Line, a line along the gums, seen in chronic metallic poisoning, as the blue line of lead.
  • Gingivitis (Jin-jiv'-i' -tis) (gingiva; cxcg, inflam- mation). Inflammation of the gums.
  • Ginglymus (gin'-glim-us). See Diarthrosis.
  • Ginseng (jin'-seng) (Chinese, jin-tsan, ginseng). The root of several species of Panax or At alia. It has no other medicinal virtues than those of a demulcent, but it has a wonderful repu- tation in China, to which country most of it is exported.
  • Githagism (gith'-a-jism) (gith, a black-seeded plant; agere, to carry). The condition of chronic poisoning produced in man and animals attributed to the seeds of the corn- cockle (Lychnis githago), which often find their way into cereal foods.
  • Gizzard (giz'-ard) (L., gigeria, the cooked entrails of poultry). The strong muscular stomach of birds used for triturating the food. A proprietary substance, ingluvin, prepared from it, has been used in dyspepsia.
  • Glabella, Glabellum (gla-bel'-ah, -urn) (dim. of glaber, smooth). The smooth triangular space between the eyebrows, just above the root of the nose.
  • Glabrification (gla-bri-fi-ka'-shun) (glaber, smooth; facer e, to make). The process of becoming smooth, glistening, and hairless.
  • Glabrificins (gla-brif -is-ins) . See Antibodies.
  • Glacial (gla' -she-al) (glades, ice). Icy; re- sembling ice in appearance, as glacial acetic or phosphoric acid.
  • Gladiolin (glad-i' -o-lin) (gladiolus'). An alkaloid in brain tissue.
  • Gladiolus (glad-e-o' -lus) (dim. of gladius, a sword). The middle or second piece of the sternum.
  • Glairin (glar' -in) (OF., glair e, the white of egg; from clarus, clear). A peculiar organic, gelatinous substance found on the surface of some thermal waters Syn., Baregin.
  • Glairy (gldr'-e) (see Glairin). Slimy; albuminous.
  • Glanderous (glan r -der-us) (glanders). Affected with glanders.
  • Glandiform (glan' -de-form) (gland; forma, form). r. Acorn-shaped. 2. Adenoid.
  • Glandilemma (glan-dil-em' '-ah) (gland; Ikp-iia, husk). The capsule of a gland.
  • Glandula, Glandule (glan'-du-lah, glan'-dul) (L.). A little gland. GLANDULAR 450 GLISCHROBACTERIUM Glandular (glan'-du-lar) (glandula). Relating to, or of the nature of, a gland.
  • Glandulen (glan' -du-len) . A preparation of the bronchial glands of sheep, used in the treatment of tuberculosis. Dose 12-20 gr. (0.77-1.3 Gm.) 3 times daily, Glanduliform (glan-du'-le-form). Shaped like a gland.
  • Glans (glanz) (L., "an acorn"). An acorn- shaped body. G. clitoridis, the rounded end of the clitoris, analogous to the glans penis of the male. G. penis, the conic body forming the head of the penis.
  • Glauber Salt (glaw'-ber) (from Glauber, a Ger- man chemist). Sodium sulfate.
  • Glaucomatous (glaw-kom' '-at-us) (see Glau- . coma). Affected with or pertaining to glau- coma.
  • Gleet (gist) (AS., glidan, to glide). The chronic stage of urethritis, characterized by a slight mucopurulent discharge. Gleety (gle'-te) (gleet). Resembling the dis- charge of gleet.
  • Glenohumeral (gle-no-hu 1 '-mer-al) (glenoid; humerus). Pertaining to the glenoid cavity and the humerus. G. Ligaments, three ligaments of the capsule of the shoulder- joint.
  • Glia (gli'-ah) (yX'ca, glue). The neuroglia.
  • Gliabacteria (gli-ah-bak-te' -re-ah) (glia; bac- teria). Bacteria in the zooglea stage, em- bedded in a gelatinous matrix.
  • Gliacyte (gW -ah-sit) (glia; kuzoc, cell). A neuroglia cell.
  • Gliadin (gli'-ad-in) (glia). A proteid found in wheat-gluten.
  • Gliococcus (gli-o-kok'-us) (glia; kokkoc, a berry). A micrococcus invested with a gel- atinous envelop.
  • Gliomatosis (gli-o-mat-o' -sis) (glioma). The development of exuberant masses of glioma- like tissue in the nerve -centers. It is seen in the spinal cord in some cases of syringo- myelia.
  • Gliomatous (gli-o' '-mat-us) . Of the nature of, or affected with, glioma.
  • Gliomyoma (gli-o-mi-o' -mah) . Glioma com- bined with myoma.
  • Gliomyxoma (gli-o-miks-o' -mah) . A glioma with a mucoid degeneration.
  • Glioneuroma (gli-o-nu-ro' -mah) . See Neu- roglioma, Ganglionar.
  • Gliosarcoma (gli-o-sar-ko' -mah) . A tumor having the neuroglia cells of glioma and the fusiform cells of sarcoma.
  • Gliosis (gli-o' -sis) (glia; vooog, disease). A brain disease marked by foci of sclerosed gray substance, with the formation of lacunar spaces within the foci. It differs from ordin- ary diffused sclerosis. G. cervicalis, syringo- myelia.
  • Glischrin (glis'-krin). Malerba's name for a nitrogenous mucus formed in urine by Bac* terium gliscrogenum.
  • Glischrobacterium (glis - kro - bah - te'-re - um) (yX'coxpoc, viscid; bacterium). The micro- GLISCHROGENOUS 451 GLOSSOMANTEIA organism Bacterium gliscrogenum, causing mucous degeneration of the urine.
  • Glischrogenous (glis-kroj'-en-us) (j-Xcoxpoc, viscid; yevvav, to produce). Giving rise to viscidity.
  • Glissonitis (glis-on-i'-tis). Inflammation of Glisson's capsule.
  • Globin (glo'-bin) (globus). A proteid derived from hemoglobin.
  • Globomyeloma (glo-bo-mi-el-o' '-mah) (globus; myeloma). A round-celled sarcoma.
  • Globule (glob' -ill) (dim. of globus). A small spheric particle, as a blood-corpuscle or lymph-corpuscle; also a small pill or pellet. G.s, Directing, G.s, Directive, G.s, Extrusion, G.s, Polar. See Bodies, Direction.
  • Globulicidal (glob-u-lis'-i-dal) (globule; ccedere, to kill). Destructive to the blood-corpuscles.
  • Globulinuria (glob-u-lin-u'-re-ah) (globulin; obpov, urine). The presence of globulin in the urine.
  • Globus (glo'-bus) (L.). A ball or globe. G. hystericus, the "lump" or choking sensation occurring in hysteria, caused probably by spasmodic contraction of the esophageal and pharyngeal muscles. G. major, the larger end or head of the epididymis G. minor, the lower end of the epididymis.
  • Glomer (glo'-mer) (glomus). A conglomerate gland.
  • Glomerate (glom' - er - at) (glomerare, to wind around). Rolled together like a ball of thread.
  • Glomerulitis (glom-er-u-W -tis) (glomerule; ctcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the glomerules of the kidney.
  • Glomerulonephritis (glom-er-u-lo-ne-ri f -tis) (glomerule ; veuzov, a growth). A dark discoloration of the tongue, due to the accumulation of spores and dead epithelium. Syn., Black tongue.
  • Glossoplegia (glos-o-ple' -je-ah) (glosso-; nl-qy-q, stroke). Paralysis of the tongue.
  • Glossospasm (glos'-o-spazm) (glosso-; o7caojj.dc, spasm). Spasm of the tongue.
  • Glossotrichia (glos-o-trik' -e-ah) (glosso-; 6pi£, hair). Hairy tongue.
  • Glucase (glu'-kdz). The enzym that hydrolyzes maltose. It is found in the blood, tissues, and juices of the animal body and in various species of yeast.
  • Glutenin (glu'-ten-in). A proteid of wheat.
  • Gluteofascial (glu-te-o-)ah' -she-al) (gluteus; fascia, bundle). Relating to the fascia of the gluteal region.
  • Gluteofemoral (glu-te-o-fem f -or-al) (gluteus; femur). Relating to the buttock and the thigh.
  • Gluteus (glu-te'-us) (yXouzoc, buttock). One of the large muscles of the buttock. See under Muscle.
  • Glutin (glu'-tin). i. See Gelatin. 2. Synonym of Gluten-casein.
  • Glutinpeptone Sublimate (glu-tin-pef -ton) . An antiseptic preparation of mercury con- taining 25 % of mercury bichlorid and obtained by the action of hydrochloric acid on gelatin. It occurs as a hygroscopic white powder or a noncorrosive liquid used hypo- dermatically in syphilis. Dose 15 gr. (1 Gm.).
  • Glutoform, Glutol (glu'-to-form, glu'-tol). See Formaldehyd- gelatin.
  • Gluton (glu'-ton) . A dietetic substance obtained from gelatin by the action of acids at a high temperature for several hours.
  • Glycemia (gli-se' -me-ah) (^glucose; al(xa, blood). The presence of glucose in the blood.
  • Glyceric (glis-er' -ik) . Derived from glycerid or glycerol.
  • Glycerid (glis r -er-id) (glycerol). A compound of glycerol and an acid; the neutral fats are glycerids.
  • Glycerin, Glycerinum (glis'-er-in, glis-er-i'- num) (yXunuc, sweet). 1. See Glycerol. 2. In the British Pharmacopeia, a solution of a medicinal substance in glycerol; a glycerite. G. Suppositories (suppositoria glycerini, U.S. P.), each contains 6 Gm. of glycerol; they are used in constipation.
  • Glycerite, Glyceri turn (glis'-er-it, glis-er-i'-tum) (see Glycerin). A mixture of medicinal sub- stances with glycerol. The following glycerites are official : Glyceritum acidi tannici; G. amyli; « G. boro glycerini; G. ferri quinina et strych- nine phosphatum; G. Hydrastis; G. phenolis.
  • Glycerolate, Glycerolatum (glis'-er-o-lat, glis- er -o-la' -turn). Same as Glycerite. G., Aro- matic, a sticky, transparent substance con- sisting of tragacanth, 4 parts; acetone, 30 parts; glycerol, 46 parts; water, 18 parts; aromatic perfume, 4 parts; it is recommended in the treatment of skin diseases.
  • Glycerophosphate (glis-er -o-fos' -fat). A com- bination of glycerol and phosphoric acid with a base.
  • Glyceryl (glis'-er-il) (glycerol). The trivalent radicle, C 3 H 5 , of glycerol, combining with the fatty acids to form the neutral fats. G. Trini- trate, Spirit of (spiritus gly eery lis nitratis, U. S. P.), spirit of nitroglycerin.
  • Glycin (gli' -sin). Synonym of Glycocoll.
  • Glyco- (gli-ko-) (fXoKoc, sweet). A prefix meaning sweet.
  • Glycocholic Acid (gli-ko-koV -ik) (glyco-; joH), bile). An acid found in the bile. See Acid, Glycocholic.
  • Glycogelatin (gli-ko-jeV -at-in) . An ointment- base consisting of glycerol and gelatin.
  • Glycogenal, Glycogenol (gli-ko' -jen-al, -ol). A substance allied to glycogen. It is used in tuberculosis by inhalation and internally. Dose 15-23 gr. (1.0-1.5 Gm.).
  • Glycogeny (gli - kof - en - e) (glycogen). The normal production of glycogen.
  • Glycohemia (gli-ko -he f -me-ah) (glyco-; al/xa, blood). A saccharine condition of the blood. Syn., Glycemia.
  • Glycoheroin (gli-ko-her'-o-in). A proprietary liquid expectorant said to contain heroin and hyoscyamin. Dose- 1 dr. (4 Cc).
  • Glycol (gli'-kol) (yXuKvc, sweet). A diatomic alcohol; a compound intermediate in its properties and chemic relations between mono- hydric alcohol and trihydric glycerol.
  • Glycolamin (gli-kol-am' '-in)-. Synonym of Glycocoll.
  • Glycoline (gli' -kol-en) . A purified petroleum for use in atomizers.
  • Glycolytic (gli-kol-it' -ik) (glucose; Xuotc, dissolu- tion). Splitting up glucose.
  • Glyconin (gli'-ko-nin). A mixture of yolk of egg, 45, and glycerol, 55 parts. Syn., Glyceri- tum vitelli.
  • Glycosal (gW -ko-sal) . Monosalicylic glycerol ester, a white powder readily soluble in hot water and alcohol, and less freely in ether and chloroform. It is antirheumatic. Dose 8-150 gr. (0.52-9.75 Gm.) a day. Applied in 20% alcoholic solution.
  • Glycosemia (gli-ko-se' -me-ah) . See Glycemia and Glycohemia.
  • Glycothymolin (gli-ko-thi' '-mol-iri) . An anti- septic cleansing solution for the treatment of diseased mucous membrane. Said to con- sist of glycerol, sodium, boric acid, thymol, menthol, salicylic acid eucalyptol, and other antiseptics.
  • Glycovanillin (gli-ko-van-il'-in), C 6 H 3 (OCH) 3 - (OC 6 H n 5 )CHO + 2FTO. The glucosid of vanillin, formed by the oxidation of coniferin with dilute chromium trioxid. Syn., Glucovan- illin.
  • Glycozone (gW -ko-zon) . A combination of pure glycerol with 15 times its own volume of ozone at o° C. It is a healing agent, used in gastric ulcer, etc., in teaspoonful doses diluted with water.
  • Glycuronic Acid (gli-ku-ron' '-ik) . See Acid, Glycuronic.
  • Glykaolin (gli-ka' -ol-in) . A compound of aluminium silicate, phenyl salicylate, and glycerol made into a smooth paste; it is indicated in the treatment of wounds, ulcers, sprains, burns, etc.
  • Gnathic (na'-thik) (gnathion). Pertaining to the jaw. G. Index. See Index, Gnathic.
  • Gnathion (na'-the-on) (yvadoc, jaw). The lowest point in the median line of the inferior maxilla.
  • Gnathocephalus (nath - o-sef' -al- us) (gnathion; tceaXr), the head). A monster lacking all parts of the head except large jaws.
  • Goggles (gog'-lz) (Irish and Gael., gog, a nod). Spectacles with colored lenses and wire or cloth sides, to protect the eyes from excessive light or dust.
  • Goitriferous (goi-trif -er-us) (goiter; ferre, to bear). Giving rise to goiters.
  • Goitrous (goi'-trus) (goiter). Relating to or affected with goiter.
  • Gold. See Aurum. G.-beaters' Skin, a thin membrane prepared from the cecum of the ox. G., Fulminating, Au 2 3 (NH 3 ) 4 , a compound obtained from auric oxid or auric hydrate by action of ammonia; a green- ish-brown powder exploding with great vio- lence on heating or percussion.
  • Gomenol (go' -men-ol) . A syrup used in per- tussis said to be prepared from the leaves of Melaleuca leucadendron. Dose 5-50 min. i. Q -33~3-33 Cc.) in capsules.
  • Gomphiasis (gom-fi'-as-is) (yopcfiiaocc, tooth- ache). Looseness of the teeth.
  • Gomphosis (gom-fo'-sis). See Synarthrosis.
  • Gonae (go'-ne) (L.). The genitals.
  • Gonagra (gon-a'-grah) (yo^o, knee; aypa, seiz- ure). Gout of the knee-joint.
  • Gonangiectomy (go-nan-je-ek' -to-me) (rovof, generation; ayyilov, vessel; i/czoprj, excision). Excision of a portion of the vas deferens.
  • Gonarthritis (gon-ar-thri'-tis) \jovu, knee; arthritis). 1. Inflammation of the knee-joint. 2. Synonym of Gonorrheal synovitis.
  • Gonarthrocace (gon-ar-throk' -as-e) (ybvu, knee; apdpov, a joint; kolhtj, evil). White swelling of the knee-joint.
  • Gonarthromeningitis (gon-ar-thro-men-in-ji'- tis) \joiy'j, knee; apdpov, a joint; pffjcyz, mem- brane; crcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the synovial membrane of the knee.
  • Gonecyst (gon'-e-sist) (your), semen; kuotcc, cyst). A seminal vesicle.
  • Gonecystitis (gon-e-sis-ti' '-tis) (gonecyst; c~ig, inflammation). Inflammation of the seminal vesicles.
  • Gonepoietic (gon-e-poi-et'-ik) (yovrj, semen; -o.'cZv, to make). Pertaining to the secretion of semen.
  • Gongyloid ( gon' -jil-oid) (yoyyuXog, round; eldoc, likeness). Having an irregular round shape. Gonid (go'-nid). See Gonidium.
  • Gonidium (go-nid '-e-um) \jovr), seed; pi., go- nidia). In biology, (a) one of the grass-green algal elements of the lichen thai! us; (b) also called gonid, and applied to various asexually produced reproductive bodies.
  • Gonion (go' -tie-on) (yio^'ca, an angle). In cranio- metry, the outer side of the angle of the in- ferior maxilla.
  • Gonococcemia (gon-o-kok-se'-me-ah) (gonococ- cus; alua, blood). The presence of gonococci in the blood.
  • Gonococcia (gon-o-kok' -se-ah) . Same as Gono- hemia.
  • Gonococcus (gon-o-kok' -us) (yo^r / semen; kokkoc, a berry). The organism causing gonorrhea. See Micrococcus gonorrhoea' under Bacteria.
  • Gonocyte (gon'-o-sit) (yow t , semen; kjzoc, cell). Van Beneden's name for the ovum which contains only the female pronucleus, the male part having been expelled as directive bodies. G., Male, a spermatozoon.
  • Gonohemia (gon-o-he' -me-ah) (gonorrhea; alpa, blood). Generalized gonorrheal infection.
  • Gonorrheal (gon-or-e'-al) (gonorrhea). Relating to gonorrhea, as gonorrheal ophthalmia. G. Rheumatism, inflammation of one or more 'joints as a sequel of gonorrhea.
  • Gonotoxemia (gon-o-toks-e' -me-ah). Toxemia attributable to infection with the gonococcus.
  • Gonotoxin (gon-o-toks'-in). A nondialyzable toxin produced both in the cocci and in the culture-mediums by gonococci.
  • Gorget (gor'-jei) (gurges, a chasm). A chan- neled instrument, similar to a grooved director, used in lithotomy. GOSSELIN'S FRACTURE 456 GRADUATE Gosselin's Fracture. A V-shaped fracture of the lower end of the tibia.
  • Gouge (gowj) (Fr.). An instrument for cut- ting or removing bone or other hard struc- tures.
  • Goundou (goon'-doo). An affection occurring among the negroes of the western coast of Africa. It consists of the growth of two bony, ovoid, symmetric tumors which arise at the root of the nose on each side and which, by their growth, narrow the nasal fossas and interfere with vision.
  • Gouty (gow'-te) (gout). Of the nature of gout; affected with gout. G. Kidney, chronic interstitial nephritis due to gout.
  • Graduated (grad'-u-a-ted). Arranged in de- grees or steps. G. Compress, a compress made of pieces decreasing progressively in size, the apex or smallest piece being applied to the focus of pressure.
  • Gram, Gramme (gram) (ypa/ijia, inscription). The gravimetric unit of the metric system of weights and measures, equivalent to the weight of a cubic centimeter of distilled water at its maximum density. See Weights and Measures.
  • Grammolecule (gram-moV-e-kul). In a solu- tion or mixture, the weight of an atom or molecule of the active chemical expressed in grams. Syn., Grammole; Mol; Mole.
  • Gramnegative (gram-neg' '-at-iv) . Incapable of staining by Gram's method. Grampositive (gram-pos'-it-iv). Capable of staining by Gram's method.
  • Granula (gran' -u-lah) (granum, a grain). The granules, cytoblasts, or microsomes of proto- plasm.
  • Granular (gran'-u-lar) (granide). Made up of, or containing, granules. G. Layer. See under Retina. G. Lids, trachoma. G. Pharyngitis, pharyngitis characterized by the presence of prominent follicles.
  • Granulase (gran'-u-laz) (granum). An enzym found in cereals, converting starch into ach- roodextrin and maltose.
  • Granuliform (gran-u'-le-form) (granule; forma, form). Resembling small grains.
  • Granulofatty (gran-u-lo-fat'-e). Applied to cells in tissue undergoing fatty degeneration, which contain granules of fat. Syn., Granu- loadipose.
  • Granuloplasm (gran 1 ' -u-lo-plazm) (granule; plasma, something formed). The granular protoplasmic mass in the inner part of a cell.
  • Granulose (gran f -u-los) (granule). The mate- rial that forms the inner portion of starch- granules.
  • Granum (gra'-num). See Grain.
  • Grape-cure (grap'-kur). A treatment of pul- monary tuberculosis consisting in the inges- tion of large quantities of grapes.
  • Graphic (graf'-ik) (ypafocv, to write). Relating to writing or recording, or to the process of making automatic tracings of phenomena, showing degree, rhythm, etc.
  • Graphite (graf'-it) (see Graphic). Plum- bago or black-lead, an impure allotropic form of carbon. It has been applied exter- nally in skin diseases.
  • Grapho- (graf-o-) (jpafecv, to write). A prefix meaning to write.
  • Graphology (gra-oV-o-je) (grapho-; Xoyoc, science). The study of the handwriting for the purpose of diagnosing nerve disease.
  • Graphomotor (graf-o-mo'-tor) (grapho-; movere, to move). Relating to graphic movements.
  • Graphorrhea (graf-or-e' -ah) (grapho-; peia, flow). An intermittent condition in certain forms of insanity, marked by an uncontrollable desire to cover pages with usually unconnected and meaningless words.
  • Graphoscope (graf'-o-skop) (grapho-; oKonelv, to view). A convex lens devised for the treatment of asthenopia and progressive myopia.
  • Graphospasm (graf'-o-spazm) (grapho-; cnzao- fj.dc, spasm). Writers' cramp.
  • Gratification (jel-at -if-ik-a' -shun). 1. The production of gelatin. 2. See Gelification.
  • Grating (grafting) (grata, a grating), i. A frame or screen composed of bars. 2. A sound produced by the friction of very rough surfaces against each other. 3. A glass ruled with exceedingly fine parallel lines to produce chromatic dispersion in the rays of light reflected from it.
  • Grattage (grat-ahzh) (Ft.). A method of removing morbid growths, as polyps or trachomatous granulations, by rubbing with a harsh sponge or brush.
  • Gravative (grav'-ah-tiv) (gravis, heavy). At- tended by a sense of weight; said of the pressure-pains of tumors.
  • Gravel (grav'-l) (Fr., gravelle, from Bret., grouan, gravel). A granular, sand-like ma- terial forming the substance of urinary cal- culi, and often passed with the urine in the form of detritus.
  • Gravid (grav'-id) (gravidus, pregnant). - Pregnant. G. Uterus, the uterus during pregnancy.
  • Gravida (grav' -id-ah) (gravid). A pregnant woman.
  • Gravidocardiac (grav-id-o-kar'-de-ak) (gravid; cardiac). Relating to cardiac disorders due to pregnancy.
  • Gravimetric (grav-e-met'-rik) (gravis, heavy; ixkxpov, a measure). Pertaining to measure- ment by weight. G. Analysis. See Analy- sis, Gravimetric.
  • Gravistatic (grav-is-tat'-ik) (gravis; orarctcrj, the art of weighing). Due to gravitation; applied to a form of congestion.
  • Gravity (grav'-it-e) (gravis). Weight. G., Specific, the measured weight of a sub- stance compared with that of an equal volume of another taken as a standard. For gaseous fluids, hydrogen is taken as the standard; for liquids and solids, distilled water at its maximum density.
  • Gray (gra) (AS., grceg). The color obtained by mixing white and black. G. Hepatization. See Hepatization, Gray. G. Matter, that forming the outer part of the brain and the inner part of the cord, containing the specialized cells of these parts. G. Powder. See Mercury with Chalk.
  • Green (gren) (ME., grene). Of the color of grass, obtained by mixing yellow and blue. G\ -blindness, a variety of color-blindness in which green is not distinguished. G., Paris-, copper acetoarsenite. G., Scheele's, copper arsenite. G., Schweinfurt. Synonym of G., Paris-.
  • Greensickness (gren' -sik-nes) . Chlorosis.
  • Greffotome (gref'-o-tom) (Fr., greffe, graft; zo (i6c, cutting). A knife used in cutting slips for surgical grafting.
  • Gregarina (greg-ar-i'-nah) (grex, a herd). A genus of Protozoa.
  • Grinder (grin'-der) (AS., grindan, to grind). A molar tooth. ', Grinders' Asthma. A fibroid pneumonia, a chronic affection of the lungs resulting from the inspiration of metallic or silicious dust.
  • Grip, la Grippe (grip, lah grip). See Influ- enza.
  • Gripes (grips) (see Gripe). Colic; tormina.
  • Grippotoxin (grip-o-toks'-in). A name for the ' toxin elaborated by Bacillus influenza.
  • Gristle (gris'-T) (AS., gristel\. Cartilage.
  • Gross (gros) (Ft., gros, great). Coarse; large. G. Anatomy. See Anatomy, Gross.
  • Growing-pains (gro'-ing) (AS., grdwan, to grow; pain). A term applied to pains in the limbs occurring during youth, and probably of rheumatic origin.
  • Gruel (gru'-T) (AS., grut, groats). A decoction of corn-meal or oatmeal boiled in water to a thick paste.
  • Grumous (gru'-mus) (grumus, a little heap). Clotted; consisting of lumps.
  • Grutum (gru' -turn) . See Milium.
  • Gryochrome (gri f -o-krom) \ypo, a morsel; %pd){ia, color). A somatochrome nerve-cell the stainable portion of which consists of minute granules which tend to form threads or heaps.
  • Guachamaca (gwa-shaw-maw' -kah) . The bark of an apocynaceous tree. G. toxifera, or Malouetia nitida, furnishes a virulent arrow- poison, somewhat resembling curara; it has been employed in tetanus and hydrophobia. Unof.
  • Guaco (gwa'-ko). The Mikania guaco and other species of Mikania and Aristolochia, used in South America for snake-bites; it has been employed in rheumatism, gout, and in various skin diseases. Dose of a watery extract 3 min. (0.19 Cc).
  • Guaethol (gwa-eth' -ol) . Guaiacol ethyl, C 6 H 4 - OC 2 H 5 OH. It resembles guaiacol in thera- peutic action. Dose 2-4 gr. (0.1-0.25 Gm.). Application, 15% ointment. Syn., Ajacol; Pyrocatechin-monoethyl ether; Thanaiol.
  • Guaiacamphol (gwi-ah-kam'-fol). The cam- phoric acid ester of guaiacol; employed in treatment of night-sweats of tuberculosis. Dose 3-8 gr. (0.2-0.5 Gm.).
  • Guaiacetin (gwi-as' -et-in) . Pyrocatechin -mono- acetate, C 6 H 4 . OH . OCH 2 COOH. It is used like guaiacol in tuberculosis. Dose 7^ gr. (0.5 Gm.) 3 times daily and reduced in 3 weeks to 7J gr. (0.5 Gm.) daily.
  • Guaiacolate (gwi-aW -ol-at) . A combination of guaiacol with a base.
  • Guaiacyl (gwi'-as-il), C 7 H 7 2 S0 3 . The cal- cium salt of a sulfocompound of guaiacol; used as a local anesthetic injected in quanti- ties of 8-25 gr. (0.5-1.5 Gm.) of a 5 % solution or 15 gr. (1 Gm.) of a 10% solution.
  • Guaiamar (gwi'-am-ar), C C H 4 . OC 3 H 7 2 .- OCH 3 , guaiacolgly eery lest er; employed in tuberculosis and as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose 5-20 gr. (0.33-1.33 Gm.) before meals. It is also applied in arthritis.
  • Guaiaperol (gwi-ap'-er-ol). See Piperidin Guaiacolate.
  • Guaiaquin (gwi'-ah-kwin), (C ? H 4 2 CH 3 HS0 3 ) ? - C^H^NgO^, the guaiacol bisulfonate of qui- nin; it is used in malaria, typhoid fever, anemia, etc. Dose 5-10 gr. (0.33-0.65 Gm.) 3 times daily. Syn., Quinin guaiacol bisul- fonate.
  • Guanin (gwah'-nin) (see Guano), C 5 H 5 N 5 0. A leukomain found in the pancreas, liver, and in muscle-extract as a decomposition-pro- duct of nuclein. It also occurs in guano, and is nonpoisonous. See Capranica.
  • Guano (gwah'-no) (Per., huanu, dung). The excrement of sea-fowl found on certain islands in the Pacific Ocean. It contains guanin and alkaline urates and phosphates, and is used externally in certain skin diseases.
  • Gujasanol (gu-jas'-an-ol). See Diethyl Glyco- coll-guaiacol Hydro chlorate.
  • Gullet (gul'-ei). See Esophagus.
  • Gumma (gum'-ah) (gum). The gummy tumor characterizing the tertiary stage of syphilis. It consists of granulation tissue, with giant- cells, and is the seat of a peculiar degen- eration which causes the gummy appear- ance.
  • Gummatous (gum'-at-us) (gumma). Of the na- ture of or affected with gummas.
  • Gummide (gum' -id). Any compound which yields glucose on decomposition with acids or alkalis.
  • Gun j ah (gun' -j ah). The official part of Indian hemp, consisting of the dried flowering- tops of the female plant, from which the rosin has not been removed. Syn., Ganjah.
  • Guncotton (gun' -kot-n) . See Pyroxylin.
  • Gutta ((gut'-ah) (L.). A drop. G. rosacea, acne rosacea. G. serena, amaurosis.
  • Guttapercha (gut-ah-per'-cha) (Malayan gutta, gum; pertja, the tree furnishing the gum). The concrete juice of Dichopsis gutta and other species of the natural order Sapotacece. It is used to make splints, as a dressing for wounds, and as a vehicle for caustic sub- stances.
  • Guttatim (gut-a'-tim) (L.). Drop by drop.
  • Guttiform (gut' -e- form) (gutta; forma, form). Drop-shaped.
  • Guttur (gut'-er) (L.). The throat.
  • Guttural (gut'-u-ral) (guttur). Pertaining to the throat.
  • Gutturotetany (gut -u-ro- tet' -an-e) (guttur; tetanus). A form of stuttering in which the pronunciation of such sounds as g, k, q, is difficult.
  • Gymnobacteria (jim-no-bak-te' -re-ah) (gymnos; bacteria). Nonflagellate bacteria.
  • Gymnoplast (jim r -no-plast) (gymnos; tcXolooecv, to form). A protoplasmic body without a limiting membrane.
  • Gynatresia (gin-at-re'-ze-ah) (ywr), woman; drpf)a'ca, atresia). Imperforation of the vagina.
  • Gynecean, Gynecian (gin-e-se'-anj (yovq, woman). Pertaining to women.
  • Gynecology (gin-e-kol'-o-je) (juvtj, woman; Xoyoc, science). The science of the diseases of women, especially of those affecting the sexual organs.
  • Gynephobia (gin-e-fo'-be-ah) (yovi), woman; 4>6{3oc, fear). Morbid aversion to the society of women.
  • Gynocyanauridzarin (gin-o-si-an-aw-rid'-za- rin), (C 9 H 21 7 ) 2 KCNOAu 3 , used in leprosy, GYPSUM 463' HALLER'S ANSA tertiary syphilis, tuberculosis, psoriasis, etc.
  • H. 1. Symbol of hydrogen 1 . 2. Abbreviation of hyperopia and of haustus, a draught.
  • Haab's Pupil-reflex. If a bright object al- ready present in the visual field is looked at, the pupils contract, while there is no appre- ciable change during convergence or accom- modation. This points to a cortical lesion.
  • Habitat (hab'-it-at) (habitare, to dwell). The natural home of an animal or vegetal species.
  • Habitus (hab'-it-us) (habere, to have). General appearance or expression.
  • Hachement (hahsh-mon(g) ) (Fr., "hacking" or "chopping"). A form of massage consist- ing of a succession of strokes performed with the edge of the extended fingers or with the whole hand.
  • Hacking (hak'-ing). See Hachement.
  • Hadernkrankheit (hah' -dern-kronk-hlt) (Ger.). A disease of rag-pickers, by some supposed to be anthrax; others look upon it as malig- nant edema.
  • Haema- (hem-ah-). See Hema-.
  • Haeser's Coefficient. See Christison's For- mula.
  • Haffkine's Method. See under Immunization. H.'s Prophylactic, H.'s Serum, H.'s Virus. See Serum, Haffkine's.
  • Haffkinin (haf -kin-in) . Haffkine's plague serum. See Serum, Haffkine's.
  • Haidinger's Brushes. A brush-like image seen on directing the eye toward a source of polarized light, due to the doubly refrac- tive character of the elements of the macula.
  • Haines' Solution for Detecting Glucose. Copper sulfate, 3; potassium hydroxid, 9; glycerol, 100; water, 600. Use as Fehling's solution; a red precipitate will be formed.
  • Halimetry (hal-im'-et-re) (aXc, salt; (ikxpov, a measure). The process of determining the quantity of salts in a mixture.
  • Halisteresis (hal-is-ter-e' -sis) \akc, salt; oxkp- fjocc, privation). The loss of lime-salts of bone.
  • Halitus (hal'-it-us) £L.). A vapor, as that ex- pired from the lung.
  • Hall's (Marshall) Disease. Hydrocephaloid occurring in infants suffering from severe chronic intestinal catarrh. H.'s Facies, the prominent forehead and small features pecu- liar to hydrocephalus.
  • Hallopeau's Disease. Chronic pustular der- matitis, a form of Neumann's disease.
  • Hallucal (haV-u-kal) (hallux). Pertaining to the hallux, or great toe.
  • Hallucination (ha-lu-sin-a' -shun) (alucinari, to wander in mind). A false sense-perception; it is the perception of an object or phenom- enon which has no external existence, as hallucination of sight, sound, smell, taste, or touch.
  • Hallux (hal'-uks) (L.). The great toe. H. valgus, displacement of the great toe toward the other toes. H. varus, displace- ment of the great toe away from the other toes.
  • Halo (ha'-lo) (a\a>c, a round threshing-floor). i. The areola of the nipple. 2. The luminous circles seen about a light.
  • Halogen (hal'-o-jen) (dXc, salt; yevvav, to pro- duce). A univalent element that forms a compound of a saline nature by its direct union with a metal. The halogens are chlorin, iodin, bromin, and fluorin. H. Acid, an acid formed by the combination of a halogen with hydrogen.
  • Haloid (hal'-oid) (dXc, salt; eldoc, likeness). Resembling sea-salt. H. Salts, any one of those compounds that consist of a metal directly united to chlorin, bromin, iodin, or fluorin.
  • Halology (Jial-oV -o-je) (oUo, salt; Xbyog, science). The chemistry of salts.
  • Haloscope (hal'-o-skop) (aAf, salt; okotzecv, to examine). An apparatus for determining the amount of salt in a solution.
  • Hamose (ham'-oz) (hamus, a hook). Hooked at the apex.
  • Hamular (ham'-u-lar) (hamus). Pertaining to or shaped like a hook.
  • Hamulus (ham'-u-lus) (dim. of hamus, sl hook). A hook-shaped process, as of a bone. H. of the Cochlea, the hook-like process of the osseous lamina at the cupola.
  • Handkerchief (hang'-ker-chi) (ME., hand; kerchef, a kerchief). A square piece of cloth for wiping the face or nose. H. -dressing, a form of temporary dressing for wounds and fractures, made of handkerchiefs.
  • Hangnail (hang'-ndl). A partly detached piece of epidermis at the root of the nail, the friction against which has caused inflamma- tion of the abraded surface.
  • Hapalonychia (hap-al-o-nik' -e-ah) (dnaXoc , soft to the touch; 3vu£, nail). A soft condition of the nails.
  • Haphalgesia (haf-al-je'-ze-ah) (&7), touch; aXyoc, pain). A feeling of pain produced by merely touching an object.
  • Haptic (hap'-tik) (aTzrdf, subject to the sense of touch). Pertaining to touch; tactile.
  • Haptine (hap'-ten) (amecv, to bind). In Ehr- lich's lateral-chain theory, any thrown-off receptor.
  • Haptogen (hap'-to-jen) \aTzrecv, to bind; yevvdv, to produce). A pellicle forming around fatty matter when brought into contact with albu- min. Syn., Haptogenic membrane.
  • Haptophil (hap'-to-fil) (axrecv, to bind; fatelv, to love). In Ehrlich's side-chain theory ap- plied to a receptor having an affinity for the haptophore of a toxin.
  • Haptophore (hap' -to -for) (anxccv, to bind; (f>kpscv, to bear). That complex of atoms of a toxic unit which unites it to the cell-receptor.
  • Hardening (hard' '-en-ing) (AS., hearde, hard). A stage in the preparation of tissues for microscopic examination in which they are rendered firm, so that they may, after embed- ding, be readily cut.
  • Harderian Gland (har-de'-re-an). A race- mose gland located at the inner canthus of the eye of most vertebrates, and especially of those having a well-developed nictitating membrane, first described by John Jacob Harder, a Swiss anatomist.
  • Harmony (har'-mo-ne) (dp/jtovia, harmony). A form of articulation between two bones that are closely and immovably apposed.
  • Harrowing (har' -o-ing) . The action of teasing the fibers of a nerve or tearing them apart with any blunt instrument. — Hartmann's Fossa. A small, infundibular fossa of the peritoneum lying between Turn- er's inferior ligament and the mesoappendix. Syn., Fossa ileoccecalis infima.
  • Hartshorn (harts' -horn). 1. Cornu cervi, the horn of the stag, formerly a source of ammonia, or spirit of hartshorn. 2. A name popularly given to ammonia-water.
  • Hashish (hash'-esh). See Cannabis.
  • Haunch (hawnsh) (Fr., hanche). The part of the body including the hips and the buttocks. H.-bone, the innominate bone.
  • Haustus (haws' -tus) (hauriri, to draw). A draught.
  • Hawking (haw' -king) (ME., hauk, to hawk). Clearing the throat by a forcible expiration.
  • Health (helth) (see Healing). That con- dition of the body in which all the functions are performed normally.
  • Heartburn (hart' -berri) . A burning sensation at the epigastrium and lower part of the chest, caused by gastric fermentation.
  • Hebephrenia (he-be- j re' -ne-ah) (t)/?7?, puberty; pr)v, mind). A form of mental derangement occurring in young persons at or soon after the age of puberty, and characterized by mental deterioration and a gradually increas- ing egoism. It may end in a permanent de- mentia.
  • Hebetude (heb'-e-tud) (hebetudo, bluntness) Dulness of the special senses and intellect: a condition present in grave fevers.
  • Hebotomy (heb-ot'-o-me) (JJ/fy, pubes; rifivscv, to cut). Van de Velde's operation of sawing the pelvis in cases of obstructed delivery.
  • Hecatomeral, Hecatomeric (hek-at-om'-er-al, -ik) (sKazspov, each singly; fxipoc, a part). Applied to a neuron the processes of which HECKEL'S PRASOID TINCTURE 468 HELIUM divide into two parts, one going to each side of the spinal cord.
  • Hecto- (hek-to-) (eKarov, a hundred). A prefix signifying one hundred.
  • Hectogram (hek' -to-gram) (hecto-; jpappa, an inscription). One hundred grams, or I543-.2349 grains.
  • Hectoliter (hek'-to-le-ter) (hecto-; Acxpa, a pound). One hundred liters, e'qual to 22.009 imperial or 26.4 United States gallons.
  • Hectometer (hek' -to-me-ter) (hecto-; pkxpov, a measure). One hundred meters, or 328 feet inch.
  • Hedonal (lied' -on-al) . The ester of methyl- propyicarbinol-carbamic acid; recommended as a safe hypnotic in the milder forms of insomnia. Dose 20-45 g r - ( I -33 _2 -9 Gin.).
  • Hedroceie (hed'-ro-sel) (e3pa, breech; ktjXtj, hernia). 1. A hernia through the notch of the ischium. 2. Prolapse of the anus.
  • Heel (hel) (AS., hela). The hinder part of the foot. H.-bone, the calcaneum.
  • Helcodermatosis (hel-ko-der-mat-o'-sis) (hel- coma; dtp pa, skin). Skin disease with the formation of ulcers.
  • Helcoid (Jiel'-koid) (helcoma; eldog, likeness). Resembling an ulcer.
  • Helcoma (hel-ko' -mah) (U/coc, an ulcer). An ulcer.
  • Helcoplasty (hel' -ko-plas-te) (helcoma; nXaooecv, to form). The treatment of ulcers by skin- grafting.
  • Helenin ihel'-en-in), C 6 H g O. A stearopten from Inula helenium; it is used as an internal and external antiseptic. Dose ^— J gr. (0.011- 0.022 Gm.).
  • Heliciform (hel-is'-e-form) (helix; forma, form). Spiral; shaped like a snail-shell.
  • Helicina (hel-is' -in-ah) . A mixture of snail mucus and -sugar; a white powder, soluble in water, and used as a pectoral remedy. Syn., Saccharated snail-juice.
  • Helicine (hel'-is-in) (helix). 1. Spiral in struc- ture. 2. Pertaining to the helix. H. Arteries, spirally winding arteries supplying the erec- tile tissue of the penis.
  • Helicoid (hel' -ik-oid) (helix; eloof, form). Spiral; coiled like a snail-shell.
  • Helicoproteid (hel-ik-o-pro' -te-id) . A phospho- glycoproteid obtained from the glands of the snail, Helix pomatia. It is converted by action of alkalis into a gummy, levorotatory carbohydrate called animal sinistrin.
  • Helicotrema (hel-ik-o-tre f -mah) (helix; xprjpa, hole). The opening connecting the scalse tympani and vestibuli of the spiral canal of the cochlea.
  • Heliophilia (he-le-oj-iV -e-ah) (tjXcoc, sun; c\e~cv, to love). Morbid affinity for the sun- light, resulting in ecstacy and muscular con- traction.
  • Heliophobia (he-le-o-fo' -be-ah) (helios; acoc, dusky). A brown coloring-matter from blood, regarded as a decomposition-product of hematin.
  • Hemapoiesis (hem-ap-oi-e' -sis) . See Hem- atopoiesis.
  • Hemapoietic (hem-ap-oi-ef '-ik) . See Hema- topoietic.
  • Hemarthrosis (hem -ar - thro' - sis) (hema-; apdpov, a joint). Effusion of blood into a joint.
  • Hemastatics (hem-as-taf -iks) (hema-; axazcKog, standing). That branch of physiology treat- ing of the laws of the equilibrium of the blood.
  • Hematachometer (hem-at-ak-om' -et-er) . See Hemotachometer .
  • Hematalloscopy (hem-at-al-os' '-ko-pe) (hema-; aXXog, other; anone'cv, to examine). In medi- cal jurisprudence the examination of the blood to distinguish one kind from another.
  • Hematein (hem-at-e' '-in) (alfia, blood), C 16 H 12 O e . A crystalline principle derived from, and reconvertible into, hematoxylin. H. -ammo- nium, C 10 H 9 O 5 . NH 4 + 4H 2 0, a violet-black granular powder, purple in aqueous solution, brown-red in alcoholic solution, used as a stain.
  • Hematemesis (hem - at - em' - es - is) (hema-; emesis, to vomit). The vomiting of blood.
  • Hematherapy (hem -ah- ther' - ap ~ e) (hema-; depaizn'ca, therapy). 1. The therapeutic use of prepared arterial blood of bullocks. 2. Treatment applied to diseases of the blood.
  • Hematic (hem-at'-ik) (alfia, blood). Bloody; pertaining to, full of, or having the color of, blood.
  • Hematidrosis (hem -at- id - ro' - sis) (hema-, Ydpioc, sweat). A sweating of blood.
  • Hematimeter (hem-at-im' -et-er) (hema-; pttcpov, a measure). An instrument for counting the corpuscles in a given volume of blood.
  • Hematinic (hem-at-in'-ik) (hematin). 1. Same as Hematic. 2. Relating to hematin. 3. An agent which tends to increase the proportion of hematin or coloring-matter in the blood. Hematinometer (hem-at-in-om' -et-er) . Same as Hemoglobinometer.
  • Hematinuria (hem-at-in-u' -re-ah) . Same as Hemoglobinuria.
  • Hematobium (hem-at-o' -be-um) (hemato-; /?/of, life). 1. A blood-corpuscle. 2. A blood- parasite.
  • Hematoblast (hem'-at-o-blast) (hemato-; /3Xaor6c, a germ). A blood-plate; an immature red blood-corpuscle.
  • Hematocathartic (hem-at-o-kath-ar'-tik) (hem- ato-; KadapuKoc, cleansing). 1. Purifying the blood. 2. Any remedy that purifies the blood.
  • Hematocele (hem'-at-o-sel) (hemato-; ktjXtj, a tumor). A tumor formed by the extrava- sation and collection of blood in a part, espe- cially in the tunica vaginalis testis or in the pelvic cavity (pelvic hematocele).
  • Hematocephalus (hem-at-o-se)' -al-us) (hem- ato-; Keaf£~cv, to eat). Feeding on blood; blood-sucking.
  • Hematophyte (hem f -at-o-jlt) (hemato-; fyozbv, a plant). A vegetable organism, such as a bacterium, living in the blood.
  • Hematoplastic (hem-at-o-plas 1 '-tik) (hemato-; TzlaaxtKoc, plastic). Blood-forming..
  • Hematopoiesis (hem - at - o - poi - e' -sis) (hem- ato-; novate, a making). The formation of blood.
  • Hematopoietic (hem - at - o - poi - el'-ik) (see Hematopoiesis). Relating to the processes of blood-making. H. Organs, the blood-making organs.
  • Hematoporphyrin (hem-at-o-por'-fe-rin) (hem- ato-; 7iop, scrotum; ktjAt), tumor). A hemor- rhagic tumor or distention of the scrotum.
  • Hematoscope (hem' -at-o - skop) (hemato-; oKone'cv, to view). An instrument used in the spectroscopic examination of the blood, by means of which the thickness of the layer of blood can be regulated.
  • Hematoscopy (hem-at-os' '-ko-pe) (see Hemato- scope). Visual examination of the blood; examination of the blood by means of the hematoscope.
  • Hematosepsis (hem-at-o-sep' -sis) (hemato-; ot)!c, putrefaction). Septicemia.
  • Hematosis (hem-at-o' -sis) (at/xa, blood). The process of the formation of blood and the development of blood-corpuscles.
  • Hematospermia (hem-at-o-sper' '-me-ah) (hem- ato-; onepfxa, seed). The discharge of bloody semen.
  • Hematothorax (hem -at-o- tho' - raks) . See Hemothorax.
  • Hematotic (hem-at-ot' -ik) . Relating to hema- tosis.
  • Hematoxic (hem-at-oks' -ik) (hemato-; to£oc6v, a poison). Pertaining to a poisoned or impure state of the blood.
  • Hematoxylin (hem-at-oks' -il-in) (hemato-; £ f Aov, wood), C 16 H 14 6 . The coloring-matter of logwood. It is a crystalline substance and is used as a stain in microscopy.
  • Hematozemia (hem-at-o-ze' -me-ah) (hemato-; tjiiica, a loss). A gradual or periodic dis- charge of blood.
  • Hematozoon (hem-at-o-zo' -on) (hemato-; £c3oy, animal; pi., hematozoa). Any animal parasite in the blood. Haematozoon malariae, a hyaline ameboid body found in the blood of malarial patients.
  • Hematozymosis (hem-at-o-zi-mo' -sis) (hemato-; ^biuoacg, fermentation). Fermentation of the blood.
  • Hematropin (hem-af -ro-pin) . Phenylglycolyl- tropein; a fluid preparation of hemoglobin.
  • Hematuresis (hem-at-u-re' -sis) (see Hematuria). The passage of bloody urine.
  • Hemautography (hem-aw-tog' -ra-fe) (aljia, blood; auTOf, self; ypafotv, to write). The trac- ing produced by a jet of blood from a divided artery caught upon paper drawn in front of it.
  • Hemelytrometra (hem-el-it-ro-me' -trah) (alLta, blood; eXoxpov, a sheath; jiyzpa, uterus). An ac- cumulation of blood in the uterus and vagina.
  • Hemeralopia (hem-er-al-o' -pe-ah) (y/J-epa, day; to, eye). Day-vision or night-blindness; a symptom of pigmentary degeneration of the retina, failure of general nutrition, etc. Vision is good by day or in a strong light, but fails at night. See Nyctalopia.
  • Hemeropathia (hem-er-o-path' -e-ah) (yLiepa, day; nadoc, disease). 1. Any disease lasting but one day. 2. A disease that is more severe during the day.
  • Hemiablepsia (hem-e-ab-lep' -se-ah) . See Hemi- anopia.
  • Hemiacephalia (hem-e-ah-sej-a' -le-ah) (hemi-; a, priv.; KeaXi), head). A monstrosity having a shapeless tumor representing the head, in which portions of the encephalon are con- tained. Syn., Acephalia spuria; Hypaceph- alia.
  • Hemiachromatopsia (hem -e-ah- kro - mat - op'- se-ah) (hemi-; a, priv.; %pojp.a, color; o(ptc, vision). Color-blindness in one-half of the field of vision.
  • Hemiageusia (hem-e-ah-gu' -se-ah) (hemi-; a, priv.; ytbotg, taste). One-sided loss or diminution of the sense of taste.
  • Hemialbumin (hem-e-aV '-bu-min) . See Antial- bumin.
  • Hemialbuminose (hem-e-al-bu'-min-os). The same as Hemialbumose.
  • Hemialbumose (hem-e-aV '-bu-mos) (hemi-; albumen, the white of egg). The most char- acteristic and most frequently obtained by- product of proteid digestion. It is the fore- runner of hemipeptcne.
  • Hemialgia (hem-e-al' -je-ah) (hemi-; aXyoc, pain). Unilateral neuralgia.
  • Hemiamaurosis (hem-e-am-aw-ro' -sis) (hemi-; amaurosis). A form of transitory blindness in which hemianopia is combined with amblyo- pia in the other half of the visual field.
  • Hemiamblyopia (hem-e-am-ble-o' -pe-ah) . See Hemianopia.
  • Hemianalgesia (hem -e -an - al- je' -ze- ah) (hemi-; dv, priv.; alyog, pain). Insensibility to pain throughout one lateral half of the body and limbs.
  • Hemiarthrosis (hem-e-ar -thro' -sis) (hemi-; apdpajocf, a joining). A false synchondrosis.
  • Hemiataxia (hem-e-at-aks' -e-ah) (hemi-; a, priv.; ra&c, order). Ataxia limited to one side of the body.
  • Hemiathetosis (hem-e-ath-et-o' -sis) (hemi-; adezof, without fixed position). Athetosis of one side of the body.
  • Hemiatonia (hem-e-at-o' -ne-ah) (hemi-; dzov'ca, want of tone). Diminution or loss of muscu- lar or vital energy in one-half of the body. H. apoplectica, hemihypertonia postapo- plectica.
  • Hemiatrophy (hem-e-at'-ro-fe) (hemi-; dzpo- (f>ia, lack of nourishment). Atrophy confined to one side of the body.
  • Hemic (hem'-ik) (alfia, blood). Pertaining to or developed by the blood.
  • Hemicellulose (hem - e-sel' -u- Ids) (hemi-; cellula, a little cell). A term for all the carbo- hydrates in the cell-wall which are not colored blue by chlorzinc iodid.
  • Hemicephalus (hem - e-sej' - a - lus) (hemi-; KscjiaXrj, head). A monster in which the cere- bral hemispheres and skull are lacking.
  • Hemichorea (hem - e - ko - re' -ah) (hemi-; %opsca, chorea). A form of chorea in which the convulsive movements are confined to one side of the body.
  • Hemichromanopsia (hem-e-kro-man-op' -se-ah) . See Hemiachromatopsia.
  • Hemichromosome (hem-e-kro' -mo-som) (hemi-; chromosome). The body formed by the longitudinal splitting of the chromosome.
  • Hemicrania (hem - e - kra' -ne-ah) (hemi-; npavcov, head), i. Neuralgia of one-half of the head; migraine. 2. Imperfect develop- ment or absence of the anterior or posterior part of the skull.
  • Hemicraniectomy (hem - e -kra - ne - ek'-lo-me) (hemi-; craniectomy). Doyen's operation of sectioning the cranial vault near the mesial line, from before backward, and pressing the entire side outward to expose one-half of the brain.
  • Hemoglobinorrhea (hem - o - glo - bin-or-e' -ah) (hemoglobin; pom, a flow). The escape of hemoglobin from the blood-vessels. Haemo- globinorrhoea cutis, an effusion of hemo- globin into the skin, due to venous engorge- ment.
  • Hemogregarina (hem-o-greg-ar-e' -nah) (hemo-; Gregarina, a genus of Protozoa). Gregarine- like bodies found in the blood of persons affected with malaria.
  • Hemohydronephrosis (hem-o-hi-dro-nef-ro r -sis) (hemo-; udcop, water; v£(ppog, kidney). A cystic tumor of the kidney with blood and urine in the contents.
  • Hemokelidosis (hem-o-kel-id-o 1 '-sis) (hemo-; kt)\coouv, to stain). Contamination of the blood; purpura.
  • Hemol (hem'-ol) (a pa, blood). A dark -brown powder obtained by the action of zinc upon defibrinated blood, and said to contain i % of soluble iron. Dose in anemia i6 gr. (0.1-0.5 Gm.).
  • Hemology (hem-ol'-o-je) (hemo-; Xbyoc, sci- ence). The science treating of the blood.
  • Hemolysis (hem-oV -is-is) . See Hematolysis.
  • Hemolytic (hem-ol-it' -ik) . See Hematolytic.
  • Hemomanometer (hem - - man - om' - et - er) (hemo-; pavoc, thin; pkxpov, a measure). A manometer used in estimating blood-pres- sure.
  • Hemomere (hem'-o-mer) (hemo-; pepoc, a part). A portion of a metamere derived from the vascular system or taking part in its formation.
  • Hemometer (hem-om' -et-er) . See Hemoglo- binometer.
  • Hemometra (hem-o-me' -trah) . See Hemato- melra.
  • Hemometrectasia (hem - - met-rek - ta' - ze - ah) (hemo-; prjrpa, uterus; hixaacg, a stretching). Dilation of the uterus from effusion of blood into its cavity.
  • Hemopathology (hem-o -path-oV '-o-je) (hemo-; pathology). The pathology of the blood.
  • Hemopexia (hem-o-peks'-e-ah) (hemo-; iz^cg, a fixing). A general name for diseases char- acterized by a tendency of the blood to coagu- late.
  • Hemopexin (hem-o-peks'-in). A ferment capa- ble of coagulating blood.
  • Hemophilia (hem-o-fiV -e-ah) (hemo-; aye~cv, to eat). A giant -cell peculiar to the liver, which is said to destroy liver-cells.
  • Hepatophlebitis (hep-at-o-fleb-i' -tis) (hepato-; phlebitis). Inflammation of the veins of the liver.
  • Hepatophlebotomy (hep -at-o-fleb- ot'-o-me) (hepato-; r), suture). Suture- of the liver.
  • Hepatorrhea (hep-at-or-e'^ah) (hepato-; poca, flow). Morbid or excessive secretion of bile by the liver.
  • Hepatorrhexis (hep-at-or-eks' -is) (hepato-; pfj^cc, a rupture). Rupture of the liver.
  • Hepatostomy (he p-at-os' -to-me) (hepato-; ozojia, a mouth). The establishment in the liver- substance of communication between parts of the liver obstructed by concretions.
  • Hepatotomy (hep-at-of -o-me) (hepato-; zkjivecv, to cut). Incision of the liver.
  • Hepatotoxemia (hep-at-o-toks-e' '-me-ah) (hep- ato-; toxemia). Toxemia due to disturbance of the hepatic functions.
  • Hepatotoxin (hep-at-o-toks'-in) (hepato-; zo^ckov, a poison). A cytotoxin found by E. Metch- nikoff in the liver.
  • Hephestic (hef-es'-tik) ('Hcfraiozoc, Vulcan) Prevailing or occurring among hammermen, as hephestic cramp.
  • Hephestiorrhaphy (he-fes-te-or'-af-e) ("H^Wcr- ror, Vulcan; pacprj, a seam). The applica- tion of the actual cautery to the edges of a wound to bring about adhesion.
  • Heptad (hep'-tad) (knza, seven). An element having a quantivalence of seven.
  • Heptadicity (hep-tad-is' -it-e) (see Heptad). Septivalence.
  • Heptane (hep' -tan) (see Heptad), C 7 H 16 . A liquid hydrocarbon of the paraffin group, contained in petroleum and also obtained from the resin of Pinus sabiniana by dry distillation. Syn., Abietene.
  • Herb (erb) (herba, an herb). A plant the stem of which contains but little wood and dies down to the ground at the end of the season.
  • Herbivorous (her - biv' - or - us) (herb; vorare, to devour). Living on vegetable food.
  • Hereditation (her -ed- it - a' - shun) (heredity). The effect or influence of heredity.
  • Heredity (he-red' -it-e) (hereditas, heredity). The transmission of physical or mental quali- ties or tendencies from ancestor to offspring; the principle or force by reason of which the offspring resembles the parent.
  • Heredo- (her-e-do-) . In composition, hereditary.
  • Hermaphrodism, Hermaphroditism (her- nial' -ro-dizm, her-maf'-ro-di-tizm) (Ep/mf^, Mercury; 'Ap.a, color) 1. Pigmentation of the skin due to substances foreign to the body. 2. See Heterochromia.
  • Hetero scope (het'-er-o-skop) (hetero-; okotzuv, to examine). An apparatus for the accurate measurement of the various angles at which a deviating eye in strabismus can see.
  • Heterochromia (h&t-er-o-kro'-me-ah) (see HETEROCHYLIA 483 HETEROTROPHIA Heterochromatosis). A difference in color, as of the irises of the two eyes, or, different parts of the same iris.
  • Heterochylia (het-er-o-ki'-le-ah) (hetero-; %uX6c, chyle). A variable condition of the gastric contents, changing suddenly from normal acidity to hyperacidity or anacidity.
  • Heterocrisis (het-er-o-kri'-sis) (hetero- ; up to eg, a crisis). An abnormal crisis in disease.
  • Heterodesmotic (het-er-o-dez-mot'-ik) (hetero-; deajwc, a bond). Connecting other parts; applied to nerve-fibers connecting centers of unequal value or associating nervous centers with other parts.
  • Heterodymus (het-er-od' -im-us) (hetero-; dedu- p.oc, twin). A double monster, the accessory part being but an imperfect head, with a neck and thorax by which it is implanted in the anterior abdominal wall of its host.
  • Heteroepidermic (het - er - o - e.p - e - der r - mik). Pertaining to or taken from the skin of some other person; a form of skin-grafting.
  • Heteroganglionic (het-er-o-gan-gle-on'-ik) . Re- lating to different ganglions; applied to the connecting nerve-fibers between ganglions. , Heterogeneous (het - er - o - je' - ne - us) (hetero-; ykvoc, kind). Differing in kind or nature; composed of different substances; not homo- geneous.
  • Heterogenesis (het - er -o - jen' - es - is) (hetero-; ykvzctg, generation). A mode of reproduction in which the living parent gives rise to off- spring that pass through totally different series of states from those exhibited by the parents, and do not return into the cycle of the parents.
  • Heteroglaucous (het-er-o-glaw' '-kus) (hetero-; yXauKoc, bluish- green), i. Having one eye blue and the other black or gray. 2. Re- lating to the anomalous production of greenish or glaucous spots.
  • Heteroid, Heteroideous (het'-er-oid, -oid'-e-us) (erspoc, other). Formed diversely; applied to inclosed structures which differ from their investment.
  • Heteroinoculation (het-er-o-in-ok-u-la' '-shun) (hetero-; inoculation). Inoculation of one person by another.
  • Heterologous (het-er-oV -o-gus) (hetero-; Xbyoc, relation). Differing in structure or form from the normal. H. Tumors, tumors constituted of a tissue different from that of the part in or on which they are situated.
  • Heterolysin (het-er-oV -is-in) (hetero-; Xbatc, solution). A lysin produced in the body of one species of animal by the introduction of blood from a different species. Cf. Isolysin.
  • Heterolysis (het-er-oV -is-is) (see Heterolysin). The hemolytic action of the blood-serum of one animal upon the corpuscles of another species. Cf. Isolysis. Heterometry (het-er-om' -et-re) (hetero-; jihpov, a measure). Deviation from the normal state in a part, in regard to the amount of its contents.
  • Heteromfection (het-er-o-in-iek' '-shun) (hetero-; infection). 1. Infection transmitted by a per- son who is himself not affected. 2. Infection of any organism by a poison not produced within itself; opposed to autoinfection.
  • Heteromorphous (het-er-o-mor' -jus) (hetero-; p.opT)fir), utterance). The saying of one thing while another is intended.
  • Heterophoralgia (het-er-o-for-al'-je-ah) (hetero- phoria; aXyoc, pain). Eye-strain or ocular pain caused by heterophoria.
  • Heterophthalmos (het-er-of -thai' -mos). See Heterochromia.
  • Heteroplasia (het-er-o-pla' -ze-ah) (hetero-; nXaooecv, to form). The presence, in a part, of a tissue that does not belong there normally.
  • Heteroplasm (het'-er-o-plazm) (see Hetero- plasia). Abnormal or false tissue.
  • Heteroplasty (het'-er-o-plas-te) (see Hetero- plasia). 1. Heteroplasia. 2. The operation of grafting parts taken from another species.
  • Heteroproteose (het-er-o-pro'-te-oz) . A product of the digestion of syntonin in the stomach.
  • Heteroptics (het-er-op' -tiks) (hetero-; 6tlxckoc, belonging to sight), 1. Clairvoyance. 2. Perverted vision.
  • Heterotaxis (het-er-o-taks'-is) (hetero-; ra&c, order). The anomalous disposition or trans- position of organs.
  • Heterotopia (het-er-o-to' -pe-ah) (hetero-; totcoc, place). A misplacement of normal tissue, especially a congenital malformation of the brain, in which masses of gray matter are found transplanted into the white.
  • Heterotrichous (het-er-ot' -rik-us) (hetero-; dp'c£, hair). Furnished with two kinds of cilia.
  • Heterotrophia, Heterotrophy (het-er-o-tro'- fe-ah, het-er-ot'-ro-fe) (hetero-; rpocfir), sus- HETEROTROPIA 484 HIGHMORE, ANTRUM OF tenance). Any perversion or disorder of nutrition.
  • Heterotropia (het-er-o-trop' -e-ah) . See Strabis- mus.
  • Heterotypus (het-er-o-ti'-pus) (heiero-; xbnog, a type). A double monster having the parasitic fetus hanging from the ventral wall of the principal subject.
  • Heterovalvate (het-er-o-vaV -vat) (hetero-; valva, valve). Having two kinds of valves.
  • Heteroxanthin (het - er - o - zan' - thin) (hetero-; $avdoc, yellow), C 6 H 6 N 4 2 . A leukomain that can be isolated in crystalline form from urine.
  • Heteroxeny (het-er-oks' '-en-e) (hetero-; ^evog, a guest). The quality of living upon dif- ferent hosts. Cf . Heterecism.
  • Hetocresol, Hetokresol (het-o-kre'-sol). See Cinnamyl-metacresol.
  • Hetoform (het'-o-form). Bismuth cinnamate.
  • Hetol (het'-ol) See Sodium Cinnamate.
  • Hexa- (heks-ah-) (is cif , six). A prefix signifying six.
  • Hexad (heks'-ad) (Ifaf, six). An element the atom of which has a quantivalence of six.
  • Hexadactylism (heks-ah-dak 1 '-til-izm) (hexa-; oaKTuXoc, a finger). Having six fingers or toes.
  • Hexahydrohematoporphyrin (heks-ah-hi-dro- hem-at-o-por 1 '-fi-rin) . A reduction-product of hematin.
  • Hexamethylenamin (heks-ah-meth-il-en'-am- in), C 6 H 12 N 4 , the hexamethylenamina of the U. S. P., a condensation-product obtained by the action of ammonia on formaldehyd. Syn., H examethylenetetramin; Urotropin.
  • Hexane (heks'-an) (leaf, six), C 6 H 14 . The sixth member of the paraffin series of hydro- carbons. It is a liquid, boiling at about 71 C, found in various natural oils.
  • Hexatomic (heks-at-om f -ik) (hexa-; drofioc, an atom). Consisting of six atoms; also ap- plied to atoms that are hexavalent, and to alcohols or other compounds having six re- placeable hydrogen atoms.
  • Hexavalent (heks-av' -al-ent) (hexa-; valens, hav- ing power). Having the same combining power as six hydrogen atoms.
  • Hexoses (heks-o'-sez) (i?af , six). The aldehyd or ketone derivatives of the hexhydric alcohols.
  • Hiant (hi f -ant) (hiare, to gape). Yawning; gaping; opening by a fissure.
  • Hiccup, Hiccough (hik'-up) (Dan., hikke, to hiccup). A spasmodic contraction of the dia- phragm causing inspiration, followed by a sud- den closure of the glottis. Syn., Singultus.
  • Hicks' (Braxton) Sign. Intermittent uterine contractions beginning at the end of the third month of pregnancy; they may also be pro- duced by tumors distending the uterus.
  • Hidradenitis, Hidroadenitis (hi-drad-en-i'-tis, hi-dro-ad-en-i'-tis). See Hidrosadenitis. H. suppurativa, a condition marked by the for- mation of tumors the size of a pea which tend to develop into abscesses.
  • Hidradenoma (hi - drad - en - o' - mah) (lopojc, sweat; adenoma. Hyperplasia of an existing inflammatory tumor of a sweat-gland.
  • Hidropoiesis (hid-ro-poi-e'-sis) (lopcog, sweat; 7toi7)oc£, formation). The formation of sweat.
  • Hidropoietic (hid-ro-poi-et' -ik) (see Hidro- poiesis'). Relating to hidropoiesis.
  • Hidrose (hi'-dros) (Idpoog, sweat). Relating to sweat.
  • Hidrosis (hid-ro' -sis) (see Hidrose) 1. The formation and excretion of sweat. 2. Ab- normally profuse sweating. 3. Any skin dis- ease marked by disorder of the sweat-glands.
  • Hiera-picra (hi-er-ah-pi'-krah) (L., "sacred bitters"). Powder of aloes and canella.
  • Hieromania (hi-er-o-ma' -ne-ah) (hpdf, sacred; (tavca, madness). Religious frenzy.
  • Hilum, Hilus (hi'-lum, hi'-lus) (L., "a little thing"). A pit, recess, or opening in an organ, usually for the entrance and exit of vessels or ducts.
  • Hinge-joint (hinj' -joint). See Diarthrosis.
  • Hippocampal (hip-o-kam f -paT) (see Hippo- campus). Relating to the hippocampus.
  • Hippocampus (hip-o-kam'-pus) (jtztzoc, horse; kclhtzoc, a sea-monster). A name applied to two elevations, hippocampus major and hippocampus minor, the former situated in the middle, and the latter in the posterior, horn of the ventricles of the brain.
  • Hippuric Acid (hip-u' -rik) . See Acid, Hip- puric. H. Acid, Reaction for. See Luecke's Reaction for Hippuric Acid.
  • Hippus (hip'-us) (ctlTlOc, horse, from analogy to the movements of this animal). Spasmodic pupillary movement, independent of the ac- tion of light.
  • Hirsute (her-suf) (hirsutus, shaggy). Shaggy; hairy.
  • Hirsuties (her-su'-te-ez) (see Hirsute). Exces- sive growth of hair.
  • Histidin (his'-tid-in), C 6 H 9 N 3 2 . A base present among the hydrolytic products of casein, albumin, blood-serum, and horn, and a constant cleavage-product of the more complex plant and animal proteids.
  • Histin (his'-tin) (loz'cov, a web). Fibrin.
  • Histioid (his' -te-oid) . See Histoid.
  • Histioma (his-ti-o'-mah) (lax'cov, a web; b/j.a, a tumor). A tissue tumor in which distinct tissues may be recognized, but which do not arrange themselves to form organs.
  • Histo- (his-to-) (co~6c, tissue). A prefix denot- ing relation to tissue.
  • Histoblast (his'-to-bJast) (histo-; filaoxoc, a germ). A cell engaged in the formation of tissue.
  • Histochemistry (his - to - kern' - is - ire) (histo- chemistry). The chemistry of the histo- logic elements of the body.
  • Histodialysis (his - to - di - al' - is-is) (histo,- dcaXuocc, dissolution). The dissolution of or- ganic tissue.
  • Histofluorescence (his-to-flu-or-es f -enz) . The administration of fluorescing drugs during roentgen-ray treatment.
  • Histogenesis (his-to-jen'-es-is) (histo-; yheacg, generation). The formation of tissues.
  • Histohematin (his-to- hem' - at-in) (histo-; alp.a, blood). A pig- ment found in mus- cles, suprarenal cap- sules, and other organs, and believed to have a respiratory function.
  • Histoid (his'-toid) (his- to-; eldoc, likeness). Composed of only one kind of tissue.
  • Histologic (his-to-lof- ik) (see Histology). Relating to histology.
  • Histology (his-toV -o-je) \Jiisto-; Xoyoc;, science). The minute anatomy of tissues. H., Nor- mal, the study of sound tissues. H., Pathologic, the study of diseased tissues. H., Topographic, the study of the minute structure of the organs and es- pecially of their formation from the tissues.
  • Histolysis (his-toV -is-is) (histo-; Xuacc, dis- solution). Disintegration and dissolution of organic tissue.
  • Histon (his'-ton) (coxoc, tissue). A proteid prepared from the nuclei of cells. It be- longs to the group of proteids known as albumoses or propeptones.
  • Histonomy (his - ton' - o - me) (histo- ; vdfioc, a law). The laws of the development and arrangement of organic tissue.
  • Histopathology (his-to-path-ol' -o-je) (histo-; pathology). The study of minute patho- logic changes in tissues.
  • Histophysiology (his-to-fiz-e-ol'-o-je) (histo-; physiology). The science of the functions of the various tissues.
  • Histopsyche (his-to-si'-ke) (histo-; (po^rj, soul). The tissue soul; according to Haeckel, the higher psychologic function which gives psychologic individuality to the compound multicellular organism as a true cell commonwealth.
  • Histotherapeutics, Histotherapy (his-to- ther-ap-u'-tiks, his-to-ther' -ap-e) (histo-; d spans ca, therapy). The remedial use of animal tissues.
  • Histotome (his' -to-tdm) (histo-; xsjivscv, to cut). An apparatus for cutting tissue for the study of its minute structure; a microtome.
  • Histotomy (his-tot'-o-me) (see Histotome). The dissection of tissues.
  • Hives (hlvz) (origin uncertain), i. Urticaria. 2. In Great Britain the term is also applied to croup, laryngitis, and chicken-pox.
  • Hoarhound, Horehound (hor'-hownd). See Marrubium.
  • Hollyhock (hoi' -e-hok) . See Althea.
  • Holocain (hol-o-ka'-in). A crystalline com- bination of paraphenetidin and acetphenetidin. The hydrochlorate is employed as an anes- thetic in ophthalmic practice in 1 % solution.
  • Holocrine (hol'-o-kren) (bXoc, whole; npivtiv, to separate). Applied to a gland the cell of which, after having elaborated the material of secretion, falls into disuse and disappears. Cf. Merocrine.
  • Holorachischisis (hoi - - rak - is' - kis - is) (bXoc, whole; fal^-) spinal column; okc%£~cv, to cleave). A congenital absence of the ver- tebral canal.
  • Holotopic (hol-ot'-op-ik) (bXoc, whole; totzoc; place). Pertaining to the relation of a part to the entire organism.
  • Holotopy (hol-ot'-o-pe). Waldeyer's term for the relation of a part or organ to the whole organism. Cf. Idiotopy; Skeletotopy; Syn- topy.
  • Holzin (holt'-zin). Formaldehyd in a' 60% solution in methyl-alcohol. An antiseptic and disinfectant.
  • Holzinol (holt' -zin-ol) . A solution of form- aldehyd in methyl-alcohol containing a small proportion of menthol. Antiseptic and dis- infectant.
  • Homeo- (ho-me-o) (buococ, like). A prefix sig- nifying likeness.
  • Homeochronous (ho-me-o-kro'-nus) (homeo-; Xpovoc, time). Similar in time or peri- odicity.
  • Homeosemous (Jiom -e - o - se' - mus) (homeo-; orjfislov, a sign). Similar in import: applied to symptoms.
  • Homo- (ho-mo-). See Homeo-.
  • Homocentric (ho - mo - sen' - trik) (homo-; Kkvxpov, center). Concentric; having the same center. H. Rays, light rays that have a common focus or are parallel.
  • Homocerebrin (ho - mo - ser' -e- brin) (homo-; cerebrum). A substance derived from brain tissue, closely resembling cerebrin, but more soluble in alcohol.
  • Homoeo- (ho-me-o-) . For words thus beginning see Homeo-.
  • Homogeneous (ho - mo - je' -ne- us) (homo-; ykvog, kind). Having the same nature or qualities; having a uniform character in all parts.
  • Homogenesis (ho - mo - jen' - es - is) (homo-; fkveocc, birth). Reproduction in which a parent gives rise to offspring that pass through the same cycle of changes as itself.
  • Homolog, Homologue (ho'-mo-log) (homo-; Xoyoc, proportion). An organ which has the same relative structure, position, or develop- ment as another. The same organ in differ- ent organisms under every variety of form and function.
  • Homology (ho-moV -o-je) (see Homolog). The quality of being homologous; also, the mor- phologic identity of parts or organs in dif- ferent animals.
  • Homomerous (ho-mom'-er-us) (homo-; p.kpoc, a part). Having the parts alike.
  • Homoplastic (ho - mo - plas' - tik) (homo-; izlaoxbc, formed). Applied to newgrowths in which there has been no cytomorphosis, the cells resembling those of the parent tissue, as in angioma and glioma.
  • Homothermic (ho - mo - ther' - mik) (homo-; dkpiirj, heat). Having a uniform temperature.
  • Homotonic (ho-mo-ton'-ik) (homo-; xbvoc, tone; tension). Having a uniform or even course. Homotype (ho' -mo-tip) (homo-; runoc, a pat- tern). A part corresponding and similar to another part, as the humerus to the femur.
  • Honduras Bark (hon - du' - ras) . Cascara amarga.
  • Honthin, Hontin (hon' -thin, -tin) (named from the town of the discoverer). A proprietary, odorless, tasteless preparation, said to consist of tannin, albumin, and keratin; an intestinal astringent. Dose 8-20 gr. (0.5-1.3 Gm.) 2 or 3 times daily; infants, 4-5 gr. (0.25-0.32 Gm.) 4 times daily.
  • Hordeolum (hor-de'-o-lum) (hordeum). A sty; a furuncular inflammation of the connective tissue of the lids, near a hair-follicle. H. externum. SeeZeissianSty. H. internum. See Meibomian Sty.
  • Hordeum (hor'-de-um) (L.). Barley.
  • Horismascope (hor-iz' -mah-skop) (opcap.a, a determination; okotzsIv, to examine). An instrument designed for the detection of albumin, peptones, biliary constituents, etc., in urine.
  • Horizontal (hor-iz-on'-tal) (bpc^oov, the horizon). Parallel to the horizon.
  • Horny (hor'-ne) (horn). Composed of or re- sembling horn.
  • Horopter (hor-op'-ter) (opoc, boundary; onriip, an observer). The sum of all the points seen singly by the two retinas while the fixation- point remains stationary.
  • Horripilation (hor-ip-il-a' '-shun) (horrere, to stand on end; pilus, the hair). Erection of the hairs of the skin produced by the con- traction of the arrectores pili muscles.
  • Horseweed. 1. Collinsonia canadensis, an indigenous plant, the root of which (in de- coction) is used in cystitis, leukorrhea, dropsy, gravel, etc. 2. Erigeron canadense.
  • Hospital (hos'-pit-al) (hospes, a guest). A building for the care and treatment of sick or infirm persons. H. Gangrene, a conta- gious, phagedenic gangrene occasionally at- tacking wounds or open sores. It is confined mainly to military hospitals, and is of mi- crobic origin.
  • Hospitalism (hos'-pit-al-izm) (hospital). The morbid conditions arising from the gathering of diseased persons in a hospital.
  • Host (host) (hostis, a stranger; a landlord). The organic body upon which parasites live.
  • Hottentotism (hot'-en-tot-izm). An extreme form of congenital stammering.
  • Humanized (hu'-man-izd). Applied to viruses which have passed through a human being.
  • Humeral (hu'-mer-al) (humerus). Pertaining to the humerus.
  • Humerus (hu'-mer-us) (L.). The bone of the upper arm.
  • Humpback, Hunchback (hump'-bak, hunch'- bak). See Kyphosis.
  • Hunger (hung'-ger) (AS., hungor). A condition marked by a sensation of emptiness of the stomach, with a longing for food. H.-cure, treatment by fasting.
  • Hunyadi Janos Water (hun-yah'-de yah'-nos). An aperient mineral ^ water from Hungary, containing potassium, sodium, and magnesium sulfates, sodium chlorid and carbonate, iron oxid, and alumina.
  • Huygenian Ocular (hi-je' -ne-an) . See . Ocular, Huygenian.
  • Hyalin (hi'-al-in) (paXoc, glass). A translucent substance forming the walls of hydatid cysts.
  • Hyaline (hi'-al-in) (see Hyalin). Resembling glass. H. Cartilage. See Cartilage, Hya- line. H. Cast, H. Cylinder, a clear, nearly transparent urinary tube-cast. H. Degenera- tion. See Degeneration, Hyaline.
  • Hyalitis (hi-al-i' -tis) (hyaloid; crcc, inflamma- tion). Inflammation of the hyaloid mem- brane of the vitreous humor.
  • Hyalo- (hi-al-o-) (ualoc, glass). A prefix mean- ing: 1. Transparent. 2. Relating to hyalin.
  • Hyalogen (hi-al'-o-jen) (hyalo-; ytvvav, to pro- duce). An albuminoid found in cartilage. It is readily changed into hyalin.
  • Hyaloma (hi-al-o' -mah) (hyalo-; ofia, a tumor). The conversion of the eye into a hyaline mass.
  • Hyaloplasm (hi'-al-o-plazm) (hyalo-; nXaofia, plasm). The fluid portion of the protoplasm of a living cell.
  • Hyaloserositis (hi-al-o-se-ro-si' -tis) (hyalo-; serosa; mq, inflammation). Chronic inflam- mation of the serous membranes with forma- tion of a dense, fibrous hyaline investment in certain regions.
  • Hyalosome (hi'-al-o- som) (hyalo-; otifxa, body). A body resembling a nucleolus, but staining slightly by either nuclear or plas- matic dyes.
  • Hybometer (hi-bom' -et-er) (ufloc, humpbacked; (xkzpov, a measure). An apparatus for measur- ing pathologic gibbosities.
  • Hybrid (hi'-brid) (uj3ptc, insult). The offspring of two individuals of distinct but closely related species.
  • Hydantoin (hi-dan-to'-in), C 3 H 4 N 2 2 . Gly- colyl urea. A crystalline substance derived from allantoin and related to urea.
  • Hydatism (hi-dat'-izm) (udojp, water). The sound caused by the moving of pathologic fluid in a body cavity.
  • Hydatoid (hi-dat'-oid) (hydatid; ddoc-, like- ness), i. Hydatidif orm. 2. Watery. 3. The aqueous humor.
  • Hydra-, Hydro- (hi-drah-, hi-dro-) (udojp, water). Prefixes signifying the presence of water or of hydrogen.
  • Hydracetin (hi-dras' -et-in), C 6 H 5 N 2 H 2 (C 2 H 3 0). A coal-tar derivative. It is antipyretic and anti- rheumatic. Dose \-2 gr. (0.032-0.13 Gm.).
  • Hydracid (hi-dras' -id) (hydra-; acidum, acid). An acid formed by a combination of hydrogen and an acid element or radicle other than oxygen.
  • Hydradenomes (hi - drad' -en- omz) (hydra-; adrjv, gland). A skin disease marked by the formation of papules, varying in size from that of a pin-head to that of a pea, without subjective symptoms. It is attributed to adenoid epithelioma of the sweat-glands.
  • Hydraemia (hi-dre' -me-ah) . See Hydremia.
  • Hydraeroperitoneum, Hydraeroperitonia (hi- drah-er-o-per-it-o-ne'-um, -o'-ne-ah) (hydra-; drjp, air; peritoneum). A collection of gas and fluid in the peritoneal cavity.
  • Hydragog, Hydragogue (hi'-drag-og) (hydra-; dycofdc-, leading). 1 . Expelling water. 2. A pur- gative that causes copious liquid discharges.
  • Hydragogin (hi-drag'-oj-in). A diuretic and cardiac tonic containing tincture of digitalis, tincture of strophanthus, scillipicrin, scilli- toxin, and oxysaponin. Dose 10-15 . min. (0.66-1.0 Cc).
  • Hydramnios, Hydramnion (hi-dram'-ne-os, -on) (hydra-; apviov, fetal membrane). An abnormal amount of amniotic fluid.
  • Hydrangea (hi-dran'-je-ah) (hydra-; dyyslov, vessel). A genus of saxifragaceous shrubs. The root of H. arborescens contains hydran- gin and is employed in lithiasis.
  • Hydrargism, Hydrargyria, Hydrargyriasis, Hydrargyrism (hi-drar'-gizm, hi-drar-ji'- re-ah, hi-drar-je-ri'-as-is, hi-drar'-je-rizm). Chronic mercurial poisoning. See Mercu- rialism.
  • Hydrargyrate (hi-drar'-je-rdt). Relating to mercury; containing mercury.
  • Hydrargyric (hi-drar'-je-rik). Relating to mercury; mercuric. Hydrargyrol (hi-drar'-je-rol). Mercury para- ph enylthionate. H.-septol. See Mercury Quinoseptolate.
  • Hydrargyrum (hi-drar'-je-rum). See Mercury.
  • Hydrate (hi' -drat) (udojp, water). 1. A com- pound which may be considered to be formed by the replacement of half the hydrogen of one or more molecules of water by an elec- tropositive element or radicle. 2. A salt containing water of crystallization.
  • Hydrated (hi'-dra-ted) (see Hydrate). Com- bined with water.
  • Hydration (hi-dra'-shun) (see Hydrate). The process of combining with water or of con verting into a hydrate.
  • Hydrazin (hi' - draz - in) (hydra-; azotum, nitrogen). 1. H 4 N 2 . Diamid; a colorless, stable gas, soluble in water, having a peculiar odor and a strong alkaline reaction. 2. One of a class of bodies derived from hydrazin by replacing one or more of its hydrogen atoms by a radicle.
  • Hydremia (hi-dre' -me-ah) (hydra-; alpta, blood). A watery condition of the blood. HYDRENCEPHALOCELE 492 HYDROCIRSOCELE Hydrencephalocele (hi - dren - sef - al- o - sel) (hydra-, kjuk^olog, brain; kt)Xt), hernia). Hernia of the brain, in which the tumor is in part composed of a watery fluid.
  • Hydrencephalus (hi - dren - sef - al-us). See Hydrocephalus.
  • Hydrepigastrium (hi - drep -e- gas' -tre - urn) (hydra-; epigastrium). A collection of fluid between the abdominal muscles and the peritoneum.
  • Hydriatics (hi-dre-at' -iks) . See Hydrothera- peutics.
  • Hydric (hi'-drik). Containing water.
  • Hydrid (hi'-drid). A chemic compound con- taining hydrogen united to an element or radicle.
  • Hydro colli din (hi - dro - kol' - id - in) (hydro-; KoXXa, glue), C S H 13 N. A highly poisonous ptomain obtained from putrefying mackerel, horse-flesh, and ox-flesh, and said to be identi- cal with one obtained from nicotin.
  • Hydroa (hi-dro'-ah) (hydro-; dov, egg). A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin characterized by erythema, papules, pustules, vesicles, bullas, or combinations of these, and by intense itching. Syn., Dermatitis herpetiformis; Pemphigus pruriginosus.
  • Hydroaeric (hi-dro-a-er'-ik) (hydro-; dyp, air). Applied in auscultation to the sound given by cavities filled with air and water.
  • Hydroappendix (hi-dro-ap-en' -diks) . The dila- tion of the vermiform appendix with water.
  • Hydroargentic (hi-dro-ar-jen' -tik) (hydro-; ar- gentum). Containing hydrogen and silver.
  • Hydrobilirubin (hi-dro-bil-e-ru' -bin) (hydro-; bilirubin), C 32 H4 N 4 O 7 . A brown-red pigment formed by treating a solution of bilirubin with sodium amalgam. It is probably identical with stercobilin, the coloring-matter of the feces, and urobilin, the pigment of the urine.
  • Hydrobromate (hi-dro-bro'-mat) (hydro-; ftpoj- /xoc, a stench). A salt of hydrobromic acid.
  • Hydrobromic (hi-dro-bro' -mik) (see Hydro- bromate). Composed of hydrogen and bro- min. H. Acid. See Acid, Hydrobromic. H. Ether. See Ethyl Bromid.
  • Hydrobromid (hi - dro - bro' - mid). Same as Hydrobromate.
  • Hydrocele (hi'-dro-sel) (hydro-; KrjXr), tumor). A collection of serous fluid about the testicle or spermatic cord. The term is also applied to serous tumors in other locations. H. colli. See Maunoir's Hydrocele. H. hernialis, a collection of fluid in a hernial sac due to obstruction of its neck.
  • Hydrocephalic (hi-dro-sef-al'-ik) (see Hydro- cephalus). Pertaining to or affected with hydrocephalus. H. Cry, the loud cry of a child, indicating pain in the head.
  • Hydrocephalocele (hi-dro-sef -al-o-sel) . See Hydrencep halocele .
  • Hydrochinone (hi-dro-kin'-on). See Hydroqui- none.
  • Hydrochlorate (hi-dro-klo'-rdt). Any salt of hydrochloric acid.
  • Hydrochlorid (hi-dro-klo'-rid). Same as Hy- drochlorate.
  • Hydrocirsocele (hi - dro - sir' -so- sel) (hydro-; tupabc, venous enlargement; ktjXt), tumor). HYDROCOLLIDIN 493 HYDROPERICARDIUM Hydrocele accompanied with varicose veins of the spermatic cord.
  • Hydrocyanic (hi-dro-se-an'-ik). See Cyanogen, and Acid, Hydrocyanic.
  • Hydrodiarrhea (hi - dro -di-ar - e'- ah) (hydro-; diarrhea). Serous diarrhea.
  • Hydrodiascope (h i - dro - di' -as- kop) (hydro-; oca, through; okozsIu, to view). A device, shaped like a pair of spectacles, consisting of two chambers filled with physiologic salt solution, worn to correct keratoconus and astigmatism.
  • Hydroelectric (hi - dro - e - lek' -trik) (hydro-; electric). Pertaining to electricity developed in connection with water. H. Bath, a bath in which the metallic lining of the tub is connected with one pole of a battery, the other pole being in contact with the person of the patient.
  • Hydrofluoric Acid (hi-dro-flu-or'-ik). See Acid, Hydrofluoric, and Fluor in.
  • Hydrogastria (hi-dro-gas' -tre-ah). A gastric disorder from fluid due to constriction of the esophageal and pyloric orifices.
  • Hydrolein (hi-dro'-le-in) (hydro-; oleum, oil). A proprietary emulsion of cod-liver oil with pancreatin and borax.
  • Hydrology (hi-drol'-o-je) (hydro-; Xoyoc, science). A treatise on the nature and uses of water.
  • Hydrolysis (hi - drol' - is - is) (hydro-; Xuscv, to loose). The decomposition of water.
  • Hydrolytic (hi-dro-lif -ik) (see Hydrolysis). Pertaining to the decomposition of water or the liberation of water during a chemic reaction. H. Ferments, those causing a combination with the elements of water in the substances they decompose.
  • Hydromeningocele (hi - dro men - in'- go - sel) (hydro-; pnp>tj£, a membrane; tcqXi), a tumor), i. A cystic tumor of the meninges protrud- ing through the skull. 2. A form of spina bifida in which the sac contains cerebrospinal fluid.
  • Hydromeninx (Jii-dro-men' -inks) (hydro-; fxfjvcy^, a membrane). Dropsy of the mem- branes of the brain.
  • Hydrometer (hi-drom'-et-er) (hydro-; uhpo^, a measure). An instrument for determining the specific gravity of liquids.
  • Hydrometra (hi-dro-me'-trah) (hydro-; p-i^pa, the womb). A collection of watery fluid in the uterus.
  • Hydromphalus (h i - drom' - jal - us) (hydro-; d;d$aA6c, navel). A tumor at the navel, dis- tended with water.
  • Hydromyelia, Hydromyelus (hi -dro -mi -e' - le-ah, hi-dro-mi' -el-us) (Jiydro-; pueXoc, mar- row). Dilation of the central canal of the spinal cord with an accumulation of fluid.
  • Hydromyelocele (hi-dro-mi' -cl-o-scl) (hydro-; t-VjzXoc, marrow; kocX'co., cavity). 1. Exces- sive accumulation of fluid in the central canal of the spinal cord. 2. A variety of spina bifida in which remains of the spinal cord cover the tumor.
  • Hydronephros (hi-dro-nej'-ros) (hydro-; vep6c, kidney). A dropsical kidney. Syn., Hydro- nephrectasia.
  • Hydronephrosis (hi-dro-nef-ro'-sis) (see Hy- dronephros). A collection of urine in the pelvis of the kidney from obstructed outflow. The pressure of the fluid causes in time atrophy of the kidney-structure, and the whole organ is converted into a large cyst.
  • Hydronephrotic (hi-dro-nej-rot'-ik) (hydroneph- rosis). Relating to, affected with, or of the nature of, hydronephrosis.
  • Hydrooligocythemia (hi - dro - ol - ig-o-si-the'- me-ah) (Jiydro-; oX'cyoc, few; k'j~oc, cell; alua, blood). A form of secondary anemia in which there is an increase in the proportion of the serum to the corpuscles of the blood.
  • Hydroparasalpinx (h i-dro-par-ah-sal' -pinks) (hydro-; ~apa, beside; oaXzcy^, tube). An accumulation of water in the accessory tubes of the oviduct.
  • Hydropathy (hi-drop'-ath-e^ (hydro-; r.adoc, disease). The treatment of diseases by the use of water, externally and internally.
  • Hydropericardium (hi-dro- per -ik-ar' -de-um) HYDROPERIONE 494 HYDROSYRINGOMYELIA (hydro-; pericardium). A collection of serum within the pericardial cavity.
  • Hydroperione (hi - dro - per' - e - on) (hydro-; nep'c, around ; coov, egg). A seroalbuminous liquid existing between the decidua vera and the decidua reflexa and believed to nourish the embryo at an early period.
  • Hydroperitoneum (hi - dro - per - it-on-e'-um) (hydro-; peritoneum). Ascites.
  • Hydroperitonitis (hi - dro - per - it -on- i' - tis) . Peritonitis attended with watery effusion.
  • Hydrophlogosis (hi-dro-flo-go'-sis) (hydro-; (frMfojotc, a burning). Inflammation attended with serous effusion.
  • Hydrophobic (hi-dro-fo'-bik). Pertaining to, or of the nature of, hydrophobia. H. Teta- nus. See Tetanus, Hydrophobic.
  • Hydrophobophobia (hi - dro -fo- bo-fo'-be - ah) (hydrophobia; (f)6ftoc, fear). An intense dread of hydrophobia; a condition producing a state simulating true hydrophobia.
  • Hydrophore (hi'-dro-for) (hydro-; (j)kpecv, to bear). An apparatus consisting of a short grooved catheter used as an irrigating dilator of the urethra.
  • Hydropic (hi-drop'-ik) (hydrops). Pertaining to dropsy; dropsical.
  • Hydropneumatic (hi-dro-nu-mat' -ik) (hydro-; Tiveojia, air). Relating to water and air.
  • Hydropneumatosis (hi - dro -nu- mat - o'- sis) (hydro-; 7tv£up.aTcoacc, inflation). A collec- tion of fluid and air or other gas within the tissues.
  • Hydropneumo thorax (hi-dro-nu-mo-tho'-raks) (hydro-; Ttvedfia, air; dcopatj, thorax). The presence of serous fluid and air or gas in the pleural cavity.
  • Hydropneumopericardium (hi-dr o-nu-mo-per- ik-ar' -de-um) (hydro-; TzveOfia, air; pericar- dium). A collection of serum and air or other gas within the pericardium.
  • Hydropyonephrosis (hi -dro-pi-o- ne-ro r -sis) (hydro-; nuov, pus; v£c sharp). A metallic or basic radicle combined with one or more hydro xyl groups. Hy- droxids may be regarded as formed from water (HOH) by the substitution for one of its hydrogen atoms of a metal or basic radicle. Synonym of Hydrate.
  • Hydroxy! (hi-droks'-il) (see Hydroxid). The univalent radicle, OH, the combination of which with basic elements or radicles forms the hydroxids.
  • Hydroxylamin (hi-droks-iV -am-in) (hydroxid; amin), NH 2 OH. A basic substance, known only in solution in water or in combination with acids. Its hydrochlorid has been used as a substitute for chrysarobin in skin diseases.
  • Hydrozone (hi'-dro-zon) (hydro-; ozone). An aqueous solution of chemically pure hydrogen dioxid; it is used as a bactericide and heal- ing agent.
  • Hydruret (hi' -dru-ret) . See Hydrid.
  • Hydruria (hi-dru'-re-ah) (hydro-; odpov, urine). The discharge of a large quantity of urine of low specific gravity.
  • Hygiene (hi'-je-cn) (bycecvoc, good for the health). The science that treats of the laws of health and the methods of their observance. Hygienic (hi-je-en'-ik) (see Hygiene). Per- taining to hygiene, as hygienic treatment, that which simply guards against infraction of the laws of health.
  • Hygrin (hi'-grin) (bypoc, moist, from its liquid form), C 12 H 13 N. A liquid alkaloid derived from coca.
  • Hygro- (hi-gro-) (bypoc, moist). A prefix denot- ing moist or relating to moisture.
  • Hygroma (hi-gro' -mah) (hygro-; bpa, tumor). A bursa, or newly formed sac, distended with fluid.
  • Hygrometer (hi-grom'-et-er) (hygro-; fierpov, a measure). An instrument for determining quantitatively the amount of moisture in the air.
  • Hygrometric (hi-gro-met'-rik) (see Hygrome- ter), i. Pertaining to hygrometry. 2. Read- ily absorbing water; hygroscopic.
  • Hygrometry (hi-grom' -et-re) (see Hygrometer). The measurement of the moisture of the air.
  • Hygroscopic (hi-gro-skop'-ik) (hygro-; oKone'cv, to see). Having the property of absorbing moisture from the air.
  • Hygrostomia (hi-gro-sto' -me-ah) (hygro-; ozopa, mouth). Chronic salivation.
  • Hyloma (hi-lo'-mah) (uX-q, matter; bpa, tumor). A tumor originating in one of the primal pulp- tissues; subdivided into epihyloma, hypohy- loma, and mesohyloma.
  • Hymen (hi' -men) (bp-fjv, membrane). The fold of mucous membrane th#t partially occludes the vaginal orifice.
  • Hymenal (hi'-me-nal). Pertaining to the hymen.
  • Hymenitis (hi-men-i'-tis) (hymen; cue, inflam- mation). Inflammation of the hymen or of any membranous structure.
  • Hymenology (hi-men-ol' -o-je) (hymen; Xoyoc, science). The science of the nature, struc- ture, functions, and diseases of membranes.
  • Hyoepiglottic (hi-o- ep -e - glot' - ik) (hyoid; epiglottis). Relating to the hyoid bone and the epiglottis.
  • Hyoglossal (hi-o-glos'-al) (hyoid; yXcoooa, tongue). Extending from the hyoid bone to the tongue.
  • Hyoglossus (hi-o-glos'-us). See under Muscle.
  • Hyoid (hi'-oid) (T, the Greek letter upsilon; eldoc, form). Having the form of the Greek letter upsilon. H. Bone, a bone situated between the root of the tongue and the larynx, supporting the tongue and giving attachment to its muscles.
  • Hyomental (hi-o-ment'-al). Relating to the hyoid bone and the chin.
  • Hypacidity (hip-as-id' -it-e) (hypo-; acidity). Subacidity; deficiency in acid constituents.
  • Hypacousis, Hypacusia, Hypacusis, Hypa- kusis (hip-ah-koo'-sis, hip-ah-koo'-ze-ah) (hypo-; duouocc, hearing). Impairment of hear- ing.
  • Hypalbuminosis (hip-al-bu-min-o' -sis) (hypo-; albumin). Diminution in the proportion of albumin in the blood.
  • Hypaphorin (hi-paj'-or-in). A crystalline alkaloid derived from the seeds of Erythrina lithosperma.
  • Hypasthenia (hip-as-the' '-ne-ah) (hypo-; dadheca, weakness). Loss of strength in a slight degree.
  • Hyper- (hi-per-) (uizkp, over). A Greek prefix signifying above, beyond, or excessive.
  • Hyperacanthosis (hi-per-ak-an-tho'-sis) (hyper-; anavda, thorn). Abnormal growth of the prickle-cell layer of the epidermis, as in warts and condylomas.
  • Hyperacidity (hi-per-as-id' -it-e) (hyper-; acid- ity). Excessive acidity.
  • Hyperacousis, Hyperacusia, Hyperacusis, Hyperakusis (hi-per-ah-koo' -sis, hi-per-ah- koo'-ze-ah) (hyper-; anoootg, hearing). Morbid acuteness of the sense of hearing; auditory hyperesthesia.
  • Hyperactivity (%i-per-ak-tiv'-it-e) (hyper-; activity). Excessive or abnormal activity.
  • Hyperaeration (hi-per-a-er-a' -shun) (hyper-; ar)p, air). The condition of being furnished with excess of ozone.
  • Hyperalbuminosis (hi - per -al-bu -min-o'-sis) (hyper-; albumin). An increase in the amount of albumin in the blood.
  • Hyperalimentation (hi-per-al-e-men-ta r -shun) . See Superalimentation.
  • Hyperalimentosis (hi -per-al-e- men - to'- sis) . A morbid condition due to superalimentation.
  • Hyperalkalescence (hi-per-al-kal-es'-ens). Ex- cessive alkalinity.
  • Hyperanakinesis (hi - per - an - ak - in - e'- sis) (hyper-; dvaKevqac^, a moving upward; excitement). Excessive activity of a part. H. ventriculi, exaggerated activity of the gastric functions.
  • Hyperaphic (hi-per-af'-ik) (hyper-; dcbrj, a touching). Having morbid sensitiveness to touch.
  • Hyperazoturia (hi-per-az-ot-u' -re-ah) (hyper-; a, priv.; Qcorj, life; oupov, urine). Excess of nitrogenous matter in the urine.
  • Hyperbulia (hi-per -bu' -le-ah) (hyper-; fiouXrj, will). Exaggerated wilfulness; abnormal de- velopment of will-power.
  • Hypercatharsis (hi-per-kath-ar'-sis) (hyper-; Kadapatg, cleansing). Excessive purging.
  • Hyperchlorhydria (hi - per - klor - hi' -dre-ah). Same as Chlorhydria.
  • Hypercholia (hi-per-ko' -le-ah) (hyper-; ^o/Itj, bile). An excessive secretion of bile.
  • Hyperchondroma (hi - per - kon - dro' - mah) (hyper-; chondroma). A cartilaginous tumor.
  • Hyperemia (hi-per ■-e'-me-ah). See Hyperemia.
  • Hyperesthesia (hi - per -es- the' -ze- ah) . See Hyperesthesia, Hyperalbuminemia (hi - per -al-bu- min - e f - me -ah). Pernicious anemia characterized by more than the normal percentage of albumin in the blood.
  • Hyperosmia (hi-per-oz' -me-ah) (hyper-; da fir), smell). An abnormally acute sense of smell.
  • Hyperostosis (hi - per - os - to' -sis) (hyper-; daxkov, bone). A bony outgrowth.
  • Hyperperistalsis (hi - per - per - is - taV - sis) . Peristaltic unrest; a condition characterized by persistent rapid contractions of the stomach in close succession appearing after meals. Syn., Tormina ventriculi nervosa.
  • Hyperphleboectasy (hi - per-fleb-o-ek r - ta - se) (hyper-; r)occ, touch). Abnormal increase of tactile sensibility.
  • Hyperpyrexia (hi-per-pi-reks'-e-ah) (hyper-; nupexoc, fever). Excessively high body tem- perature. By some the term is used only when the temperature is above 106 F.
  • Hyperresonance (hi-per-res'-o-nans) (hyper-; resonance). Increased resonance on per- cussion.
  • Hypersecretion (hi-per-se-kre'-shun) (hyper-; secretion). Excessive secretion.
  • Hypersteatosis (hi-per-ste-at-o' -sis) (hyper-; steatosis). Excessive secretion of fat. Syn., Aleipsis acuta.
  • Hypersynergia (hi-per-sin-ur 1 '-je - ah) (hyper-; auvepy'ca, a working together). Excessive coordination; excessive energy in the or- gans in spreading disease throughout the system.
  • Hypertension (hi-per-ten' -shun) . Excessive tension; supertension.
  • Hyperthermalgesia (hi-per-therm-al-je' -se-ah) (hyper-; dippy, heat; dXyqocg, pain). Abnor- mal sensitiveness to heat. Hyperthermia (hi-per-ther'-me-ah). Elevation of temperature above the normal.
  • Hyperthyrea (hi-per-thi'-re-ah). The condi- tion arising from excessive functional activity of the thyroid gland.
  • Hyperthyrosis (hi -per -thi-ro' -sis). The condition in which there is excess of thyroid substance in the body.
  • Hypertonia (hi-per-to' -ne-ah) (hyper-; tovoc, tone), i. Excess of muscular tonicity. 2. Increased intraocular tension.
  • Hypertonic (hi-per-ton' '-ik) . Exceeding in strength or tension. H. Salt Solution, one that exceeds the osmotic tension of the blood- serum.
  • Hypertoxicity (hi - per - toks - is f - it - e) . The quality of being excessively toxic.
  • Hypertrichiasis, Hypertrichosis (hi-per-trik-i'- as-is, hi-per-trik-o' '-sis) . Excessive growth of hair of a part or the whole of the body.
  • Hypertrophous (hi-per'-trof-us). Marked by or exhibiting hypertrophy.
  • Hyperviscosity (hi-per-vis-kos'-it-e). Exagger- ation of adhesive properties; observed in the erythrocytes in inflammatory diseases, in anemias, or when they are subjected to the action of poisons, notably snake-poison.
  • Hypesthesia (hip-es-the' -ze-ah) (uno, under; dla- drjacg, sensation). Impairment of sensation; lessened tactile sensibility.
  • Hypesthetic (hip-es-thet'-ik). Pertaining to or affected with hypesthesia.
  • Hypha (hi'-fah) (ucfrr), a weaving; web; pi., hyphce). The filament or thread of a fungus; the matted hyphse form the mycelium.
  • Hyphemia (hi-fe'-me-ah) (bno, under; alfta, blood). 1. Oligemia; deficiency of blood. 2. Hemorrhage in the anterior chamber of the eye.
  • Hyphomycetes (hi-fo-mi-se'-tez) (ur), web; fiVK-qc, fungus). The molds.
  • Hypinosis (hip-in-o' -sis) (uizb, under; 7o, fiber). A deficiency of fibrin-factors in the blood. HYPISOTONIC 499 HYPOESOPHORIA Hypiso tonic (hip-is-o-ton' '-ik) . See Hypoiso- tonic.
  • Hypnacetin (hip-nas'-et-in), C . H 3 CO-NH- C 6 H 4 -OCH 3 - CO-C c H 5 . Acetophenonacetyl- paraamidophenol ether. It is hypnotic and antiseptic. Dose 3-4 gr. (0.2-0.25 Gm.), Syn., Hypnoacetin.
  • Hypnal (hip'-nal) (ukvoc, sleep). A drug com- posed of antipyrin and chloral hydrate and used as a hypnotic. Dose 15 gr. (1 Gm.). Unof. m Hypnalgia (hip-nal'-je-ah) (onvoc, sleep; dXyoc, pain). Pain recurring during sleep.
  • Hypnic (hip'-nik) (otcvckoc, producing sleep). 1. Pertaining to or inducing sleep. 2. An agent that induces sleep.
  • Hypno- (hip-no-) (unuoc, sleep). A prefix denot- ing relation to sleep or to hypnotism.
  • Hypnolepsy (hip'-no-lep-se) (hypno-; Xfjfac, seizure). Excessive sleepiness.
  • Hypnology (hip-nol'-o-je) (hypno-; Xoyoc, science). The science dealing with sleep or with hypnotism.
  • Hypnone (hip' -non). See Acetophenone.
  • Hypnopompic (hip-no-pomp' -ik) (hypno-; nopLTti), a procession). Applied to visions seen at the moment of awakening from sleep or prior to complete awakening, as when a dream figure persists in waking life.
  • Hypnosia (hip-no' -ze-ah) (otzvoc, sleep). A condition of morbid drowsiness.
  • Hypnosis (hip-no' -sis) (see Hypnosia). 1. The condition produced by hypnotizing. 2. The production of sleep; also, the gradual ap- proach of sleep.
  • Hypnotic (hip-not' -ik) (hypnosis). 1. Inducing sleep. 2. Pertaining to hypnotism. 3. A remedy that causes sleep.
  • Hypnotization (hip - not - iz - a' - shun) (hyp- notism). The induction of hypnotism.
  • Hypo thermal (hi-po-ther '-mat) (see Hypo- thermia). Slightly hot; tepid.
  • Hypo- (hi-po-) (uno, under). A prefix denoting: 1. Deficiency or lack. 2. Below or beneath, opposed to epi-, upon. 3. Of acids and salts, denoting those having a smaller number of atoms of oxygen than other compounds of the same elements.
  • Hypoacidity (hi^po-as-id'-it-e) . See Hypacidity.
  • Hypoazoturia (hi-po-az-ot-u' -re-ah) (hypo-; azoturia). A diminished amount of urea in the urine.
  • Hypobromite (hi-po-bro' -mit) (hypo-; Pp juice). Deficiency of secretion; deficiency of chyle.
  • Hypocytosis (hi-po-si-to'-sis) (hypo-; kutoc, cell). Diminution of the number of blood- corpuscles.
  • Hypodermatic, Hypodermic (hi-po-der-mat'-ik, hi-po-der'-mik) (hypo-; dip/ia, skin). Placed or introduced beneath the skin, as hypoder- matic injection.
  • Hypodermatoclysis, Hypodermoclysis (hi-po- der-mat-ok'-lis-is, hi-po-der-mok.' -lis-is) (hypo- dermatic; kXoocc, injection). The introduction into the subcutaneous tissues of large quanti- ties of fluids, especially of normal saline solu- tion.
  • Hypodermotherapy (hi-po-der-mo-ther'-ap-e) (hypo-; dipp.a, skin; depaneca, therapy). Sub- cutaneous medication.
  • Hypoesophoria (hi-po-es-o-fo'-re-ah)- (hypo-; esophoria). A tendency of the visual axis of one eye to deviate downward and inward. HYPOEXOPHORIA 500 HYPOTHENAR Hypoexophoria (hi-po-eks-o-fo' -re-ah) (hypo-; exophorid\. A tendency of the visual axis of one eye to deviate downward and outward.
  • Hypogastric (hi-po-gas'-trik) (hypogastrium). Pertaining to the hypogastrium.
  • Hypogastrium (hi -po- gas' - tre - urn) (hypo-; yaozTjp, the belly). The lower median anterior region of the abdomen.
  • Hypogastropagus (hi-po-gas-trop'-ag-us) (hy- pogastrium; izayoc, anything solid). A genus of twin monsters characterized by having the union in the region of the hypo- gastrium.
  • Hypogeusia (hi - po - gu f - se - ah) (hypo-; yeuocc, taste). Diminution in the sense of taste.
  • Hypoglossal (hi-po-glos'-al) (see Hypoglossus). Situated under the tongue. H. Nerve. See under Nerve.
  • Hypoglossus (hi-po-glos'-us) (hypo-; yXcbooa, tongue). The hypoglossal nerve.
  • Hypoglottis (hi-po-glot'-is) (see Hypoglossus). i. The under part of the tongue. 2. A swell- ing at the under part of the tongue, as a ranula.
  • Hypognathous (hi-pog' -na-thus) (see Hypog- nathus). Having the lower mandible longer than the upper.
  • Hypognathus (hi-pog' -na-thus) (hypo-; jvadoc, jaw). A double monstrosity in which the parasite is attached to the inferior maxillary bone.
  • Hypohidrosis (hi - po - hid - ro' - sis) (hypo-; Idpcootc, sweating). Scanty perspiration.
  • Hypoisotonic (hi - po-is-o ■- ton' - ik) (hypo-; isotonic). Applied to a solution the osmotic pressure of which is lower than blood-plasma or some other solution taken as a standard.
  • Hypokinesia, Hypokinesis (hi-po-kin-e'-ze-ah, hi-po-kin-e' -sis) (hypo-; ncvqocc, motion). Deficiency in motor reaction under stimula- tion.
  • Hypoleukocytosis (hi-po-lu-ko-si-to' -sis) (hy- po-; leukocyte). A diminution of the number of leukocytes in the blood.
  • Hypolympha (hi-po-lim' '-fah) (hypo-; lympha, water). An extravasation of plastic lymph into the anterior chamber of the eye.
  • Hypomania (hi-po-ma'-ne-ah) (hypo-; p.av'ca, madness). A moderate degree of maniacal exaltation.
  • Hypomastia, Hypomazira (hi-po-mas'-te-ah, hi- po-ma' -ze-ah) (hypo-; p.ao~6c, the breast). Abnormal smallness of the mammary gland.
  • Hypomelancholia (hi-po-mel-an-ho' -le-ah) (hy- po-; melancholia). Moderate melancholia; melancholia without delusions.
  • Hypometropia (hi - po - me - tro' - pe - ah) (hy- po-; fxkrpov, a measure; axp, vision). Myopia.
  • Hypopepsia (hi-po-pep'-se-ah) (hypo-; Tis^ic, digestion). Subnormal digestive power.
  • Hypophoria (hi-po- fo' -re-ah) (hypo-; T)occ, touch). Diminution of sensitive- ness to tactile impressions.
  • Hypopyon (hi-po' -pe-on) (hypo-; nuov, pus). A collection of pus in the anterior chamber of the eye.
  • Hyposcheotomy (hi-po-ske-ot'-o-me) (hypo-; oo~ieov, scrotum; xkp.veiv, to cut). The surgical puncturing of a hydrocele at the lower part of the tunica vaginalis.
  • Hyposmia (hi-poz' -me-ah) (hypo-; oojultj, smell). Diminution of the sense of smell.
  • Hypospadia, Hypospadias (hi-po-spa'-de-ah, hi-po-spa' -de-as) (hypo-; oTiav, to draw). A condition in which the urethra opens upon the under surface of the penis.
  • Hypostasis (hi-pos'-tas-is) (hypo-; stasis). 1. A settling; also, the sediment. 2. The settling of blood in the dependent parts of the body.
  • Hypostatic (hi-po-stat'-ik) (see Hypostasis). Due to, or of the nature of, hypostasis. H. Congestion. See Hypostasis (2). H. Pneu- monia. See Pneumonia, Hypostatic.
  • Hyposthenia (hi-po-sthe-ne'-ah) (hypo-; odevog, strength). Weakness.
  • Hyposthenuria (hi-po-sthen-u' -re-ah) (hypo- sthenia; oupov, urine). 1. Suppression of the urine from inability of the kidney to eliminate. 2. Diminution of solids in the urine.
  • Hypothalamus (hi-po -thai' -am -us) (hypo-; 6a.XaiJ.oc, thalamus). A group of prominences and aggregations of ganglions lying on the ventral side beneath the thalamus. Syn., Subthalamus.
  • Hypothenar (hi-poth' -en-ar) (hypo-; dkvap, palm). The fleshy eminence on the palm HYPOTHERMAL 501 HYSTEROLAPAROTOMY of the hand over the metacarpal bone of the little finger. Also, the prominences on the palm at the base of the fingers.
  • Hypothermia (hi-po iher'-me-ati) (hypo-; dippy, heat). Subnormal temperature.
  • Hypothyroidism (hi-po-thi' -roid-izm) . A mor- bid condition attributed to deficient activity of the thyroid gland.
  • Hypothyrosis (hi-po-thi-ro'-sis). Reduced functional activity of the thyroid gland.
  • Hypotonia, Hypotonus (hi-po-to'-ne-ah, hi-pot'- o-nus) (hypo-; tovoc, tension). Decrease of normal tonicity or tension; especially diminution of intraocular pressure.
  • Hypotonic (hi-po-ton'-ik). Below the normal strength or tension. # Hypovenosity (hi- po-ven-os' -it-e) (hypo-; venosus, venous). A condition in which there is incomplete development of the venous system in a given area, resulting in atrophy and degeneration in the muscles.
  • Hyssop (his'-op) (uoocotioc, an aromatic plant). The leaves and tops of Hyssopus officinalis, an aromatic stimulant, carminative, and tonic, employed in chronic catarrh of the respiratory tract. Dose of the fluidextract 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc).
  • Hyster-, Hystero-, (his-ter-, his-ter-o-) (oaxkpa, uterus). Prefixes signifying relation to the uterus or to hysteria.
  • Hysteralgia (his - ter - aV - je - ah) (hyster-; aXyoc, pain). Neuralgic pain in the uterus.
  • Hysterectomy (his - ter - ek'- to - me) (hyster-; ixroprj, a cutting out). Excision of the uterus through the abdomen (abdominal hysterectomy) or the vagina (vaginal hys- terectomy).
  • Hysteredema, Hysteroedema (his -ter-e- de'- mah) (hyster-; o'idrjpa, edema). Edema of the womb-substance.
  • Hysteric (his-ter' -ik) . Pertaining to hysteria.
  • Hysterics (his-ter' '-iks) . A popular term for the hysteric attack.
  • Hysteritis (his-ter -V -tis) . See Metritis.
  • Hysterobubonocele (his - ter ~o- bu - bon'- o - set) (hystero-; flouflujvofcfjXr), an inguinal hernia). An inguinal hysterocele.
  • Hysterocele (his'-ter-o-sel) (hystero-; ktjXt), her- nia). A hernia containing all or part of the uterus.
  • Hysterocleisis (his - ter - o - Hi' - sis) (hystero-; kXsIocc, closure). The closure of the uterus by suturing the edges of the os.
  • Hysterocystic (his -ter - - sist' - ik) (hystero-; kuotcc, the bladder). Relating to the uterus and bladder.
  • Hysterocystocleisis (his -ter - - sist-o-kli' -sis) (hystero-; kuotcc, bladder; kXs'cocc, clos- ure). Bozeman's operation for relief of vesicouterovaginal fistula or for uterouterine fistula, consisting in turning the cervix uteri into the bladder and suturing it.
  • Hysterocystopexy (his -ter-o - sist' -o- peks-e). See Ventrovesicofixation.
  • Hysterodynamometer (his-ter -o-din-am-om'- et-er) (hystero-; duvapcc, power; pkxpov, a. measure). An apparatus to record the num- ber, intensity, and variations of uterine con- tractions.
  • Hysteroepilepsy (his-ter-o-ep' -e-lep-se) (hystero-; epilepsy). A form of hysteria accompanied by convulsions resembling those of epilepsy.
  • Hysterogenic, Hysterogenous (his -ter-o - jen'-ik, his-ter-o j'-en-us) (hystero-; fevvdv, to be- get). Causing or producing a hysteric attack, as hysterogenic zones, certain regions pressure upon which excites a hysteric paroxysm.
  • Hysteroid (his' -ter-oid) (hystero-; eldoc, like). 1. Resembling hysteria. 2. Pertaining to hysteroepilepsy.
  • Iatrotechnics (i-at-ro-tek' -niks) (caxpoc, physi- cian; xi%vr), art). The art of healing.
  • Iceland Moss (is' -land). See Cetraria (2). I. Spar, a crystalline form of calcium carbonate, having doubly refracting properties, and used in instruments for studying polarized light.
  • Ichor (i'-kor) (c/ojp, serum or pus). An acrid, thin, puriform discharge.
  • Ichorization (i-kor-iz-a'-shun) (ichor). The conversion of tissue into ichor.
  • Ichorous (i'-kor-us) (ichor). Resembling or relating to ichor.
  • Ichorrhemia (i-kor-e'-me-ah) (ichor; aljia, blood). The presence of septic matter in the blood.
  • Ichthalbin (ik-thaV '-bin\ Ichthyol albuminate; used in gastrointestinal diseases. Dose 15-30 gr. (1-2 Gm.) 3 times daily.
  • Ichthargan (ik-thar'-gan). A combination of silver and ichthyol-sulfonic acid containing 30 % of the former. It is used in acute gonor- rhea in injections containing i-igr in 8 oz.; irrigation with solutions of 1 : 4000-1 : 750.
  • Ichthoform (ik'-tho-form). Ichthyol formalde- hyd; it is used as an intestinal disinfectant, antiphlogistic, and as a vulnerary. Dose 15- 20 gr. ( 1. 0-1.3 Gm.) daily.
  • Ichthosin (ik'-tho-sin). A compound of ich- thyol and eosin used in skin diseases.
  • Ichthyism (ik'-the-izm). See Ichthysmus.
  • Ichthyo- (ik-the-o-) (cxduc, fish). A prefix mean- ing fish.
  • Ichthyoid (ik' -the-oid) (ichthyo-; eldoc, like). Fish-like.
  • Ichthyophagous (ik-the-oj'-ag-us) (ichthyo-; fiafslv, to eat). Fish-eating.
  • Ichthyotoxicon (ik-the-o'-toks' -ik-on) (ichthyo-; rosoiov, poison). 1. The toxin present in the serum of certain fishes, as in that of the eel. 2. A general term for the active agent in poisoning by eating fish.
  • Ichthyotoxin (ik-the-o-toks' -in) . A basic poison generated in fish by growth of bacteria or fungi.
  • Ichthysmus (ik-thiz' -mus) (r/duc, fish). Poison- ing due to the absorption of mytilotoxin from fish.
  • Ichtol (ik'-tol). A proprietary mixture said to consist of lanolin, iodoform, glycerol, phe- nol, oil of lavender, and oil of eucalyptus, used in skin diseases.
  • Icterencephalotyphus (ik-ter-en-sef-al-o-ti' -fits) (icterus; efuk^aXoc, the brain; xucfroc, typhus). Typhoid fever with marked cerebral symptoms combined with jaundice.
  • Icterepatitis (ik-ter-ep-a-ti' -tis) (icterus; fjxap, liver; ixcc, inflammation) Inflammation of the liver with jaundice.
  • Icteric (ik-ter'-ik) (icterus). Pertaining to or characterized by jaundice.
  • Icteritious (ik-ter-ish' -us) (icterus). 1. Af- fected with or resembling icterus. 2. Yellow, as the skin in jaundice.
  • Icterohematuria (ik-ter-o-hem-at-u'-re-ah) (ic- terus; hematuria). Jaundice with hematuria.
  • Icterohemoglobinuria (ik-ter-o-hem-o-glo-bin- u'-re-ah). Combined icterus and hemoglo- binuria.
  • Icteroid (ik f -ter-oid) (icterus; eldoc, form). Resembling the color of, or having the nature of, jaundice.
  • Ictus (ik'-tus) (L., "a stroke"). A sudden at- tack. I. epilepticus, an epileptic fit. I., Laryngeal, an apoplectiform attack occur- ring during a severe paroxysm of coughing and passing off in a few seconds. I. para- lyticus, a paralytic stroke. I. solis, sun- stroke.
  • Ideoglandular (i-de-o-glan'-du-lar). Relating to glandular activity as evoked by a mental concept.
  • Ideometabolic (i-de-o-met-ab-ol'-ik). Relating to metabolic action induced by some idea.
  • Ideomotor (i-de-o-mo' -tor) (idea; movere, to move). Pertaining conjointly to ideation and movement. I. Center, that part of the cortex which, influenced by ideation, excites muscular movement. I. Movements, un- conscious movements due to impulses of the mind when the attention is otherwise ab- sorbed.
  • Ideomuscular (i-de-o-mus' -ku-lar). Relating to influence exerted upon the muscular sys- tem by a mental concept.
  • Ideophrenia (i-de-o-fre'-ne-ah) (idea; cpprjv, mind). Insanity with marked perversion of ideas.
  • Ideovascular (i-de-o-vas' '-ku-lar) . Relating to a vascular change resulting from a dominant idea.
  • Idio- (id-e-o-) ('cdtoc, one's own). A prefix signifying pertaining to one's self, peculiar to the individual.
  • Idiocrasia, Idiocrasis (id-e-o-kra' -ze-ah, -kra'- sis) (idio-; upaocc, temperament). Idiosyn- crasy.
  • Idiocratic (id-e-o-krat'-ik). Relating to an idiosyncrasy.
  • Idiocy (id'-e-o-se) (cdcoorqc, a private person). A congenital condition of mental deficiency, usually accompanied by physical defects, and characterized by an almost total absence of intelligence.
  • Idiogenesis (id-e-o- jen'-e-sis) (idio-; ytvvav, to produce). The origin of idiopathic diseases.
  • Idiohypnotism (id - e-o - hip'- no - tizm) . Self- induced hypnotism.
  • Idioisoagglutinin (id-e-o- is- o-ag-lu' -tin-in) (idio-; 'iooc, equal; agglutinin). An inborn nonhereditary substance present in normal blood, due to interchangeable immunization between mother and fetus.
  • Idioisolysin (id-e-o-is-oV -is-in) (idio-; isolysin). An inborn, nonhereditary isolysin due to an interchangeable immunization between mother and fetus.
  • Idioneurosis (id-e-o-nu-ro' -sis) (idio-; neurosis). An affection due to some disturbed or ab- normal condition of the nerves supplying the affected part; a simple and uncomplicated neurosis.
  • Idiopathic (id-e-o-path' -ik) (idio-; nadog, dis- ease). Not dependent upon another disease or upon a known or recognized cause.
  • Idiophrenic (id-e-o-fren'-ik) (idio-; (fipyv, mind). Due to disease of the brain; applied to cer- tain forms of insanity.
  • Idioplasm (id'-e-o-plazm) (idio-; nXaopa, a thing formed). A reproductive substance not contained in the body of the cell, but in the chromosomes of the nucleus, controlling and determining the actual characters of the particular cell, and also those of all of its descendants.
  • Idiospasm (id'-e-o-spazm) (idio-; oizaop.bg, spasm). A spasm confined to one part.
  • Idiosyncrasy (id-e-o-sin' -kra-se) (idio-; ouv, together; Kpdocc, a mingling), i. Any special or peculiar characteristic or temperament by which a person differs from other persons. 2. A peculiarity of constitution that makes an individual react differently from most persons to drugs or other influences.
  • Idiot (id'-e-ot) (cdcdjxrjc, a private person). A person congenitally almost destitute of intel- ligence.
  • Idiotopy (id-e-ot'-op-e) (idio-; xbitog, place). Topographic description pertaining to the relation of different parts of the same organ.
  • Idrosis (id-ro'-sis). See Hidrosis.
  • Igazol (ig'-az-ol). A proprietary gaseous anti- septic said to contain iodoform and form- aldehyd. It is used in tuberculosis.
  • Igniextirpation (ig-ne-eks-ter-pa' -shun) (ignis; extirpate, to root out). Hysterectomy by cauterization.
  • Ignipedites (ig-ne-ped-i' '-tez) (ignis; pes, foot). Hot-foot; a disorder marked by an intense burning sensation in the soles of the feet.
  • Ignipuncture (ig'-ne-punk-tur) (ignis; punc- tura, puncture). Puncture with platinum needles heated to whiteness by the electric current.
  • Ignis (ig'-nis) (L.). Fire. I. sacer, erysipelas. I. sancti antonii, Saint Anthony's fire, an old name for erysipelas and for anthrax.
  • Ikota (ik-o'-tah). A religious mania occurring among women in Siberia.
  • Ileac (il'-e-ak) (ileum). Pertaining to the ileum. I. Passion, a disorder marked by severe griping pain, fecal vomiting, with spasm of the abdominal muscles. Syn., Ileus.
  • Ileectomy (il-e-ek' -to-me) (ileum; iiczofir), a cutting out). ■ Excision of the ileum.
  • Ileitis (il-e-i'-tis) (ileum; czcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the ileum.
  • Ileo- (il-e-o-). A prefix signifying relation to the ileum.
  • Ileocecal (il-e-o-se' -kal) (ileo-; cecum). Per- taining to both ileum and cecum. I. Fossa, a depression in the lower, part of the small intestine at the base of the vermiform process. I. Valve, a valve, consisting of two folds of mucosa, that guards the passage between the ileum and cecum.
  • Ileocecum (il-e-o-se' -kum) . The ileum and cecum regarded as one.
  • Ileocolic (il-e-o -kol' -ik) (ileo-; colon). Per- taining conjointly to the ileum and the colon.
  • Ileocolitis (il-e-o-ko-li'-tis) (ileo-; colon; czcc, inflammation). Inflammation of the ileum and the colon.
  • Ileocolonic (il-e-o-kol-on'-ik). See Ileocolic.
  • Ileocolostomy (il-e-o-ko-los' -to-me) (ileo-; colon; azdfia, mouth). The establishment of an artificial communication between the ileum and the colon.
  • Ileocolotomy (il-e-o-ko-lot' -o-me) (ileo-; colon; zkfivecv, to cut). A surgical operation on the ileum and colon.
  • Ileoileostomy (il-e-o - il-e-os'-to - me) (ileo-; ozdfxa, mouth). The operation of establishing an artificial communication between two dif- ferent parts of the ileum.
  • Ileoparietal (il-e-o- par-i' '-et-al) . Relating to the walls of the ileum.
  • Ileoproctostomy (il-e-o-prok-tos' -to-me) (ileo-; ■k piDKzbc, rectum; ozb\m, mouth). The surgical formation of a fistula between the ileum and rectum.
  • Ileorectostomy (il-e-o-rek-tos f -to-me) . See Ileo- proctostomy.
  • Ileosigmoidostomy (il-e-o-sig-moid-os' -to-me) . The surgical formation of a fistula between the ileum and sigmoid flexure.
  • Ileostomy (il-e-o s' '-to-me) (ileo-; azdfia, mouth). The surgical formation of a passage through the abdominal wall into the ileum, or from the ileum to some other hollow organ.
  • Ileotomy (il-e-ot' -o-me) (ileo-; zifivecv, to cut). Incision of the ileum through the abdominal wall.
  • Ileum (il'-e-um) (e'cXecv, to roll). The lower portion of the small intestine, terminating in the cecum.
  • Ileus (il'-e-us) (cXcbc, a severe kind of colic). Ileac passion; volvulus.
  • Iliadelphus (il-e-ad-el' -us) (ilia; doeXcf)6c, brother). A monstrosity double from the pelvis upward.
  • Ilio- (il-e-o-). A prefix denoting relation to the ilium.
  • Iliocolotomy (il-e-o-ko-lot' -o-me) (ilio-; colon; zojj.rj, a cutting). Incision of the colon in the iliac region.
  • Iliodorsal (il-e-o-dor' -sal) (ilio-; dorsum, the back). Relating to the dorsal surface of the ilium.
  • Iliofemoral (il-e-o-em f -or-al) (ilio-; femur). Pertaining conjointly to the ilium and the femur. I. Ligament. See Ligament, Ileo- jemoral.
  • Iliohypogastric (il-e-o - hi - po - gas' - trik) (ilio-; hypogastric). Pertaining conjointly to the ilium and the hypogastrium.
  • Ilioinguinal (il-e-o-in' -gwi-nal) (ilio-; inguen, groin). 1. Pertaining to the ilium and the groin. 2. Lying partly within the iliac and partly within the inguinal region.
  • Iliolumbocostoabdominal (il-e-o-lum-bo-kos- to-db-dom' -in-al) . Pertaining to the iliac, lumbar, costal, and abdominal regions.
  • Iliopectineal (il-e-o-pek-tin' -e-al) (ilio-; pecten, comb). Pertaining conjointly to the ilium and the pubes. I. Line. See Line, Iliopectineal.
  • Iliopsoas (il-e-o-so'-as) (ilio-; /j.a, a mutilation). 1. The portion of iris removed in iridectomy. 2. See Coloboma.
  • Impaired functional activity of the thyroid gland. Dysthyroid, Dysthyroidism (dis-thi'-roid, -izm). Incomplete development and function of the thyroid gland.
  • In common salt (NaCl) and many rocks. In celestite and stronti- anite.
  • In quartz (SiOo). (Most abundant element after oxygen.) Native and in many ores.
  • Iridocyclectomy (i-rid-o-si-klek' -to-me) (irido-; kukXoc, circle; enro/ir), excision). Excision of the iris and of the ciliary body.
  • Iridocyclitis (i-rid-o -sik-W -tis) (irido-; kukXoc, a circle; czeg, inflammation). Inflammation of the iris and the ciliary body.
  • Iridocystectomy (i-rid-o-sist-ek' -to-me) (irido-; k'jotic, bladder; i/cro/xTj, excision). Knapp's operation for making a new pupil when iridocyclitis or iridocapsulitis following cata- ract operations or trauma has closed'the old.
  • Iridodesis (i-rid-od' -es-is) (irido-; deacg, a bind- ing together). An operation for the purpose of altering the position of the pupil by draw- ing the iris into one or two small openings in the cornea and preventing its return by a loop of silk placed around it.
  • Iridodialysis (i-rid-o-di-aV -is-is) . 1. See Core- dialysis. 2. The separation of the iris from its attachments.
  • Iridodonesis (i-rid-o-do-ne' -sis) (irido-; d6vt0'.c, a trembling). Tremulousness of the iris; hippus.
  • Iridol (i'-rid-ol) (Iris, a genus of plants), C 7 H 5 - (OCH 3 ) 2 OH. A phenol obtained from dis- tillation of iridic acid (C 10 H l2 O 6 ) from orris- root.
  • Iridoleptynsis (i-rid-o-lep-tin' -sis) (irido-; Utt- tuvocc, attenuation). Attenuation or atrophy of the iris.
  • Iridoparelkysis (i-rid-o -par -el' -kis -is) (irido-; TtapeXnecv, to draw aside). An induced pro- lapse of the iris to effect displacement of the pupil.
  • Iridoplatinum (i-rid-o-plat' -in-um) . An alloy of iridium and platinum; used in making electrodes, etc.
  • Iridoplegia (i-rid-o-ple' -je-ah) (irido-; 7i\r)yq, stroke). Paralysis of the sphincter of the iris.
  • Iridorhexis (i-rid-o-reks'-is) (irido-; pfj&c, a breaking). Rupture of the iris.
  • Iridosclerotomy (i-rid-o-skler-of '-o-me) (irido-; onkripbc, hard; xeptvecv, to cut). Puncture of the sclera with division of the iris.
  • Iridosis (i-rid-o' -sis) . See' Iridodesis.
  • Iridosteresis (i-rid-o-ster-e'-sis). See Aniridia and Irideremia.
  • Iridotomy (i-rid-ot' -o-me) (irido-; roptr), sec- tion). An incision into the iris.
  • Irisin (i'-ris-in). Same as Iridin.
  • Iritic (i-rit'-ilz) (iritis). Of the nature of, per- taining to, or affected with iritis.
  • Iritis (i-ri'-tis) (iris; exec, inflammation). In- flammation of the iris.
  • Iritoectomy (i-rit-o-ek' -to-me) (iris; hro/ir), a cutting out). The removal of a portion of the iris and iritic membrane for occlusion of the pupil.
  • Iritomy (i-rif '-o-me) . See Iridotomy.
  • Isapiol (is-ap' -e-ol) ('cooe, equal; apiol), C 12 H, 4 - 4 . An isomer of apiol obtained from it by action of alcoholic solution of potassium hydroxid with heat. In physiologic prop- erties it differs but slightly from apiol.
  • Isatin (i'-sat-in) (caaxcc, woad), C 8 H 5 N0 2 . A substance obtained by the oxidation of indigo with HNO s .
  • Ischemia (is-ke' -me-ah) Ylay^cv, to check; al/ia, blood). Local anemia.
  • Ischemic (is-kem'-ik) (see Ischemia). Affected with or relating to ischemia.
  • Ischeocele (is'-ke-o-sel). See Ischiocele.
  • Ischialgia (is-ke-al' -je-ah) (ischium; aljog, pain). Sciatica; neuralgia of the hip.
  • Ischias, Ischiasis (is'-ke-as, is-ki'-a-sis). See Ischialgia.
  • Ischiatic (is-ke-at'-ik) (ischium). Pertaining to the ischium.
  • Ischidrosis (is-kid-ro'-sis) faxi-cv, to suppress; cdpojc, sweat). 'Suppression of sweat.
  • Ischio- (is-ke-o-) (ischium). A prefix indi- cating relationship to the ischium or the hip.
  • Ischioanal (is-ke-o-a' '-nal) (ischio-; anus). Pertaining to the ischium and anus.
  • Ischiobulbar (is-ke-o-buV -bar) (ischio-; (H6X- ftoc, a bulb). Pertaining to the ischium and the bulb of the urethra.
  • Ischiocapsular (is-ke-o-kap'-su-lar) (ischio-; capsula, a capsule). Pertaining to the isch- ium and the capsular ligament of the hip.
  • Ischiocavernosus (is-ke-o-kav-er-no'-sus) (isch- io-; caverna, cavern). The erector penis (or erector clitoridis).
  • Ischiocele (is f -ke-o-sel) (ischio-; ktjXtj, hernia). Hernia through the sciatic notch.
  • Ischiofemoral (is-ke-o- fern' -o-ral) (ischio-; femur). 1. Pertaining to the ischium and the femur. 2. The adductor magnus muscle.
  • Ischioneuralgia (is-ke-o-nu-ral' '-je-ah) (isch- io-; neuralgia). Sciatica.
  • Ischiopagy (is-ke-op'-aj-e) (ischio-; nayoc, anything which has become solid). A double monstrosity in which the two bodies are united at the coccyx and sacrum.
  • Ischioperineal (is-ke-o-per-in-e'-al) (ischio-; perineum). 1. Pertaining to both ischium and perineum; pertaining to the space between the anus, and the scrotum. 2. See Transversus perincei under Muscle.
  • Ischioprostatic (is-ke-o-pros-tat r -ik). 1. Re- lating to the ischium and the prostate. 2. The transversus perinaei muscle.
  • Ischiopubic (is-ke-o-pu'-bik). Relating to the ischium and the pubes. ' ISCHIORECTAL 527 ISOMETRIC Ischiorectal (is-ke-o-rek'-tal) (ischio-; rectum). Pertaining to both ischium and rectum. I. Abscess, an inflammation of the areolar tissue of the ischiorectal fossa. I. Fossa. See Fossa, Ischiorectal.
  • Ischium (is'-ke-um) (co%cov, hip). The in- ferior part of the os innominatum; the bone upon which the body rests in sitting.
  • Ischochymia (is-ko-ki'-me-ah) (cayjcv, to sup- press; ^/iof, juice). Dilation of the stomach.
  • Ischogalactia (is-ko-gal-ak' -te-ah) (cayecv, to suppress; jbla, milk). Suppression of the natural flow of milk.
  • Ischomenia (is-ko-me' -ne-ah) Vcoxecv, to sup- press; p.T\v, month; menses). Suppression of the menstrual flow.
  • Ischuretic (is-ku-ref '-ik) (see Ischuria), i. Relating to or relieving ischuria. 2. A remedy or agent that relieves retention or suppression of urine.
  • Ischuria (is-ku' '-re-ah) ('cayecv, to suppress; oopov, urine). Retention or suppression of urine.
  • Isinglass (i'-zing-glas). See Ichthyocolla. I., Vegetable. See Agar.
  • Island (i'-land). See Insula and Blood-islands.- I.s, Langerhans', little cellular masses in the interstitial connective tissue of the pan- creas, subject to various interpretations. I. of Reil, a group of five or six small convo- lutions (gyri operti) situated at the bottom of the fissure of Sylvius.
  • Iso- (i-so-) ('iooc, equal). A prefix signifying equal, or, in chemic nomenclature, isomeric.
  • Iso-bodies (i-so-bod'-ez). See Isoagglutinin, Isocytolysin, Isohemolysin, etc.
  • Isoagglutinin (i-so-ag-lu' -tin-in) (iso-; agglu- tinin). An agglutinin in the blood of an individual capable of agglutinating the blood- corpuscles of another individual of the same species.
  • Isoamylamin (i-so-am-iV -am-in) (iso-; amy- lum, starch; amin). A ptomain obtained in the distillation of horn with potassium hy- droxid; it also occurs in the putrefaction of yeast.
  • Isochromatic (i-so-kro-mat'-ik) (iso-; yp(bp.a, color). Having the same color throughout.
  • Isochronous (i-Sok'-ro-nus) (iso-; xpovoc, time). Occurring at or occupying equal intervals of time.
  • Isocoria (i-so-ko' -re-ah) (iso-; rcop-r), pupil) Equality in diameter of the two pupils.
  • Isocreatinin (i-so-kre-at'-in-in), C 4 H 7 N 3 0. An isomer of creatinin isolated from decompos- ing flesh.
  • Isocytolysin (1-so-si-toV -is-in) (iso-; kutoc, cell; Xuecv, to loose). A cytolysin from the blood of an animal, capable of acting against the cells of other animals of the same species. Cf. Isohemolysin.
  • Isodiametric (i-so-di-am-et' '-rik) (iso-; dm, through; pihpov, a measure). Having equal diameters.
  • Isodynamic (i-so-di-nam' '-ik) (iso-; duvap.cc, force). Having or generating equal amounts of force. I. Foods, those that produce an equal amount of heat in undergoing the chemic changes of digestion.
  • Isoelectric (i-so-e-lek f -trik) (iso-; TjXeKvpov, amber). Having the same electric properties throughout.
  • Isohemoagglutinin (i-so-hem-o-ag-lu' -tin-in) . See Isoagglutinin.
  • Isoidiolysin (i-so-id-e-oV -is-in) . See Idioisoly- sin.
  • Isolactose (i-so-lak' -toz) . A disaccharid or true sugar formed by the action of an enzym on lactose or milk-sugar.
  • Isolate (is'-o-lat) (isola, from insula, an island). To separate; to place apart.
  • Isolysin (i-soV -is-in) (iso-; Xuecv, to loose). A lysin produced in the blood of an animal by the blood-cells of another animal of the same species.
  • Isolysis (i-sol f -is-is). The hemolytic action of the blood-serum of an animal of one species upon the corpuscles of another in- dividual of the same species.
  • Isomaltose (i-so-mawl'-tdz), C 12 H 22 O u . A saccharose formed by the action on starch of an enzym capable of producing maltose. It occurs in small quantity in the urine.
  • Isomer (i'-som-er) (iso-; pepog, a part). An isomeric body. See Isomeric.
  • Isomeric (i-so-mer'-ik) (see Isomer) . Of a chemic substance, composed of the same elements united in the same proportions by weight; in a restricted sense, composed of the same elements and having the same molecular weight as another substance.
  • Isomorphic (i-so-mor' -fik) (iso-; pop6poc, a tend- ing). A condition in which the eyes lie in the same horizontal plane, the tension of the vertical muscles of each eye being equal, and the visual lines lying in the same plane.
  • Isopilocarpin (i-so-pi-lo-kar' -pin) . An alka- loid from jaborandi isomeric with pilocarpin and similar to it in physiologic effect, but weaker.
  • Isopral (i f -so-pral) . Trichlorisopropyl alco- hol. A hypnotic substance with odor of camphor.
  • Isopters (i-sop'-terz) (iso-; dxrrjp, observer). The curves of relative visual acuity of the retina, at different distances from the macula, for form and for color.
  • Isothermal (i-so-ther' -mal) (iso-; deppy, heat). Of equal or uniform temperature. I. Lines, lines drawn through places having the same average temperature for a given period of time.
  • Isotropic, Isotropous (i-so-trop'-ik, i-sot'- ro-pus) (see Isotropy). 1. Having the same shape and appearance, from whatever point observed. 2. Being singly refractive.
  • Isotropy (i-sot' -ro-pe) (iso-; xponi), turning). 1. The condition of having equal or uniform properties throughout. 2. In embryology, Pfliiger's term for absence of predetermined axes.
  • Issue (ish'-u) (Fr., issue, from exire, to go out). 1. An ulcer or fistulous passage made and kept up artificially for purposes of counter- irritation. 2. Offspring. 3. A discharge or flux. I. Pea, a pea-shaped foreign body, as of ivy-wood or orris-root, inserted into an issue to keep up suppuration.
  • Isthmocholosis (is-mo-kol-o' -sis) (isthmus; Zohr), bile). Angina accompanied with bil- ious disorder.
  • Isthmopyra (is-mo-pi'-rah) (isthmus; nop, fire). Inflammation of the mucosa of the fauces.
  • Isthmus (is'-mus) (hdp.Sc, isthmus). 1. A narrow, contracted part uniting two larger parts of an organ. 2. See Brain-axis. I. of the Fauces, the space between the arches of the palate. I. of the Thyroid Gland, the narrow part connecting the lobes of the thyroid body.
  • Iteral (i'-ter-al) (iter). Relating to a passage, particularly the sylvian aqueduct.
  • Ithycyphes, Ithycyphos (ith-e-si' -fez, -os) (Wi)KUT)c, curved directly outward). Hav- ing a backward angular projection of the spinal column.
  • Itinerarium (i-tin-er-a' -re-um) (iter). A lith- otomy staff.
  • Itrol (it'-rol). Silver citrate. See under Silver.
  • Itrosyl (it'-ro-sil). Concentrated nitrous ether.
  • Its solution (acidum hydriodicum diluium, U. S.
  • Ivory (i'-vor-e) (eboreus, made of ivory, from ebur, ivory). The hard, bone-like substance chiefly obtained from the tusks of elephants. I. -black, animal charcoal. I., Decalcified, IXODES 529 (VON) JAKSCH'S DISEASE ivory treated with acid and deprived of inorganic constituents. I., Dental, dentin.
  • Ixodes (iks-o'-dez) (/fof, bird-lime; eldoc, form). A genus of the order Acarida, in- cluding most of the parasitic ticks.
  • Ixodic (iks-od'-ik) (see Ixodes). Due to or de- rived from ticks.
  • JEtas (e'-tas) (L.). Age; a period of life. See Age.
  • Jaborandi (jab -or -an' -de). See Pilocarpus.
  • Jaborandin (jab-o-ran' -din) . Synonym of Pilocarpin.
  • Jactitation (jak-tit-a'-shun) (jactitare, to pour forth). A tossing about, a condition at times present in grave diseases.
  • Jalapin (jal'-ap -in) (jalap). A purgative glu- cosid from various kinds of jalap.
  • Janiceps (jan'-is-eps) (Janus, a two-faced divinity; caput, head). A syncephalic mon- strosity with two faces.
  • Japaconin (jap-ak'-on-in), C 26 H 41 NO 10 . A decomposition-product of japaconitin.
  • Japaconitin (jap-ak-on'-it-in), C C6 H 8S N 2 21 , A base; the most poisonous of the known aconite alkaloids. It is obtained from Aconitum japonicum. On saponification it splits up into benzoic acid and japaconin.
  • Jasmine (jas'-min). See Gelsemium.
  • Jecorin (jek'-or-in) (jecur). 1. C 1 o 5 H 186 N 5 SP 3 . A body found in liver-substance; it resembles lecithin, but reduces Fehling's solution. It occurs also in the spleen, muscle, brain, etc. 2. A proprietary substitute for cod-liver oil.
  • Jecur (je'-ker) (L.). The liver.
  • Jejunal (je-ju'-naV) (jejunum). Pertaining to the jejunum.
  • Jejunostomy (je-ju-nos' -to-me) (jejunum; ozopta, mouth). The making of an artificial opening through the abdominal wall into the jejunum.
  • Jejunotomy (je-ju-not' -o-me) (jejunum; ze/i- vecv, to cut). Partial excision of the jejunum.
  • Jejunum (je-ju'-num) (jejunus, empty, be- cause usually found empty after death). The second division of the small intestine extending between the duodenum and the ileum, and measuiing about 8 feet (2.2 meters) in length.
  • Jennerian (jen-e' -re-an) . Pertaining to Ed- ward Jenner, the discoverer of vaccination against smallpox.
  • Jequiritol (je-kwir 1 -it-ol) . A sterile solution of abrin used in corneal affections.
  • Jequirity (je-kwir' -it-e) . See Abrus.
  • Jervin (jer'-vin). See Veratrum.
  • Jimson-weed (jim' 'son-wed) . See Stramo- nium.
  • Joint. See Articulation. J., Charcot's. See Charcot's Disease (2).
  • Joule (jowl) (after J. P. Joule, an English physicist). 1. A unit of electric energy, equivalent to the work expended when a current of one ampere flows for one second against a resistance of one ohm. 2. A small calory — the amount of heat required to raise the gram of water i°C.
  • Jugomaxillary (ju-go-maks'-il-a-re) (jugum; maxilla, the jaw). Relating to the jugular vein and the maxilla.
  • Jugulate (ju'-gu-lat) (jugulum). To check or stop any process promptly.
  • Jugulation (ju-gu-la' -shun) (jugidatio, a kill- ing). The swift arrest of disease by thera- peutic means; also the arrest of an epidemic by prompt and effective measures.
  • Jugulum (ju'-gu-lum) (L.). The collar-bone; also the throat.
  • Jugum (ju'-gum) (L.). i. A yoke. 2. A ridge.
  • Juice (jus) (jus, broth). 1. The liquid con- tained in vegetal or animal tissues. 2. Any of the secretions of the body,~as the intestinal or pancreatic juice.
  • Jujube (ju'-jub) (L., jujuba). The fruit of the jujube tree, Zizyphus jujuba. J. -paste, a paste containing the pulp of jujubes and used in pulmonary disorders. It is now made of gum-arabic or of gelatin, variously flavored.
  • Julep (ju'-lep) (Pers., julab, a sweet drink). A sweetened drink containing aromatic or medicinal substances.
  • Jumentous (ju-men' -tus) (jumentum, a beast of burden). Like a beast of burden; horse- like : applied to the odor of urine.
  • Jumpers (jum' -perz) (Scand., gumpa, to jump). Persons afflicted with a peculiar neurosis by reason of which they do whatever they are told, and perform sudden leaping or jump- ing movements. See Lata; Palmus.
  • K. The symbol for potassium (kalium).
  • Kairolin (ki'-ro-lin) (kairin), C 10 H 15 N. Methyl- quinolin hydrid. An antipyretic resembling kairin, but less efficient.
  • Kaki (kak'-e). The fruit of Diospyros kaki, Japanese persimmon; used in vomiting of pregnancy and in diarrhea.
  • Kakidrosis (kak-id-ro f -sis) (na/coc, bad; cdpd>c, sweat). Fetid perspiration.
  • Kakke (kak'-ka) (Chinese for "leg disease"). Epidemic and endemic multiple neuritis, or beriberi.
  • Kakosmia (kak-oz'-me-ah). See Cacosmia.
  • Kala-azar. An obscure fatal disease, preva- lent in Assam, supposed to be due to the effects of uncinariasis upon a population poisoned by malaria.
  • Kaligenous (kal-ij' -en-us) (kali; generate, to produce). Yielding potash.
  • Kalimeter (ka-lim' -et-er) . See Alkalimeter.
  • Kalium (ka'-le-um). Potassium.
  • Kamila, Kamala (kam-i'-lah, -a'-lah) (Hind., kamila). Rottlera. The glands and hairs from the capsules of Mallotus philippinensis (Rottlera tinctoria), native to southern Asia and Abyssinia. It is purgative and anthel- mintic, and is used for the expulsion of lum- bricoid worms and tape-worms.
  • Kangaroo. A marsupial mammal of Aus- tralia and the neighboring islands. K. Ten- don, a tendon derived from the tail of the kangaroo and used for surgical ligatures.
  • Kaolin, Kaolinum (ka'-o-lin, ka-o-W -num) (Chin., kaoling, "high ridge"). Aluminium silicate. The kaolinum of the U. S. P. is ob- tained from the decomposition of feldspar. It is sometimes used as a protective applica- tion in eczema and as a coating for pills. Syn., China-clay; White clay.
  • Karnoid (kar'-noid). See Carnoid.
  • Karyaster (kar-e-as'-ter) (karyon; dozfjp, a star). The radiate arrangement of the chro- mosome during karyokinesis. Syn., Aster.
  • Karyo lymph (kar'-e-o-limf). See Karyen- chyma.
  • Karyo- (kar-e-o-) (karyon). A prefix signifying relating to the karyon or cell-nucleus.
  • Karyochromatophil (kar-e-o-kro- mat'-o-fil) (karyo-; xpajpa, color; (piAelv, to love). 1. Having a stainable nucleus. 2. A stainable nucleus.
  • Karyochrome (kar'-e-o-krom) (karyo-; %pd>pia, color). A nerve-cell the nucleus of which stains best.
  • Karyoclasis (kar-e-ok' -las-is). See Karyorrhexis.
  • Karyogamy (kar-e-og'-am-e) (karyo-; yapo^, marriage). A conjugation of cells character- ized by a fusion of the nuclei. Cf . Plastogamy.
  • Karyokinetic (kar-e-o-kin-et'-ik) (see Karyo- kinesis). Pertaining to karyokinesis, as karyokinetic figures, the forms assumed by the mitome in karyokinesis.
  • Karyolysis (kar-e-ol'-is-is) (karyo-; Xuscv, to loose). The segmentation of the nucleus of the cell.
  • Karyomite (kar'-e-o-mit). See Chromosome.
  • Karyomitosis (kar-e-o-mit-o' -sis) (see Karyo- mitome). Karyokinesis.
  • Karyomitotic (kar-e-o-mit-of -ik) (see Karyo- mitome). Relating to karyomitosis.
  • Karyon (kar'-e-on) (napuov, nucleus). The cell- nucleus.
  • Karyophagus (kar-e-of'-ag-us) (karyo-; fyayetv, to eat; pi., karyophagi). A cytozoon which destroys the nucleus of the infected cell.
  • Karyorrhexis (kar-e-or-ek'-sis) (karyo-; prj&c, rupture). Fragmentation or splitting up of a nucleus into a number of chromatin particles which become scattered in the cytoplasm; it occurs in the cells of the disappearing follicles of the ovary.
  • Karyota (kar-e-o' -tali) (karyon). Nucleated cells.
  • Karyotheca (kar-e-o-the' -ka) (karyo-; dy/cy, case). Nuclear membrane.
  • Kasagra (kas-ag'-rah) . A proprietary prepara- tion of cascara sagrada.
  • Kasena (kas'-e-nah). An aromatic preparation of cascara and senna. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc).
  • Kata- (kat-ah-). A prefix denoting down or intensive. For words thus beginning and not found under K see Cata-.
  • Katabiotic (kat-ah-bi-ot'-ik) (kata-; (Itoc, life). Applied to the power of growing structures which causes the development of approximate cells to be harmonious with the primary structure.
  • Katabolergy (kat-ab-ol'-er-je) (kata-; paXXav, to throw; 'ipyov, work). Energy extended in katabolic processes.
  • Katabolic (kat-ab-ol'-ik) (kata-; fiaXXecv, to - throw). Of the nature of, or pertaining to, katabolism.
  • Katabolin, Katabolite (kat-ab'-o-lin, -lite) (see Katabolic). Any product of katabo- lism.
  • Katabolism (kat-ab' -ol-izm) (see Katabolic). Destructive metamorphosis; disassimilation; physiologic disintegration.
  • Katacrotic (kat-ah-krot' -ik) (kata-; Kpozoc, a striking). Interrupting the line of descent in a sphygmogram.
  • Katadicrotic (kat-ah-di-krot'-ik). Having one or more secondary expansions, as a pulse.
  • Katadioptric (kat-ah-di-of-trik) (kata-; diox- vrjp, a watchman). Applied to optical instru- ments which have the power of reflecting and refracting light at the same time.
  • Katalysis (kat-al'-is-is) (kata-; Xuecv, to dissolve). In chemistry, a reaction that appears to take place owing to the mere presence of another body that apparently undergoes no change.
  • Katalyst (kat'-al-isf). A substance having the power to produce katalysis.
  • Katalytic (kat-al-it'-ik) (see Katalysis). 1. Of the nature of, or characterized by, katal- ysis. 2. Any medicine that is supposed to break down, destroy, or counteract morbid agencies existing within the economy. 3. A retrogressive change.
  • Katalyzer (kat'-al-i-zer). A substance acceler- ating chemic or physical processes which would occur without it.
  • Kataphoria (kat-ah- fo'-re-ah) (kata-; cpopoc, tending). A tendency of both eyes to assume too low a plane.
  • Kataphoric (kat-af-or'-ik) (kataphoria). 1. Passing or causing to pass from the anode to the kathode, through a diaphragm or septum. 2. Relating to lethargy or to apoplexy.
  • Katastaltic (kat-as-taV -tik) (mzaozeXXstv, to check; to send downward). 1. Astringent. 2. Passing from above downward (as a nerve -impulse). 3. An inhibitory or sedative agent.
  • Katastate (kat f -as-tat) (Kazaozazof, settling down). Any one of a series of suc- cessive katabolic substances or conditions, each one of which is less complex, more stable, and exhibits less functional activity than its predecessor.
  • Katatonia (kat-at-o' -ne-ah) (kata-; zbvoc, tension). A form of insanity characterized by a pathetic emotional state and verbigeration, combined with a condition of motor tension.
  • Katatricrotism (kat-at-ri-krof -izm) (kata-; zpe'cc, three; upozbc, a striking). The occur- rence of a third pulsation in the downward stroke of the sphygmograph. Katatropia (kat-ah-tro'-pe-ah) (kata-; zpbnog, a turn). An actual turning of both eyes downward.
  • Katelectrotonus (kal-el-ek-trot'-o-nus) (kata-; TjXeKzpov, amber; zbvoc, tension). The state KATEX 535 KERATITIS of increased irritability of a nerve near the kathode. See Anelectrotonus.
  • Katex. (kat'-eks.). An abbreviation of kathode excitation.
  • Kathodal (kath-o' -dal) . Of or pertaining to the kathode.
  • Kathode (kath'-od) (kata-; odor, way). The negative electrode or pole of a galvanic cir- cuit.
  • Kathodic (kath-od' -ik) . See Kathodal.
  • Kation (kat'-e-on). See Cation.
  • Katochus (kat-o'-kus) (koxoxoc, catalepsy). An unconscious condition, resembling sleep with open eyes, observed in intermittent fever, etc.
  • Kefir, Kefyr (kef'-ir). See Kephir.
  • Kelectome (ke' '-lek-tom) (ktXt), a tumor; ek, out; zkfivecv, to cut). A cutting instrument introduced into a tumor, by means of a can- nula, in order to obtain a part of the sub- stance for examination.
  • Kelene (kel'-en). Purified ethyl chlorid.
  • Kelis (ke'-lis) (ktjMc, scar). Keloid.
  • Keloplasty (kel-o-plas' -te) . See Chiloplasty.
  • Kelosoma (kel-o-so' -mah) . See Celosoma.
  • Kelotomy (ke-lot' -o-me) . Herniotomy.
  • Kelpion (kelp' -e-on) (kelp, seaweed yielding iodin). An ointment containing iodin, which is volatilized when the ointment is warmed.
  • Kenencephalocele (ken-en-sef'-al-o-sel) (k£voc, empty; encephalocele). A protrusion of brain- substance through a cranial fissure. Kenesthesia (ken-es-the'-ze-ah) (ksvoc, destitute; esthesia). Hysteric loss of consciousness of identity.
  • Kenesthesis (ken-es-the 1 '-sis) (kenesthesia). A feeling of depression or exaltation the result of the subconscious perceptions from the whole organism.
  • Kenophobia (ken-o-fo'-be-ah) (ksvoc, empty; 6(3oc, fear). A morbid fear of large empty spaces.
  • Kenosis (ken-o'-sis) (idvioote, a draining). 1. An evacuation. 2. Inanition.
  • Kenotic (ken-ot'-ik) (kenosis). 1. Causing ken- osis; drastic, purgative. 2. A drastic drug or agent.
  • Kerat-, Kerato- (ker-at-, ker-at-o-) (fcipac, horn; cornea). Prefixes denoting relation to the cornea or to horn.
  • Keratalgia (ker-at-al' -je-ah) (kerat-; alyoc, pain). Pain in the cornea.
  • Keratectasia (ker-at-ek-ta 1 '-se-ah) (kerat-; \Kxaatc, extension). A bulging forward of the cornea.
  • Keratin (ker'-at-in) (nkpac, horn). The basis of horny epithelium, hair, nails, feathers, etc. It contains sulfur, and on decomposition yields leucin and tyrosin.
  • Keratocele (ker'-at-o-sel) (kerato-; kt)At), hernia). A hernia of Descemet's membrane through the cornea.
  • Keratocentesis (ker-at-o-sen-te'-sis) (kerato-; Kevrrjoce, a pricking). Corneal puncture.
  • Keratoconus (ker-at-o-ko'-nus) (kerato-; kujvoq, cone). A conic protrusion of the cornea.
  • Keratocricoid (ker-at-o-kri'-koid) (kerato-; np'c- koc, ring; eldof, like). The cricothyroid muscle.
  • Keratogenesis (ker-at-o-jen'-e-sis) (kerato-; yev- vav, to produce). The formation of horny material or growths.
  • Keratogenous (ker-at-of -en-us) (see Keratogene- sis). Producing a horny or horn-like sub- stance.
  • Keratoglobus (ker-at-o-glo'-bus) (kerato-; glo- bus, a ball). A globular protrusion of the cornea.
  • Keratoglossus (ker-at-o-glos'-us). See under Muscle.
  • Keratohelcosis (ker-at-o-hel-ko'-sis) (kera- to-; eXKOJocc, ulceration). Ulceration of the cornea.
  • Keratohyal (ker-at-o-hi'-al) (kerato-; hyoid). Relating to a cornu of the hyoid bone.
  • Keratohyalin (ker-at-o-hi'-al-in) (kerato-; uaXoc, glass). A peculiar substance occurring in granules in the deeper layers of the skin.
  • Keratohyaline (ker-at-o-hi'-al- en) . Both horny and hyaline in structure.
  • Keratoid (ker'-at-oid) (kerato-; slooc, like). Horn- like.
  • Keratoiritis (ker-at-o-i-ri'-tis) (kerato-; iritis). Combined inflammation of the cornea and the iris.
  • Keratolysis (ker-at-ol'-is-is) (kerato-; Xuoce, solu- tion). A shedding of the skin; a rare con- dition in which the skin is shed periodically, that of the limbs coming off as a glove or stocking.
  • Keratoma (ker-at-o' -mah) (kerato-; opta, tumor), i. See Callosity. 2. Congenital ichthyosis; the presence of horny plates upon the integu- ment.
  • Kermes (ker'-mez) (Pers., qirmiz, crimson). A red dyestuff resembling cochineal, made from the bodies of the dried insects, Coccus ilicis, found on the kermes-oak. K.-min- eral, a mixture of antimony teroxid and tersulfid.
  • Ketone (ke' - ton) (an arbitrary variation of acetone). An or- ganic compound consisting of the unsaturated radicle = C = O united to two alcohol radicles.
  • Key (ke) (ME., keye). i. An in- strument for opening or fasten- ing a lock. 2. A device for making and breaking an electric current. K., DuBois Rey- mond's, an electric switch by means of which the circuit may be closed or the current short- circuited. Syn., T eternizing key.
  • Kilo (kil'-o). A contraction of kilo- gram.
  • Kilocalory (kil-o-kal' '-or-e) . See Calory, Great.
  • Kilogram (kil'-o-gram) (x'tXtot, a thousand; ypa/xfia, an inscription). One thousand grams, or 2.2 pounds avoirdupois.
  • Kiloliter (kiV -o-le-ter) (kilo; Xhpa, sl pound). One thousand liters, or 35.31 cubic feet.
  • Kilometer (kiV -o-me-ter) (kilo; fikrpov, sl meas- ure). One thousand meters, or 1093.6 yards. Kilostere (kil'-o-ster) (kilo, One thousand cubic meters.
  • Kinematics (kin-em-at'-iks) (kcvsIv, to move). The science of motion.
  • Kinesalgia (kin-es-al'-je-ah) (kinesis; alyoc, pain). Local pain following muscular con- traction.
  • Kinescope (kin'-es-kop) (kcve'iv, to move; oko- tzecv, to view). A device to regulate with accuracy the width of an aperture through which rays of light are allowed to pass in measuring ametropia.